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Hi everyone,

 

This time I actually searched and there's nothing about rose apples on the ARCR forums. A neighbor raved about them, then we couldn't find them, then this last week, the local (San Ramon) feria had them. It's one of those foods I suspect you either love or hate, and I'm with my neighbor on this one. My reaction was, "where have you been all of my life?"

 

The fruit I'm talking about is not what's often called "water apples." I've had them and have no doubt whatsoever that they're refreshing, but they don't really have much flavor, other than being crisp and refreshing.

 

Rose apples are completely different! Sweet, strongly perfumed with a rose scent, large hollow cavity with a fairly large seed, one neighbor said that they taste like you're eating perfume. The internet source I found says that people make a sort of jam out of them, which I cannot imagine, as they're really quite sweet to start with.

 

But I'd love to hear what others think and maybe introduce this tropical fruit (from India originally) and urge people to try it.

 

The link to info from Purdue University is below:

http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/rose_apple.html

 

regards,

Gayle

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Gayle,

 

Manzana-rosa is already in Costa Rica -and popular.

 

I follow a food blog run by a tico who is a librarian but loves to cook. His blog's name is Cocina Costarricense.

 

I checked his blog and there are four entries discussing manzana-rosa and how it is used. Here is a link to those entries:

 

http://recetasdecostarica.blogspot.com/search/label/manzana%20rosa

 

I really enjoy his blog cuz he is always discussing tico foods and recipes, explaining their history, and showing how to prepare them. Plus Luis also includes nice photographs, further illuminating each topic, fruit, vegetable, recipe, etc.

 

Better still, the entries are in spanish and I have learned a lot of new spanish from his explanations for how to make this or that dish, as well as names of different fruits, veggies, meats, etc., all in spanish. (And since we are already familiar in english with how recipes tend to be laid out and how they are prepared, it makes it simpler to absorb the spanish.)

 

Another bonus are the comments his followers post which allows me to see how everyday (not classroom) spanish actually goes down. Very enlightening, indeed!

 

So Gayle, with your newly augmented spanish skills I think this blog may help you a lot in your quest for further improving it..

 

Lemme noe what you think of it.

 

Cheers!

 

Paul M.

==

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Hi Paul,

 

What a great resource! (and, yep, I was actually able to read most of it.) And to everyone else, go to your local feria and buy one rose apple so you can taste it and let us know here what you think!

 

saludos cordiales,

Gayle

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Glad to hear that you could read most of it, Gayle. With a dictionary in hand to look up the unfamiliar words (which you will learn anyway because they are repeated in other recipes, too) you will surely soon be able to read and understand 98%+ of what Luis posts there. It's a great way to see spanish 'in action' as it were.

 

BTW, did you read any of the guests' comments? There are a number of followers who regularly reply and their use of spanish i a more casual way is important to become aware of.

 

And BTW2, I would be interested to hear what Tiffany and Rodrigo think of Luis' site, with regards to whether they believe it can help someone who is an english-first speaker and already studying spanish, learn it any faster.

 

Cheers!

 

Paul M.

==

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I've had a hard time finding pectin for making jam. The only place I've found it is at AutoMercado at $3 USD a box. I hear the Manzana Rosa is very rich in pectin and because of the mild taste, it can be used as a substitute for packaged pectin. I'm going to freeze some and give it a try the next time I make Sweet & Hot Pepper jam. I'm not sure how much of the Manzana Rosa to use, but trial and error is the only way to find out.

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Here's a link for a recipe for making your own pectin. Tells how long you can keep it in the fridge or freezer. Doesn't tell how much to use in your recipe, however it might be of interest to someone. I got it from the Food Network site.

 

http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/cda/recipe_print/0,1946,FOOD_9936_6460_RECIPE-PRINT-FULL-PAGE-FORMATTER,00.html

 

Let me know if this link doesn't work, or go to www.foodnetwork.com and search homemade pectin.

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Nice link, Shea. But I don't know whether Granny Smiths are readily available in CR, or can be had only some of the time.


It would be useful to learn what local fruits in CR there may be which are high in pectin and can be substituted for apples. Surely there must be some.


There are some orchards of warmth-tolerant Israeli apples in production in CR. I wonder if those (particularly the cultivars 'Anna' and 'Ein Schirmer') have a lot of pectin in them.


Maybe we could ask Luis González over on Cocina Costarricense to do a write-up on pectin there on his blog.

Just a thought...


Paul M.
==

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Shea, thanks for the suggestion. I've seen that recipe before, but the granny smith apples are a little out of my budget.

 

Gayle, that's a thought and certainly worth a try.

 

My research shows Cas and Guava are also rich in pectin and frequently used in jams and jellies. I'm going to give those a try as well and I'll post my results.

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When I priced apples here I thought they were all out of my budget! Good thing I don't like apples. (I'm a lousy Washingtonian.)

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Paul, yes, I love love love the Cocina Costarricence site, and agree that it is a great resource for improving one's Spanish as well as learning about food tico style. I actually haven't tried the manzana rosa, but will pick one up at the feria this week.

 

As far as regular apples, the esposo hates the ones imported from the US but loves the small ones from Chile that are more tart. I don't know whether they actually come from Chile, or if that's just where this type originates from, that's how the esposo describes them.

 

EDIT: Holy yum monsters, Batman, I just saw the recipe for "pastel de zuquini" ... yesssss

Edited by stewart.tb

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I'm a costa rican and believe it or not I have never tried one of them, but according to what people tell me, they are the fruits of the heavens, they just taste incredibly amazing. I might stop by a fruit shop and get myself one to see what's the deal about it.

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Whilst living on the farm, we planted thousands of trees including hundreds of varieties of fruit trees including many non commercial fruits not usually offered for sale, but never came accross this one either. One I did like and have been trying to find, is' Araza' or' Eugenia stipitata' which makes a great refresco.

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Hi crf,

 

Dunno, but here's the Wikipedia article:

 

Eugenia stipitata (Araza, Portuguese common names araçá, araçá-boi Portuguese pronunciation: [ɐɾɐˈsa ˈboj]) is a fruit tree native to Amazon Rainforest vegetation in Brazil. It has recalcitrant seeds which should not be grown in soil, but prefer semi-rotting wood. In any case, germanation is very slow, and may take 3-6 months.

The fruit is distinctive and very appealing, but also very acidic (pH 2.4, similar to lemons). It is usually used to make juice or for culinary purposes such as making jam. It is cultivated in California, but is not very commercially exploited due to the poor shipping ability of the fruits. Some are large (up to 750g).

The trees are small to medium sized and tolerate some flooding[1] and droughts of up to 2 months. They are hermaphroditic (possibly allogamous) and there is considerable interest in further developing the crop through selective breeding.

 

regards,

Gayle

 

ps to Marco: manzana rosas really are sweet and do have the flavor of roses, if you can imagine that. As I said in my initial post, people either love them or don't. But do try at least one and see what you think. I have never tasted anything like it! Probably the polar opposite of the fruit crf likes!

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