Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
rennagentry

How can I become a real estate agent in Costa Rica?

Recommended Posts

Isn't it great to be living in Latin American countries. Yes, they enact laws and pretend that they have rules, but the reality is that nobody enforces these laws or rules. These are the truly free democracies where people are bound by their own morals in how they conduct their lives.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And RainyC, that is what makes one's due diligence with many things in CR so extra important.

 

Business and many other things are done via word-of-mouth in CR so it is really very important to make friendships and acquaintances with both gringos and ticos whom you can trust as reliable.

 

It's analogous to navigating with landmarks in CR: The more of them you learn, the easier it is to get around. (My apologies to GPS aficionados.)

 

¡Pura Vida!

 

Paul M.

==

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dana, I think that you are making things more difficult than they really are...

 

I am a Real Estate Agent

 

There, I am now officially a real estate agent!

 

Mark's statement above has been running around in my head ever since he posted it.

 

I finally gave in and composed this reply which is a parody of the song "I'm An Indian Too" sung by Ethel Merman in in the original production of ANNIE GET YOUR GUN. I'm sure there are a few of us here on the Forums who are old enough to remember this famous old musical.

 

 

My parody is called "I'm In Real Estate Too":

 

Like Canadians, Gringos and, Britons, too

Like those other guys

I'm in Real Estate, too

Like you-ooo-ooo

Like you-ooo-ooo

Some ticoland summer's day

Without a care

I may sell a slot

To someone, devil-may-care

And I'll move bargain lots, retirement plots, hidden spots

Which will go to prove

I'm a realtor, too-ooo-ooo

Just like you

 

=======

 

My sincere appologies to Irving Berlin and Miss Merman!

 

Here is the original version, sung by Ethel Merman.

 

Annie Get Your Gun - "I'm An Indian Too" - Ethel Merman

 

 

 

Hope you liked my little parody.

 

Paul M.

==

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have dealt with many CR real estate agents that work with Coldwell Banker, Century 21 or Remax. Most have been young men or women from Canada or the United States and many were not legal residents. They all dealt with professional architects, builders, lawyers etc and they were all extremely professional.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have met some people here in real estate that were also in RE back in the states, and they do tend to bring the same level of professionalism to the job here.

 

Its the ones that are only in it for the $$$ that you have to watch out for. Research their background thoroughly....

 

 

Dana

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I were in the market for Real Estate, I would ask to see the cédula of the agent. If he/she were not a permanent resident and free to work, I would not engage their services. I also would spread the word. If it's illegal to work, it's illegal to work! And I wouldn't count on the government not enforcing the laws. They are starting to crack down on many violations that were previously overlooked.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But Shea all of these agents work for store front, reputable, real estate firms that are part of the communities they do business in. I am sure that the majority of people that come to CR and walk into these offices inquiring about real estate are only interested in great service. Most have no clue about cedula's and residency issues and could care less. Less rules means more freedom.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The flip side to this is having respect for the rules of the country you are in. Costa Rica doesn't generally have the means to enforce many of their laws, but that doesn't make it okay to ignore them or call it freedom when they cannot do so. Perhaps these ILLEGAL workers are filling a need for gringos who don't know any better or know better & don't care. Most Ticos I know would not be happy with the outright disrespect shown by ignoring their laws. It is one thing if they do it, something else entirely when a gringo does it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You know sometimes I think countries like CR and Mexico only enact some laws to appease their big brother the United States. The reason the tico's and most gringo's don't follow them is because they realize this. Even if the Latin Americans don't agree they still bend to the will of the yankee.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In some ways, like the banking fiasco currently taking place in Costa Rica, I agree. When it comes to working illegally, I disagree. No one should presume that their desire to live in Costa Rica is more important than the laws Costa Rica has set forth. If you cannot afford to live in CR without working, I think you need to find a way to become a legal worker (via work permit, as lucybelle has done, or telecommuting as I've done for almost 6 years) or go back to where you came from. Personally, I see gringos working illegally as exploiters of Costa Rica.

Edited by ReevesTribe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But Shea all of these agents work for store front, reputable, real estate firms that are part of the communities they do business in. I am sure that the majority of people that come to CR and walk into these offices inquiring about real estate are only interested in great service. Most have no clue about cedula's and residency issues and could care less. Less rules means more freedom.

 

If these people are illegal, the firms are not reputable. Have you actually asked these "illegal" workers their statuses?

 

T

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've found out that there are a lot of companies here that hire gringos as a sort of independent contractor, they call it servicios profesionales. The company's line is that if you offer servicios profesionales, you're outside the categories required for legal work visas, that it's "different", that it's not illegal. I've seen a lot of gringos here who hire on believing that. (That's besides the many who work knowing full well the (il)legalities) The companies tell you that the work laws apply to "employees", not "independent contractors". They'll even tell you to go get a book of receipts to pay your taxes legally, and tell you where to register for that, so the worker has the impression that everything is above board. The company gets out of paying CAJA, aguinaldo, etc. is free of the hiring/firing laws, and the worker thinks (sometimes) that s/he's in a different category, not doing anything wrong. There are regs governing the difference between an employee and servicios profesionales, but many "independent contractors" technically do not meet the requirements for servicios profesionales, but rather for employees. However, the workers are often unaware of this, and happily work on, doing their border runs every 90 days.

 

This surprised me when I first started seeing it. Lots of folks were trying to convince me it was OK to work before getting permanent residency. (or what I have, temporal, libre de condición, via marriage to a tico) "Just declare yourself an independent contractor, and work. That's different." I'm no expert on servicios profesionales or anything, maybe someone else can shed some more light on it, but I did do a lot of research into the work/family/residency laws ... being the paranoid type that I am, jaja. From what I see, there are quite a few gringos who have the idea they're working legally, but ... well, let's just say I wouldn't want to take the chance of messing with that kind "legality".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the thing you need to realize is that even if someone is working here legally in the real estate biz and they are unethical, immoral and downright criminal - there is very little you can if you get snagged by one. They know you, as a gringo, (their biggest target) will most likely just go back where you came from or if you do try to stay and fight it out - that time is on their side and in all likelihood you will either die before it goes to court or the court will do nothing. In other words, they will get away with murder and will then go on to commit even more nasty crimes. As long as they got your money (commission) they do not care. PERIOD.

And if you try and warn other folks about their shady dealings - they will take YOU to court for defamation - even if what you say is the God's honest truth.

Nowhere else does the saying - buyer beware - take on more merit than the real estate biz in this country.

Now, I am sure there are some decent folks, I even know a few, but it is the bad apples that spoil it for everyone. opps, another cliche.

All characters appearing in this work are fictitious. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Verify the credentials of the person you are dealing with. Get references from people you trust. Beware if the person is too smooth. Pray a lot. Carry a rabbit's foot. lol (Oh,no! Forget the rabbit's foot. That's too gross!)

 

There's really no way you can absolutely protect yourself from an unscrupulous RE agent or anyone else. Just do as much checking as you can and be prepared to be taken once in awhile.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But Shea all of these agents work for store front, reputable, real estate firms that are part of the communities they do business in. I am sure that the majority of people that come to CR and walk into these offices inquiring about real estate are only interested in great service. Most have no clue about cedula's and residency issues and could care less. Less rules means more freedom.

 

Its soo easy to have a sign printed up with the name of a reputable RE company from the US, and not have any real affiliation with same. Most real estate sold between Ticos is not through a RE office anyway, these 'store fronts' are mainly targeted at the expats that see a familiar sign and think its the same as in the US, but its not. Like I said above, it varies, you could find a legitimate RE office and get great service, or you could end up getting ripped off with absolutely NO recourse about it, in which case Less rules means more freedom to steal.

 

DJ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.