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Great lesson,Tiffany - didn't you say you're a teacher?

 

My favorite is chunche - I'll have to remember that one cuz thingamajig is definitely in my vocabulary!

 

Well, I've had all the storm prep I can handle! Isaac can have whatever he wants - that much less to sell/pack/donate.

 

dem

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Hey Tiffany & Dem,

 

Y'all ought to look for a copy of this book:

 

A LO TICO

 

by author Alf Giebler who came to CR as a baby at the tender age of 10 months old and grew up here bilingual.

 

The book has been recently reprinted. It is a great overview of tico spanish including vocabularies and phrases and the categorizing of them that let you know which are everyday expressions, those that you should not use in polite social discourse, and those which are actually vulgar. This book also contains a list of words that are only found in Costa Rica.

 

Larry at Goodlight Books in Alajuela (around the corner from Jalapeño Central) usually stocks them. I also saw copies recently at our AltoMercado on the road to Poás.

 

This book will definitely help you understand a lot of your costarrican spanish that isn't found in your usual spanish textbook.

 

As I recall, the book runs around US$12.00 and will be money well spent if you want something that you can refer to to help figure out some of the seemingly incomprehensible things that ticos say.

 

HTH

 

Paul M.

==

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My question- for those who know- is "jue puchis" vulgar? I hear my novio use it all the time, and he has a dirty mouth. BUT he usually uses it around people who don't appreciate cursing instead of using "jue puta" I always forget to ask.

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Sounds good! For those of us still stateside, I just did a quick google. Amazon doesn't have if! Found one site it sold for $6,900 colones - but the site's in Spanish. :unsure: With my limited Spanish I'll need more time to figure things out before I hit the "purchase" button. :o So far that was the only site where I could buy less than lots of 10, 20, or more!

 

Sorry Dem,

 

I didn't say so before, but the book is in spanish.

 

And I have never seen it offered on Amazon.com.

 

It is published locally and not marketed outside CR.

 

It is pretty easy to find here, though.

 

HTH

 

Paul M.

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My question- for those who know- is "jue puchis" vulgar? I hear my novio use it all the time, and he has a dirty mouth. BUT he usually uses it around people who don't appreciate cursing instead of using "jue puta" I always forget to ask.

 

Lucy,

 

Some say yes. Some say no. I've had ticos tell me not to use it because it is vulgar. Others tell me, "Oh, everybody uses it."

 

I get the sense that it is like saying, 'sonnofabitch' or, 'crippity crap' in english.

 

HTH

 

Paul M.

==

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Paul: I'm sorry, did you say Goodlight was near ...................................... Jalapeños? Gee, I must've forgotten that, and now excuse me while I plan my long overdue burrito run. I mean book run.

 

Lucybelle: I've been trying to figure that out for the longest too, and I think it's subjective. The esposo will say, depending on present company and the situation: puta, hijo de puta, hijue pucha, jue pucha, jue puña, puta madre, or sonofabitch if he's feeling English-day. He will say the "pucha" versions around his 4yr old nephew, and says it's not really vulgar, but I've noticed that I"ve never heard him use any version around older ladies, for instance, so ... I don't know. He's obviously censoring himself to some degree around the grandma set, for whatever that's worth. Also, I notice that if I hear women use the term, a lot of times it's the watered down puña/pucha versions ...

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Paul: I'm sorry, did you say Goodlight was near ...................................... Jalapeños? Gee, I must've forgotten that, and now excuse me while I plan my long overdue burrito run. I mean book run.

 

A burrito run . . .??? [Ah-ha-ha- HAAA...] Where's dear Phyllis Diller and her raucous cackle when you really need it???

 

Yup, Goodlight Books is right around the corner from Jalapeños.

 

I guess no one ever told Alajuela not to put all it's eggs in one basket.

 

Cheers!

 

Paul M.

==

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Lucybelle: I've been trying to figure that out for the longest too, and I think it's subjective. The esposo will say, depending on present company and the situation: puta, hijo de puta, hijue pucha, jue pucha, jue puña, puta madre, or sonofabitch if he's feeling English-day. He will say the "pucha" versions around his 4yr old nephew, and says it's not really vulgar, but I've noticed that I"ve never heard him use any version around older ladies, for instance, so ... I don't know. He's obviously censoring himself to some degree around the grandma set, for whatever that's worth. Also, I notice that if I hear women use the term, a lot of times it's the watered down puña/pucha versions ...

 

I wrote this whole long response and the internet ate it. Well I guess brevity is my friend today.

 

I asked the novio and he says "jue puchis/punis/etc" is like saying "shoot" instead of "bad word". I asked if I could use it in my classroom and he said no, but it is okay to use in front of other people. I guess it has the severity of "crap" (like Paul mentioned). So I wouldn't say "crap!" in the classroom, but it doesn't matter too much around regular people.

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yeah, the "crap" analogy is exactly how I thought of it, too. I wouldn't say crap in a professional situation or in a kids' class, even though it's not actually what I would call vulgar. Actually I wouldn't even say it in a class of adults, at least not with the lower levels.

 

Hey, do you find that women seem to curse a lot less here than the men, and if they do, they seem to curse ... I don't know, at that softer level? It's just one of the many gender differences I notice here. Lots of people will say how advanced CR is in regards to gender equality, how different it is in comparison to surrounding countries, in their opinion, but I do notice lots and lots of little things that to me, como gringa, really mark the gender roles.

Edited by stewart.tb

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Yup I definitely notice that. But it might be because most ticos I know are men. Most of the females I know are older, more religious, and that kind of makes them less likely to curse to begin with. Though, I honestly find it a little strange to hear women say "mae". Even in my classroom I hear lots of boys say it, but hardly any girls. There's plenty of times when I think that CR is the USA stuck in the '50s.

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Yes! I've so wondered about the "mae" thing ... why don't women say it? I do hear some young girls saying it, but it basically seems to part of The Man's World here. And it's nothing vulgar at all ... I mean, women say "dude" or "mate" in English. It does seem like "nice women" are expected to have "nice speech" here. Geez,my friends in the states would drop the F-bomb and it didn't mean we weren't "nice women".

 

I remember a woman from Peru once told me that there was a masculine way of speaking and a feminine, and she was distressed/annoyed because her husband (from Israel) was learning too much of the "feminine" way from speaking with her, so she forbade him to speak Spanish! WTH? She was kind of off in a lot of ways, so I just ignored it at the time, but maybe I'm starting to get a tiny inkling of what she may have been talking about.

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I mentioned the "mae" thing to a bunch of Tico friends, and they all said "no, not just a guy thing - girls use it just about as much"

These were mostly 20 and 30 somethings

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I mentioned the "mae" thing to a bunch of Tico friends, and they all said "no, not just a guy thing - girls use it just about as much"

These were mostly 20 and 30 somethings

 

Yeah I've heard people say that too. But, I've experienced differently. And most of the people I hang out with are 20s 30s.

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Very interesting conversation. It makes me want to go back to my dear country. I have been laughing a lot!

 

About the word "mae" I would say that it has its background.

The word was "maje" which means stupid or bad ass. It evolved and bacame "mae" which means dude now. I guess that is the reason why women do not use it very often.

 

There is an expression that is very common "No seas tan maje" this means: do not be stupid, man!

 

 

Pura vida!

Edited by Vanesa

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Now that is enlightening! I always thought "maje" was just the old school version of "mae", I never knew that there had been an evolution in the meaning. I learned something today, and it's still morning time.

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