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  3. Congrats. La Migra in the States can be a real pain. I have never known anyone who has had a good experience, even when the outcome was good. Your patience has been rewarded. So now you all are a TicoGringo and a GringaTica.
  4. Wow! Let me add my Congrats to him as well. That's really Great to hear . . . Cheers! Paul M. ==
  5. I'm excited to announce that my esposo just passed his US citizenship test & interview! Huzzah!!! In about two weeks we'll have his oath and then we apply for his passport and then he's a GRINGO! While this was a hugely frustrating and expensive process, my CR residency is still pending... With his new gringo passport we have the ability to move out of the USA without ever having to reapply for visas again! Costa Rica as a more permanent location may or may not be in our future. My esposo gets horribly homesick, but he knows financially it makes more sense for us to stay up here. We'll see where life takes us. But for now, the world is our oyster! (And since he's dual, he can still go to Brazil visa free!)
  6. Glad it has been a positive experience!
  7. So, after some research, it is pretty common that the seller pays the tax on commission. We negotiated that out and will pay 7%. There is always great debate on this forum of renting vs buying. We just accepted the SPA (Sales Purchase Agreement) rom the buyer and have sold (or the buyer will forfeit the deposit) our property for 106% of what we purchased it for 7 years and 5 months ago. Great investment, a special property and now onto the next one!
  8. Greetings friends. After over 7 years on this site, my wife and I are selling a property and I wanted to get a feel for sellers fees and specifically if it is standard for the seller to pay for the taxes on the real estate commission for the broker. I can see generally there are taxes paid for that, but not who is responsible and I am thinking since it is not specially called out it is just something the real estate person pays themselves?
  9. Where's this month's seminar being held?

  10. Eleanor, well you got a taste of what my plumbing disaster was like anyway. .. I have PTSD from that plus the tropical storm last week where I had water coming in my front door and bedroom. I hope NO MORE water problems for at least a few months! Would love to have a 3 wheeler for backup! Now if someone will just give me the $ for one, LOL.
  11. James, this is the main reason I moved closer to town. I lived 3 km up a very steep hill on a very bad road and it just became too much after a while. I now live about 300 meters from the center of town on a very quiet street that features toucans across the street, parrots nesting in my back yard and monkeys moving through from time to time. I have fruit trees and a few plantings for the kitchen. So really, the best of both worlds! Yes, I have to put up with the thump of my neighbor's bass and the occasional very loud truck, but that's not really a big deal. In return, I can easily walk to shopping and banking and the bus but use my car when the huesos viejos are acting up. Edit: About an hour after writing that, I was doing some laundry and the hose to my washing machine flew off and sprayed water all over the porch and everything in it, including ME! hahaha I thought about you James. Yes, I had to sweep and mop and clean off the water and change my clothes and then make a note to buy a hose clamp and fix the hose to the washing machine.
  12. Hey Eleanor, I appreciate Paul's sentiment and intention to help but I agree: It's not that easy or affordable having and caring for a horse. Also there is this issue. This grass I have is African, impossible to replace without using Monsanto roundup / rodeo which I am against using, so there's really no practical way of having a horse here without buying feed AND fixing the fence and being prepared for vet calls and etc etc. Can 't afford a moto either right now, plus an old guy like me on a moto on a bad road? Not sure that's such a great idea either. (Last time my friend gave me a ride back from the mechanic's on his, the shaking of my bones left my back hurting for 2 days!) And if I did wreck (as most do one time or another) my old bones might not recover very quickly. The only viable alternative really - at this point - is a taxi or getting rides. Meanwhile as of today, with this "tropical storm", the whole country is flooded, roads are closed, bridges are out and so a car is not much good anyway. I'm stuck here til they fix the roads.
  13. That's actually a very good suggestion, Induna. Those 3-wheelers get dozens of miles per gallon! Plus he's got extra parts for them, too! Hope Newman is watching and will chime in. Cheers! Paul M. ==
  14. Maybe James should buy one of Newman's tuk-tuks and keep it as a backup?
  15. I think you've gone off the rails a little bit, Paul. Plant grass to feed a horse/mule/burro? I guess you would then need to construct a corral, make sure your property is fenced, see that there are no plants that are poisonous to the animals, build a shelter for them to keep out of the rain, bedding for the shelter, vet calls (8 miles out...or more....), medicines, grain, vitamins..... it's complicated looking after a living thing. If having a Plan B for transportation is a real worry and a real need, then so much easier just to buy an inexpensive used motorbike. It doesn't eat when you don't use it and can sit on blocks under a tarp while not in use. I feel your pain, James! I've lived in a remote area like yours and while it's truly a blessing with all the wild around you, it can sometimes be a curse. I'm sure you will figure it out.
  16. Maybe getting some starts of suitable forage grass that a horse (or burro) can eat and plugging it around so as to gradually (or faster) edge out the stuff that is not good for forage would ultimately net you a less expensive horse cost by reducing much of the horsefeed expense. ¡Solamente dos más granitos de arena! Paul M. ==
  17. Hey Paul, we did look into getting a horse and as it turns out it costs a bit to feed them and our local expert says we have a type of grass they won't eat so we'd have to buy feed which is a bit expensive actually for someone on a tight budget. Wouldn't mind having one though. Then of course you're bound to have vet bills at some point... I would like to have a burro or mule instead actually, but the same problems exist. Looked into buying one and WOW! I guess around here they are much more expensive than a horse is! Go figure! Guess that's why we don't see a lot of burros and mules. However I heard they USED to be cheaper... I figured out that IF I had no car here I'd just have to pay $22 or so for a round trip into town every week. Not ideal but do-able and actually cheaper than owning a car what with insurance, gas, upkeep, etc. But it's just that a car is so important to have in the case of an emergency, and also much much more convenient!
  18. Maybe a horse might be in order to get you to town and/or to the bus. (Horse prolly could stay with a sympathetic in-town neighbor while you went off on the bus.) Horse could help carry the groceries, etc., back home after a trip to town and he'd also be good to help keep your yard cropped down. Just a tico type idea. Cheers! Paul M. ==
  19. Appreciate your comments. Unfortunately most of them don't apply to me as, yes, I do live in a very remote area and there is no nearby bus nor nearby taxi, the taxi has to come from 8 miles away so it's expensive. Yes a neighbor might be able to help me with a ride. But the pickens are slim. Or I might be able to get a ride if I go out and walk and "hitch-hike". No store is going to deliver where I live. A rental car would have to be a 4x4, I'd have to go all the way to Alajuela or the airport to rent one, and last time I did it cost $500 a week with insurance. A taxi from 8 miles away would be cheaper! So yeah, I know, I live in a place where a car is pretty much a necessity and if I am without it, it is a hardship. That's just how it is and I accept that. I just wish that car insurance was reliable like it is in the USofA. Some things here just aren't as good.
  20. I am really late to this party, I know, but I saw this the other day and have given it some thought. I was in a similar situation after an accident where my little truck was in the shop for 6 weeks. (Yes... six weeks.) I lived only 3 km from the bus line, but it was either straight down or straight up steep hills. I would sometimes walk down to the bus stop and taxi back up but sometimes I just didn't feel like walking. So here are some things that might be useful to you if you are ever in that situation, James. 1. Local taxis -- use these to pick you up and take you to the bus stop or take you to some local shopping. 2. Friends and neighbors -- people in Costa Rica are really good about giving rides to other people. But if where you live is truly remote, that could be a problem. Would it be possible to walk to a more-traveled road and pick up a ride there? 3. Talk to local shopping - supermarkets, hardware stores, etc, and see if they will deliver. Almost all of them will, for a fee. And you can call the supermarket or other stores and put in an order and they will send it to you, either by their own transport or by taxi. 4. Car rental -- rent a car for a week and get as much done as possible during that time. Some bus travel might be involved in picking up the car, of course. 5. Be as efficient as possible. Look ahead to see what needs to be done in the next month that can't be done via internet or phone and try to get all that done in one fell swoop, if possible. This would limit your need to use the bus to get to town or need for a rental car. 6. Cheap car rentals. This one is tricky! I own a 7-passenger van and some friends rented my car for a couple of days when family came to visit and they only had a small truck. This is definitely some "under the table" type of thing, so must be very careful. But it might be possible to find a local person who would be interested in letting you rent their car for a while. One also must be very careful when renting from some official rental car companies that offer really cheap rates. They are really cheap for a reason: Things don't work right and there is essentially no customer service. Like... windows don't work, horn doesn't work, tires slick, car breaks down strands you and they do nothing about it. Let's hope that none of us is ever in the "car totaled" situation but if that happens, perhaps some of these suggestions will work if one has to wait a long time to get a replacement
  21. Right, I get it . So if you are sued for, say $10,000, some judge gives the winner a $100k property and it is sold at auction for $50k for example and you get the other $40k? Just wondering how that would work. Surely i will look into getting insurance. But just wondering how this would work...
  22. Derrick102 is right, James. It isn't the property that has the assets, it's the corporation that owns the property that has the assets, the property itself. It's highly unlikely that any vacant land has no value whatsoever. And it's even more unlikely that land with a building like (say) a residence has no value either. So the corporation that owns the property and the buildings on it must, by definition, have valuable assets. Those are what are at risk if a lawsuit against the corporation succeeds. Too, imagine that some non-profit corporation (use the Cruz Roja as an example) is successfully sued. True, it's a non-profit, but it can and does have assets. Who do you suppose owns all those offices, ambulances, etc? It's the Cruz Roja, the non-profit corporation.
  23. if the property has no assets (i.e. it's non-profit) how do they get money out of it if you're sued and lose?...............If the property is worthless, it is not an asset. If it has value, it is an asset. If you are sued and lose, they can take the property.
  24. Hmmm. Will have to look into getting liability protection for our property. I thought the idea of the SA was that they couldn't take the property from you ... if the property has no assets (i.e. it's non-profit) how do they get money out of it if you're sued and lose?
  25. The liability insurance coverage available here (again, at very reasonable costs) is likely greater than the value of the assets in a corporation that insurance would protect. It is, of course, possible that a judge would find in favor of the injured party in an amount greater than the limits of the liability policy but has anyone ever heard of such a ruling? Even one? Ever?
  26. Registration Problem

    WELL THAT was fun! I think it is fixed. Problems? EMAIL ME. Do not post here please. TG webmaster at ARCR.net
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