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David C. Murray

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Everything posted by David C. Murray

  1. Well, there are those who bring new vehicles directly from Japan and Korea. Each vehicle brand (Toyota, Nissan, Honda, Kia, Hyundai, and more) has a sole importer of their cars to Costa Rica. That's true for European brands, too. Mercedes, Maserati, Porsche, Ferrari, etc are all available here. (Can you imagine the annual marchamo on a quarter million dollar Ferrari?) And you can buy brands here (Renault, Peugeot, Mahindra, Great Wall and Tiger Trucks) that are not available in the U.S. (Whether any of those is a good idea is another matter.) The same import duties apply whether the vehicles c
  2. If you really want something that will meet all those criteria, consider buying a vehicle in the U.S. and having it shipped here. Unlike vehicles here, U.S. vehicles have safety and recall records, they meet U.S. safety and emission standards, and the mileage will be accurate. None of those apply to a vehicle bought here which may be a flood car, something that has been totaled in the U.S., or which has had the odometer turned back many thousands of miles. The cost to import a car to Costa Rica is the same whether a used car dealer or you import it.
  3. Even a "tangential reference" (in the eyes of some (one, actually)) can get you booted.
  4. But there is a way for the Administrator or Moderator to cancel your membership in the forum, right?
  5. Since real estate agents work locally, not nationally, it would be helpful to know where your farm is located.
  6. 2.9 Liter Turbo Diesel CRDI with 2-wheel drive, 4-wheel drive and 4-wheel drive low range automatic transmission Five passenger seating Exterior: Silver over Grey (excellent); Interior: Light Grey Leather (very good) Air conditioning AM/FM Bluetooth stereo radio with CD player MultiLock transmission lock Fog lights 148,000 kilometers (92,000 miles) Regularly maintained in accordance with the owner’s manual (service history available) Good Pirelli Scorpion ATR tires, good brakes, good suspension, good belts and hoses, etc Riteve until June 2018
  7. Derrick102 is right, James. It isn't the property that has the assets, it's the corporation that owns the property that has the assets, the property itself. It's highly unlikely that any vacant land has no value whatsoever. And it's even more unlikely that land with a building like (say) a residence has no value either. So the corporation that owns the property and the buildings on it must, by definition, have valuable assets. Those are what are at risk if a lawsuit against the corporation succeeds. Too, imagine that some non-profit corporation (use the Cruz Roja as an example) is
  8. The liability insurance coverage available here (again, at very reasonable costs) is likely greater than the value of the assets in a corporation that insurance would protect. It is, of course, possible that a judge would find in favor of the injured party in an amount greater than the limits of the liability policy but has anyone ever heard of such a ruling? Even one? Ever?
  9. You are all correct that public liability coverage on your vehicle and on your homeowner's insurance is the single best way to protect your interests. In both cases, the premiums are very reasonable and, should you be likely to be found liable, most injured parties would settle for the limits of the policy in an out-of-court settlement rather than go through the pain and cost of a legal suit which they might not win or live to see resolved. Covering your potential victims also provides a measure of humanity. Should I injure someone, and especially if it really is my fault, I want to
  10. James, I'm not an attorney but I've consulted with some and I've read up on the issue. I don't know how this matter was explained to you or by whom, but I think your understanding is inside-out. Think about it . . . Suppose you trip and fall in a store that's owned by a corporation. You successfully sue the corporation and are awarded damages because the corporation is found to be liable for your injuries. You can collect from that corporation, but you cannot collect from the unrelated corporation that owns the gas station next door. They are separate entities. You didn't fall in the gas
  11. James, above you wrote, "Also it prevents someone from taking your land from you in case someone is hurt badly on your property and they sue you and it's determined that it's your fault. If it's in an S.A. they can't come after you." I think you have that exactly backward. If your property is in a corporation and the corporation is successfully sued, the liability for damages is limited to the value of the assets held by that corporation. So if, for example, someone falls on your property and is seriously injured, they can sue the corporation and win its assets, the property, but they can
  12. I have no experience with totally destroyed or disabled vehicles to share, James. Sorry.
  13. Even though only about twenty percent of stolen vehicles are ever recovered here in Costa Rica, the law dictates that a vehicle is not considered legally stolen until thirty days after the theft is reported to the OIJ. That helps to explain the delays in settlements for stolen vehicles. What's more, you must report the theft within 24 hours, even on weekends and holidays, and only to the OIJ office rather than the local Fuerza Publica. Neighbors have recommended that, should your vehicle be stolen, the first thing you should do is notify the local taxi companies who can tell their driver
  14. James, the cost of homeowners' insurance will vary with the value of your home, the value of its contents, and perhaps other considerations. Our insurance agent was flabbergasted to learn that we do not live in a gated, guarded subdivision and that we do not have bars on our windows and doors. Those issues may have influenced the cost of our homeowners' insurance policy as did the fact that we included a substantial collection of artwork and rugs in our coverage. In homeowners' insurance policies, one size does not fit all.
  15. When we removed our vehicle from its corporation and dissolved the corporation, the total cost was a bit greater than the old corporation tax would have been for that year, but since then we have more than recovered the legal costs by avoiding subsequent years' corporation taxes. As far as having a vehicle in a corporation in order to avoid liability, you will be better off to dissolve the corporation and then buy public liability insurance which you can pay for, in part at least, with the savings on the corporation tax. As good citizens, we believe we should be liable for injuries, deat
  16. For my part, there certainly were philosophical differences with the content. The forum generally became a magnet for conspiracy theories some of which had their origins with Scott and others from forum participants. The forum lost it's Costa Rica orientation in favor of nonsensical rants about things that had neither happened nor would ever happen. Scott might have reined all that in, but then that would have been out of character for him. Too, I was put off by Scott's frequent and baseless attacks on Israel. Certainly, Israel has not always behaved admirably, but Scott went out of his wa
  17. We have a one bedroom guest house adjacent to our home. We have had very consistent rentals over the past nine years, but still I would not recommend a rental property as a sound investment. We are unlikely to ever break even. Were it mine to do, I'd put my money in Certificates of Deposit at Coopenae in San Ramon. Coopenae's financials are very sound and your money remains liquid. The traditional advice is that it's easy to buy in Costa Rica but difficult to sell. If you ever needed your investment back, you might be out of luck. What's more, CDs require no maintenance and they earn inte
  18. Thany you all for the good wishes, but I refuse to admit being any older than 65. So today is actually my fourth anniversary and nothing more. And as for the legs, you should see the rest of me. (Hmmmm . . . Maybe not.)
  19. Uh, I think that should read, ". . . barefoot, pregnant and in the kitchen."
  20. Riverjop, you're welcome to your feelings about the removal of the Pledge of Allegiance and prayer from opening exercises in the public schools, but were you to actually read the compelling logic of the Supreme Court's decisions in those matters, your opinion might change. Serious fundamentalist Christians asserted that the Bible prohibits swearing allegiance to anyone but God and to have to recite the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag of the United States violates that prohibition. The logic of the legal opinion of the Court that found in their favor is compelling. A similar argument was
  21. Tiffany, you make compelling good sense. There is a book by Stephanie Coontz titled "The Way Things Never Were" that is well worth reading. It explodes a lot of the myths about those "good old days". http://www.amazon.com/Way-We-Never-Were-Nostalgia/dp/0465090974/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1418312566&sr=1-2&keywords=the+way+things+never+were I used to work for a guy who lamented that the fabric of society was being torn apart. The argument can be made. An alternative view, however, might be that a new fabric is being woven. While I've not read the torture rep
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