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Gee, Criollo, I ate fried smelts for much of my life -- never thought about the head and guts ... I'll have to think about that. (Hey, I devein shrimp! Spouse said, but it's so much work, and my response was, but that's their intestine, not a "vein." Think about it.)

 

squeamishly yours,

Gayle **

 

**ps: the closer something looks to its natural state, the more I think, well, I should be a vegetarian. But I like meat, some fish, and some shellfish too much.

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Steve ,

 

You may be right about grunion, but there are a number of different types of smelts,. Still, the PBS program I was watching the other night was referring to them as smelts.

 

More research is necessary, apparently.

 

Paul M.

==

As I read your description I was thinking grunion. That's what we have on the west coast. When they come in on the waves t night they light up the waves with their phosphorescence. Really a pretty sight. I once saw them come in during the day on the oast of ghe Gulf of California. The kids who were with me had a wonderful time putting them into a bucket and we all had grunion for dinner (cleaned and beheaded).

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Shea et All,

 

Yes I have heard of grunion and seen films about them, too.

 

But from what I read online, in Google, and in several dictionaries, it sounds to me like the terms 'smelt' and 'grunion' are sometimes interchangeable depending on which species of fish in the world is being referred to. They all seems to be smallish, silver-colored 'sardine'looking' fishes.

 

As I mentioned earlier I was watching a program earlier this week on PBS and they were celling the little myriads of little silvery fish that were spawning on the beach 'smelt'. I am sure PBS would have made certain the film makers had researched their topic before allowing the film to air. I'm not gonna try to second guess them.

 

¡Pura Feeda!

 

Paul M.

==

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I don't think it's a case of one or the other being correct. They may be different fish, or just different names depending on location. Many things have different names in this country depending on location. Soda, pop, soft drink, coke (small c to make it generic), etc. all mean the same thing.

Edited by Shea
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I don't think it's a case of one or the other being correct. They may be different fish, or just different names depending on location. Many things have different names in this country depending on location. Soda, pop, soft drink, coke (small c to make it generic), etc. all mean the same thing.

 

Shea,

 

I believe that was the point that I was actually trying to impart.

 

Perhaps I was not quite clear enough. [sigh]

 

Later,

 

Paul M.

==

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  • 2 weeks later...

 

Spelt that way CRF it kinda sounds like it could be a Spanish Nobleman's mistress. (Is that where the term 'laying down the law' came from?)* [snip]

 

I don't think "spelt" is a word, Paul.

 

In North America, it's spelled "spelled" (see what I did there? jeje), but if you're British, either "spelled" or "spelt" can be used. Kind of like dreamed or dreamt. There's another common one that's right on the tip of my brain, but eludes me ...

 

Hola Gentle Forumsers,

 

After all the discussion recently n this topic about whether 'spelt' was a valid alternative spelling of 'spelled', I happened to receive this article today from my friend the translator.

 

We both have an interest in linguistics and languages.

 

See what y'all think after reading the article. I, for one, found the article very interesting and it answered a number of questions that I have had over the years, amongst which it says that that's not necessarily a British usage.

 

Here's the link:

 

I dreamed a dream … or was it dreamt?

http://unabridged.merriam-webster.com/blog/2013/09/i-dreamed-a-dream-or-was-it-dreamt/

 

OK, I'm interested in hearing your thought afterwards.

 

Paul M.

==

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Interesting! I have always used "dreamt", but not spelt or learnt. I've always prefered "snuck" to "sneaked", so it was interesting to read how that usage snuck up on us (har har), changing to irregular instead of the other way around,as is more common.

 

Here's a video about the differences in how some plurals form, and why, for example: goose >>> geese, but NOT moose >>> meese, jaja.

 

 

Whoa ... I didn't know it would show up actually in the window.

Edited by stewart.tb
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