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      IMPORTANT - READ BEFORE POSTING to SUPPORT FORUM   01/28/2011

      Posts to this Support Forum are to be related ONLY to one's ARCR membership. Posts inappropriate to the Support Forum will be removed without comment. Please post all other types of questions to the appropriate Forum. Only Forums Moderators, Administrators and ARCR Employees ae able to make any replies to this ARCR Support Forum. Paul M. Forums Moderator ==

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  1. Yesterday
  2. Ok.....!!!!! FINALLY. After almost 2 months of searching we found a home to rent for the entire duration in Potrero. Plane tickets: done home: done... whats next
  3. Last week
  4. There are many different kinds of Bonos de Vivienda available through many agencies and for many different types of needy populations. It is very unlikely that there is any significant amount of information on these in English. Why would there be? Many of these Bonos are administered through third parties and every town has agencies advertising these services. Maybe a place to start, but be wary. Or just go straight to the Municipalidad and ask a lot of questions. That's more legwork, but maybe a better approach. Or go to your local CenCenai or Pani and ask what they know...
  5. Phil, you are looking for the value of a piece of land in Zarcero in 1993? Twenty four years later? In my mind, whatever you paid is what it was. Why would you even undertake a quest to find out how much that land was "really" worth? My advice would be -- if you are determined to pursue this -- to contact a local real estate agent or a real estate agent that handles property in Zarcero. They might -- MIGHT -- be able to help you. But property values can vary widely based on specific location so "farm land 1/2 a mile from the highway" is probably not good enough. The other option would be to go to neighbors of that property and see if you can find out anything from them. Someone might have bought/sold similar property in that neighborhood in that time frame.
  6. It has been rumored to me that Is there a program for a single Tica mother with children to help her build a house. It was said the government will help with a basic house and easy financing. If it is available where can I find the information in English? Phil
  7. Thanks for your reply! Yes the city office will have the price I paid, I have my contract of sale and documents from the government. But I am now pretty sure I paid more then it was worth. What I am looking for is an approximate real price for the land back in 1993. Phil
  8. James, above you wrote, "Also it prevents someone from taking your land from you in case someone is hurt badly on your property and they sue you and it's determined that it's your fault. If it's in an S.A. they can't come after you." I think you have that exactly backward. If your property is in a corporation and the corporation is successfully sued, the liability for damages is limited to the value of the assets held by that corporation. So if, for example, someone falls on your property and is seriously injured, they can sue the corporation and win its assets, the property, but they cannot sue you personally and take (say) your bank account if it's held in your own name. If that bank account is in the corporation's name, then it is an asset of the corporation and thus liable to seizure. That is why the traditional advice is to have separate corporations to own each parcel of real estate and each vehicle you may own. If in an accident your vehicle corporation is found to be at fault, the victim can seize the assets of that vehicle's corporation (the vehicle or whatever may be left of it), but they cannot seize your real estate because that's in a different corporation. Likewise, if someone is injured on your property owned by "Corporation A", they could not seize the real estate owned by "Corporation B".
  9. Okay I'm not an attorney and I don't play one on TV nor the internet. However, I am sharing with you what I've been told by 2 attorneys re corporations vs having property in your name. This is what I've been told: "If you have your car or property in your own name, even if you have a will that is legal in Costa Rica, when you die that property will go into probate, it will take a long time to resolve who gets it after you die, and "the government vultures" (my attorneys' term) will charge you 10% or more OF THE VALUE OF YOUR ENTIRE PROPERTY for their "services"." I was told therefore that having the property - such as a car or house or land - in a corporate name, (S.A. or SRL) will allow you to make someone such as your wife, son, daughter, whoever, the new owner of the property if you die, thus avoiding probate completely. Also it prevents someone from taking your land from you in case someone is hurt badly on your property and they sue you and it's determined that it's your fault. If it's in an S.A. they can't come after you. Again this is what I was told, that's all I know about it. I'm not an attorney!
  10. Why not talk to the Municipalidad of Zarcero? They should have all the records from that time.
  11. I bought 2 acres in Zarcero back in 1993, I am looking for a general price for land back in that time frame. The land was farm land back about 1/2 mile from the main highway, on a really crumby road it had and still no water or electric. All input welcomed! Phil
  12. Earlier
  13. Thanks everyone for your responses. I was able to obtain a box at Correos in Cobano. It appears that low season may be the time to obtain a box. I walked into Correos in Cobano and there must have been 20 Libre signs on the boxes.
  14. Some more info re dissolving a corporation. A friend of mine said he found an attorney to do it for $120. Go figure. My attorney quoted me $1,000. Guess who won't be my attorney any more?
  15. Thanks for that CRF. A shame that insurance here is not very good on a totaled car. If your experience and comments I've heard apply to most cases.
  16. Our former workers vehicle was considered 'totaled' and it took over three years to settle.
  17. I have no experience with totally destroyed or disabled vehicles to share, James. Sorry.
  18. It is also very slow if only using the basic mandatory coverage.
  19. David, that's good info! Thanks! I didn't know any of that! Is the slow payout only on STOLEN vehicles or also on totaled or badly damaged vehicles?
  20. Unfortunately we do live at least 10km from the nearest bus! That's why this slow insurance payout thing I've heard about, is a concern to me.
  21. Or even better, get a hotel no too far from the airport. Chill, rest, have a nice dinner, and have the rental agency drop the car off for you the next day at your hotel. Much more tranquilo.
  22. Good point, David. At SJO, walk right by those rental car desks, go outside and you will find the shuttle driver holding up a sign, sometimes with your name on it. I don't remember if there are rental car desks at LIR but if there are, the same advice applies. I did find out an interesting thing about car rental agencies and LIR airport: You will see shuttle drivers holding up signs inside the airport building and you will see shuttle drivers outside the building holding up signs. The agents inside the building are there because the agency has paid a fee to the airport. The last time I was there, I saw something like 5 rental car agents inside the building holding signs and a whole bunch of them outside holding signs.
  23. Young, Healthy, full of dreams

    At SJO, and probably at LIR, there is a 15% surcharge on the entire cost of your car rental if you take possession of the car at the airport. Instead, arrange with the rental car company to pick you up at the airport and bring you to their nearby office. There, you can do the paperwork and take possession of the car (and save a bundle). It may take an hour longer, but the time spent will be well worth it.
  24. PaulaB - you won't have any problem traveling around as a single female. I've been driving all over Costa Rica on my own for something like 15 years with never an "incident." Of course, this implies that you don't do anything "stupid" like leaving your binoculars on the front seat of your car while you have lunch or carrying big, visible wads of cash in your wallet. Just use your good common sense and you will be fine. Renting a car is really the best way to get around. It gives you so much freedom and flexibility. My favorite agency is Vamos. They have clear and accurate descriptions on their website, good cars and excellent customer service. Others include Budget, Dollar, Adobe, Alamo and Solid. Stay away from anything that says "cheap car rentals." You get what you pay for. Liability insurance is mandatory in Costa Rica so be sure it is included in any quote you get. (Vamos always does this...) You can use your credit card insurance for collision and other things, but this means that if you have an accident, you would have to pay out of pocket and get reimbursed from your insurance company. For peace of mind, I think it's always worth buying a "full package." But that's a personal choice. Check the Vamos website -- they are the "gold standard" of rental cars and their information is accurate and up to date. They are typically booked up way ahead of time but even if you can't rent a car through them, you can get a lot of good information from their website. Note that there are no cars at either LIR or SJO airport - they are all offsite and shuttles will pick you up and take you to their offices. A driver will be waiting for you when you arrive. Pay attention to speed limits no matter what anyone else is doing. Speeding tickets can be brutally expensive. Once you are set up in a hotel, leave your passport at the hotel and keep a copy of the main page and the page with your entry stamp. Have fun! Forgot to add.......... book directly with the Costa Rican agency and not with a US agency or through a third party. Neither the US agencies or third parties such as Priceline or Expedia will give you an accurate quote, chances are. And it there is a problem, they will wash their hands of it. If you book directly, then the Costa Rican agency will handle any problems. (Not thinking too straight -- have the flu which is why I was posting at 4:30 am lol)
  25. Testing... been weeks
  26. Even though only about twenty percent of stolen vehicles are ever recovered here in Costa Rica, the law dictates that a vehicle is not considered legally stolen until thirty days after the theft is reported to the OIJ. That helps to explain the delays in settlements for stolen vehicles. What's more, you must report the theft within 24 hours, even on weekends and holidays, and only to the OIJ office rather than the local Fuerza Publica. Neighbors have recommended that, should your vehicle be stolen, the first thing you should do is notify the local taxi companies who can tell their drivers to be on the lookout for it. They have more eyes open than the Fuerza Publica could possibly muster.
  27. I was in the Cobano post office today. They now have "Libre" stickers on all the boxes that are available. I counted more than 20 stickers.
  28. James. you gave me a good chuckle with your comment about Ticos mumbling. I remember when we first started studying with our Spanish tutor, she mentioned that Ticos use a lot of slang, and she said that sometimes she has a hard time understanding her friends BECAUSE THEY MUMBLE!!! Of course, our reaction was, if she has a hard time understanding some of them, how will we ever be able to understand what they're saying? But we know how to ask someone to repeat what they said and to speak slowly, so that helps. My hubby backed our car into a culvert creating $2000 worth of damage to the car. We were on our way to SJO, flying out the next day. At the time of the accident, we didn't know where we were, so we didn't call INS to report it. We did call our insurance agent once we got to San Jose to let him know what had happened. He told us we'd have to file a report after we got back from the States. Upon doing so, he said we had a slim chance of getting our claim approved since we didn't report it initially. But much to our surprise, INS approved it and paid for all the repairs. Our car was in the shop for 1 month, and it took about that long for them to approve our claim. While being carless, we would make the 20 minute walk to the bus stop and then take a taxi home with all our goodies. Once we rented a car for 2 days. When you rely on a car to get around, it's really a pain to do without, especially when you live in the boonies. But my hubby also hitched a ride with a neighbor sometimes as most of them knew we were without a car.
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