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Put up in what, Carol? Brine? Wine? Sour cream?

 

Is it very different from pickled herring that one sees in a supermarket?

 

Cheers!

 

Paul M.

==

Day one the herring is salted. Day 2 cut up & put in vinegar brine in jars. Day 3 add onions & some spices if wish. Day 4 eat it. Some parts of Nova scotia add some pickling spices & sugar. Our area we don't. I worked summers in fish plant when in school & was one of the things we did.

Edited by Carol Nickerson

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Well, I feel like I've dodged the proverbial bullet. On several trips to the Maritimes, we were tempted to stop at one church supper or another that advertised Solomon Gundy (right?). How glad I am that we didn't.

 

It sounds like a down east version of the lutefisk(sp?) which Garrison Kielor(sp?) has spoken of on A Prairie Home Companion. He reported that the volunteer firefighters of Lake Woebegon made lutefisk every year for their fundraiser. After starting the batch, they had to burn their clothes.

 

I'll stick to the cod tongues.

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Day one the herring is salted. Day 2 cut up & put in vinegar brine in jars. Day 3 add onions & some spices if wish. Day 4 eat it. Some parts of Nova scotia add some pickling spices & sugar. Our area we don't. I worked summers in fish plant when in school & was one of the things we did.

 

Actually Carol, that sounds pretty much like the commercial thing I mentioned earlier: VITA (brand) Pickled Herring.

 

Every so often I will buy (and really do enjoy) a big jar of the version pickled in sour cream. I'd prolly eat it more often if it weren't quite so expensive. BTW, it seems to keep well for a good while in the 'fridge after it's been opened.

 

I don't find that it tastes awful, but then I also like stuff with lots of garlic in it; also Thai nam pla (a smelly fish sauce) used like salt there as a condiment.

 

Go figure.

 

Paul M.

==

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...and on the other hand, there's kim chee, also an acquired taste (and as anyone who's had it or smelled it can tell you, it's pretty odiferous!) A few years back, I was on a Washington State Ferry and had brought some kim chee to eat. One of my kids and I were both happily eating the stuff at a table in the back and every time someone walked by, they gave us strange looks. It took me a while to realize that they were identifying the source of the smell. Good times!

 

regards,

Gayle

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Carol, Amazonian natives hold a festival at which they shrink the severed heads of their enemies. Just cuz it's a festival don't make it palatable.

 

As for the kim chee, you're right, Gayle, that it's an acquired taste, but if you can find some that's not too fiery hot, it's actually pretty good.

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Carol, Amazonian natives hold a festival at which they shrink the severed heads of their enemies. Just cuz it's a festival don't make it palatable.

 

As for the kim chee, you're right, Gayle, that it's an acquired taste, but if you can find some that's not too fiery hot, it's actually pretty good.

Kimchi (kimchee) is excellent. Got hooked on it when in Korea.

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There's a funny episode of "King of the Hill" involving Lutefisk. I spent some time in Korea. Every family makes kimchee a little differently. They eat it every meal like Ticos eat gallo pinto. Not my cup of tea. They would eat whole cloves of raw garlic, the very strong hot kind. I tried it and thought I was gonna die.

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Dave, I think "fermented" cabbage is more like it. As Carol said, that wonderful Korean red pepper to taste, lots of garlic, salt, and maybe some fish sauce or dried fish (I don't use that: see Solomon Gundy above), and let it sit in a cool place for a few weeks. We have Korean red pepper powder and can get wonderful Nappa cabbage (and even daikon) here. One of the vendors at the feria verde in San Jose has some kimchee(expensive, though). Now you've all inspired me to make some when we're back from our boat trip.

 

And, Steve, your problem is that you just didn't drink enough shoju to wash it down!

 

regards,

Gayle

Edited by salish sea

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