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When I was a kid in the beach area south of LA, pachuco was a gang member. I've never heard that word used for anything else until now. Another case of Spanish vs. CR Spanish, I guess.

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¿Qué significa “pachuco” por favor? (I won't ask about those other phrases - yet!) ;)

 

dem

When I was a kid in the beach area south of LA, pachuco was a gang member. I've never heard that word used for anything else until now. Another case of Spanish vs. CR Spanish, I guess.

 

Pachuco is Costa Rican slang. You can't use it that word to mean slang in any other country (to my knowledge).

 

I've told many friends that you can be fluent in Spanish and not understand anything ticos say. There's a video with a tico giving a gringo direction in pachuco. Let me see if I can dig it up...

 

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bwahahahaha, Gringo Pinto is my favorite! Never get tired of watching that. "La dirección es un queque!" I still will jokingly say, "Sí, claro!!" in the gringo's accent to mi esposo if I only half understand something.

 

Hey, I'm happy, I haven't watched that in a long time, and there's a huge difference in understanding, yay!

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bwahahahaha, Gringo Pinto is my favorite! Never get tired of watching that. "La dirección es un queque!" I still will jokingly say, "Sí, claro!!" in the gringo's accent to mi esposo if I only half understand something.

 

Hey, I'm happy, I haven't watched that in a long time, and there's a huge difference in understanding, yay!

 

Yeah and there's that other video too... umm...

 

Of all those I don't ever hear "zarpe", "dele viaje", "jumas". Everything else I hear almost daily! :D

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hahahaah, like, like! I'd never seen that before. I hear zarpe alll the time, but no, dele viaje I've never heard, and jumas I think i probably saw online, because it's familiar, but I can't remember actually hearing it. I haven't heard "guava" for suerte either. There are a lot of other terms that my Mexican friends tell me are definitely tico Spanish, like brete/bretear, jama, estoy bateando, of course chunche, etc.

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Que breteada!!! jaja Yup! Jumas I never heard before, but I hear/use tapis all the time. They say it's for "drunks" but it also just means being drunk. Estoy tapis. Does jumas work that way too? I thought cochino was tico, but evidently it's in all Spanish. I don't remember if it's in the video or not but I also hear "vamos jalando" or "jalense!" etc. I don't know if that's tico or not, I think it is.

 

Lots of times when I hear words/phrases I always have to ask "is that normal Spanish?" ;)

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sí, the esposo says, "voy jalando" when he's leaving work sometimes, and I hear "jale, jale!" always with the hand motion for, go on then, get out of here, leave, or something like that. Usually it's done jokingly. I don't know about jumas. Yeah, a lot of times the only way I find out something isn't just regular Spanish is b/c one of my Mexican friends will suddenly say, "Huh??"

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You beat me to it, Shea ... Boy! Oh boy! Oh boy!! I can see I've been using the wrong book for my Spanish studies. Gringo Pinto? ... my ears are hurting trying to understand any of that! Please, tell me that's an exaggerated cartoon.

 

If not, anybody have a pachuco diccionario? :wacko:

 

dem

Edited by demgems

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You beat me to it, Shea ... Boy! Oh boy! Oh boy!! I can see I've been using the wrong book for my Spanish studies. Gringo Pinto? ... my ears are hurting trying to understand any of that! Please, tell me that's an exaggerated cartoon.

 

If not, anybody have a pachuco diccionario? :wacko:

 

dem

 

Jaja! In watching the Gringo Pinto, I probably only hear about 50% of that daily. Some of the phrases I've never heard used. The other video "que bueno ser tico" has much more commonly used words and phrases.

 

But yeah- pachuco you just gotta learn when you get here. My novio still introduces me to his friends like "she speaks Spanish, but she's learning Costa Rican!" :P

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My novio still introduces me to his friends like "she speaks Spanish, but she's learning Costa Rican!" :P

Lucybelle, that's funny! There's really that much difference, huh?

 

hahahaah, like, like! I'd never seen that before. I hear zarpe alll the time, but no, dele viaje I've never heard, and jumas I think i probably saw online, because it's familiar, but I can't remember actually hearing it. I haven't heard "guava" for suerte either. There are a lot of other terms that my Mexican friends tell me are definitely tico Spanish, like brete/bretear, jama, estoy bateando, of course chunche, etc.

And, Okay Tiffany. If you're going to "speak" pachuco, at least be nice to us gringos and "translate." Like, what's brete/bretear, estoy bateando, and chunche? jajaja (see, I do speak Spanish! I have to admit, it did take a few of those posts for me to figure out what ja ja meant)

 

I have to say, at the beginning of the post I thought "oh well, this one's not relevant for me" but now however, it has taken a most interesting and informative turn! More of this day-to-day culture please! It's great; I love hearing you gals talk about everyday life happenings. Nice and light info - gives my brain a rest. thanks.

 

dem

Edited by demgems

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Guide to Costa Rican Spanish by Christopher Howard I think you can buy it in San Jose.

Missy,

 

I have that book but I didn't come across any like they've mentioned here. Are these slangs in the book? I'll have to highlight them if they are!

 

dem

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Demgems, there are some sites online that have slang expressions, if you just google Costa Rica Spanish slang/pachuco or something like that. I warn you though, it can be overwhelming ... I remember my head swimming trying to make sense of it. Gringo Pinto isn't all that exaggerated, it's just that it's all put together in one place for the video ... you don't usually hear it all together like that. The first time I saw that video, I only understood the gringo. Barely. And my accent was about that bad, jajajaja.

 

Let's see, bretear is the verb for "to work" and brete is just the noun, so "job". Sometimes mi esposo also says "estoy aquí en el yugo" (I'm here, under the yoke) when he's at work, the reference being to the oxen who are yoked together to pull the old-fashioned carts here, but that's not pachuco, that's just him, haha. Librarian. There you go.

 

Estoy bateando means literally "I'm batting", which means something like I"m taking a wild guess, I'm swinging at a meaning here.

Chunche = thingamajig, whatchamacallit. Super common!

Jama = something to eat, food.

And that one always reminds me of jupa, which means head. The esposo and his chess buddies say, "le di por la jupa" (I gave it to him on the head) about an opponent, which basically means "I kicked his ass", if they win well in chess. Yeah, chess, they play rough. (BUT: don't say "jupa de pollo" ... literally head of the chicken ... unless you want to talk about a certain part of the male anatomy.)

Voy jalando ... oh geez, literally it's something like "I go pulling", but it seems to just mean I'm out of here, I'm leaving fast.

 

I really don't know all that much pachuco or slang, and a lot of it I forget quickly. Like I just learned a phrase the other day when teh hubby was talking with one of his brothers, and I thought it was really clever, but now? Gone.

 

Today I learned a version of "speak of the devil": hablando del rey de Roma, y el se asoma. "Speaking of the king of Rome, and he appears." (Or, literally, he "appears himself", thanks to the lovely "se", which still ties my brain in knots.) That's not pachuco, I just thought it was cute. The rhyme sucked me in with its easy-to-remember-ness.

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