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Jocotes ("Spanish plum") recipes?


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At the feria today in San Ramon (sorry, Paul, still no mangosteens), I stopped to ask about some bagged vegetables that were 1000 colones for a kilo. I asked in my bad Spanish how to cook them, and the vendor said, "No cocinar, son frutas. Jocotes. Son muy ricos."

 

I looked in "Sabor!" and on the internet, and, other than eating them out of hand, the recommendation is to cook them in their skins, remove the skins, and then cook them for a bit with a lot of sugar, some cinnamon and maybe cloves.

 

Anyone have other suggestions?

 

Thank you all!

 

regards,

Gayle

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At the feria today in San Ramon (sorry, Paul, still no mangosteens), I stopped to ask about some bagged vegetables that were 1000 colones for a kilo. I asked in my bad Spanish how to cook them, and the vendor said, "No cocinar, son frutas. Jocotes. Son muy ricos."

 

I looked in "Sabor!" and on the internet, and, other than eating them out of hand, the recommendation is to cook them in their skins, remove the skins, and then cook them for a bit with a lot of sugar, some cinnamon and maybe cloves.

 

Anyone have other suggestions?

 

Thank you all!

 

regards,

Gayle

 

Here is a link to some jocote recipes. Cocina Costarricense Actually, the site has lots of wonderful recipes for "comida tipica"

 

Buen provecho!

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To anyone reading this, get thee to a roadside vendor or a local market and buy some jocotes! I boiled them briefly to make them easier to skin. Texture is sort of like a slightly dry peach, but the flavor is like nothing else I've ever tasted. John, I agree with you about "why cook them when they're so good raw?". Interestingly, we had neighbors over yesterday, who have lived here for 3 and 8 years, and none of them had previously had them.

 

Thank you all!

 

regards,

Gayle

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The site will not let me edit the above post.

 

Sorry, I didn't notice the post asking whether or not the seeds need to be dried. If planting immediately, no, they don't. If keeping them for latr use, then, yes, they need to be washed and dried. On many rural roads they are used as 'living fences' so planting a few branches could be another option...

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Good suggestion CRF . . .

 

Planting a few branches as a fence is not a bad idea especially if you like the fruit and if you run across a variety that is particularly tasty or prolific to take some cuttings from.

 

Eventually you might be able to go into business making jocote jam or something.

 

Just FWIW . . .

 

Cheers!

 

Paul M.

==

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I would suggest looking for both varieties, if possible, for harvesting in both the dry and wet season.

Salish Sea, I read on the 'net "The red mombin (Jocote) is abundant in Mexico and Central America from sea-level up to elevations of 5000 or 6000 feet".

I just looked at our tree and flowers are starting to appear.

Edited by costaricafinca
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