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I've never seen the Naranja Agria in the stores or ferias, but i have a friend who uses them for something.

 

Shea,

 

The Cubans us naranja agria to make mojo. The jusice i mixed with crushed row garlic, oil (olive maybe), pepper and herbs (not sure which but maybe thyme), and once it is all mixed together and the flavors meld that mojo is used to marinate pork in. Makes for fabulous roast pork!

 

Here is how to make mojo de naranja agria which was part of a recipe I found online for making pork chunks marinated in mojo de naranja agria:

 

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Make the Mojo: In a small bowl, whisk together the naranja agria, garlic, oregano, cumin, salt and pepper. Pour over the pork loin in the plastic bag. Seal bag, refrigerate for minimum 1 to 2 hours.

 

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Here is the link to the recipe if you are interested:

 

Masitas de Puerco (Mojo marinated, Grilled Pork Loin Chunks)

http://www.thehungry...rk-loin-chunks/

 

Even if you don't care for the above recipe, the instructions for making mojo de naranja agria can be used in addition to marinate pork, for beef, and chicken, too.

BTW, both Goya and Badia have bottles of Mojo de Naranja Agria in the grocery stores here but the home-made mojo it to die for.

HTH

 

Paul M.

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Two questions: What is row garlic?

 

Where would the bottled Mojo be found in the stores? Is it in the spice section or the juice section or somewhere else?

 

Thanks for the recipe. I won't be driving around looking for the fruit but might buy the bottled stuff.

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Two questions: What is row garlic?

 

'Row garlic' is garlic that was planted in rows. Or, maybe it was a typo I made and was supposed to be 'raw garlic'.

 

Where would the bottled Mojo be found in the stores? Is it in the spice section or the juice section or somewhere else?

 

Prolly to be found in with the ethnic stuff.

 

Thanks for the recipe. I won't be driving around looking for the fruit but might buy the bottled stuff.

 

I went online and looked around and found a label for the Badia Naranja Agria Mojo and it has far fewer ingredients than the recipe I cited and lots of preservatives.

 

Still I know that people in Florida tend to use the commercial produce because sour oranges seems fairly hard to come by. I do know that the Cubans in Tampa have been known to come and beg you for sour oranges if they discover your have a tree in your yard. So let that be a qualifier for fresh prepared mojo vs the bottled stuff. At least it sounds as if it's much easier to get sour oranges in CR than in Florida, if you know what to ask for.

 

Cheers!

 

Paul M.

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