Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I think that they don't want us to be able to read what all the additives are, ja ja.

m

 

Hey, I was just going to say that!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Julie, thanks for pinpointing the map!

My pleasure! (you may notice a number of other useful pins, like the muy barata farmacia in San Pedro)

:-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very interesting thread. Reading your many posts on the pejibaye fruit has really peaked my interest!  Since I can't sleep I thought I'd do some research.

 

Boy, Tiffany, you are so right.  Pejibaye is a really good food.  It has 7 of the 8 essential amino acids - lacking only tryptophan.  I also learned that their peak season is Sept to April.  Lucky me - they'll be available when I come for my first visit in January!

 

Mayanca and Paul - the pejibaye soup and bisque y'all described sounds yummy.  And, Lucybelle, eating them with mayo sounds just fine to me! Good food - can't wait to try it.

  

Julia Morton has some interesting info in her book "Fruits of Warm Climates."  Check out this link 

http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/index.html

 

dem

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This has been such an interesting discussion for newbies, wannabes, and those who have lived here for years. One of the difficulties in adjusting to life here is learning about different foods and doing without the ones we are familiar with. The more we can learn, the easier it will be to adapt. At least it makes us a bit more amenable to trying something new and perhaps finding a new food passion.

 

We need more threads like this. I hope as people have questions they might post them to encourage discussion and sharing of information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
... Julia Morton has some interesting info in her book "Fruits of Warm Climates." Check out this link

http://www.hort.purd...rton/index.html

 

Dem,

 

Once you get to CR check the used bookstores for this book:

 

Sabor!: A Guide to Tropical Fruits and Vegetables and Central American Foods, by Carolina Avila and Marilyn Root; Publicaciones de Las Américas S.S., Grecia, Alajuela, Costa Rica; 1997.

 

A wonderful book with clear line drawings and plentiful explanations of the fresh ingredients (fruits and veggies) that you will encounter in Costa Rica (and Central America), plus how to use them along with lots of recipes. This book is very thorough, including a section on meats, the cuts and their names in central america. Also offers an extensive bilingual list of food and cooking terms in english with the spanish translation next to it. Has oven temps and measurement coversions, as well. I highly recommend this cookbook. And it's a fun 'read', too. Buy several copies to bring home as souvenirs/gifts for your friends. (You'll wish you

had if you don't.) In english, 218 pages.

 

 

Ask Larry Coulter, the owner of Goodlight Books in Alajuela if he has or can get you a copy of this title. Even a used one if that's all there is.

 

I think it is out of print now but worth looking for since Sabor is a really a very good reference.

 

And I'm going to look for the Julia Morton book you suggested. I wasn't aware of it.

 

Cheers!

 

Paul M.

==

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

...Once you get to CR check the used bookstores for this book:

 

Sabor!: A Guide to Tropical Fruits and Vegetables and Central American Foods[/b], by Carolina Avila and Marilyn Root; Publicaciones de Las Américas S.S., Grecia, Alajuela, Costa Rica; 1997.

 

I've seen y'all mention that book before. I just ordered it from Amazon. Probably in English but that's OK. Not sure I'm ready to tackle a Spanish cook book yet! Thanks for the suggestion Paul.

 

And Shea, I THOROUGHLY agree - this discussion is great. Such good info for those of us imagining, and trying to learn, what day-to-day life is going to be like. Enjoying it all,

 

dem

Edited by demgems

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
... I've seen y'all mention that book before. I just ordered it from Amazon. Probably in English but that's OK. Not sure I'm ready to tackle a Spanish cook book yet!

 

Dem,

 

It's less a cookbook (altho is is) than it is a reference with explanations of the different fruits one encounters in the tropics and what they are used for.

 

It is in english and it is a fun read for its topic.

 

Maybe you'll feel like giving us a book report about it later on.

 

Cheers!

 

Paul M.

==

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Dem,

 

It's less a cookbook (altho is is) than it is a reference with explanations of the different fruits one encounters in the tropics and what they are used for.

 

It is in english and it is a fun read for its topic.

 

Maybe you'll feel like giving us a book report about it later on.

 

Cheers!

 

Paul M.

==

Yeah, Paul, I got that it was more of a reference book; that's what really intrigued me. I love tropical fruits and am always amazed at how few people in my circle here at home have never heard of, much less eaten, a papaya...have never eaten a mango or cracked open a fresh coconut or even cut up a fresh pineapple! I guess that's just a small part of what separates the adventurers from the stay-put-ers!

 

I'll definitely give my feedback once I get a look at the book.

 

Later,

 

dem

Edited by demgems

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So hey guys . . .

 

Will there still be any mangosteens left at theAlajuela féria when I get there this week? Or are they done for the season.

 

What's coming in strong right now?

 

Just curious . . .

 

Paul M.

==

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Dem,

 

It's less a cookbook (altho is is) than it is a reference with explanations of the different fruits one encounters in the tropics and what they are used for.

 

It is in english and it is a fun read for its topic.

 

Maybe you'll feel like giving us a book report about it later on.

 

Cheers!

 

Paul M.

==

As requested, here's my report...

 

What a wonderful suggestion I was given and I pass it on to you.  A must-read if you're planning a move to Costa Rica.  Buy the book, "Sabor!: A Guide to Tropical Fruits and Vegetables and Central American Foods" by Caroline Avila and Marilyn Root.  It was printed in Costa Rica but I found it on Amazon.com, used in excellent condition, for $7.50 including shipping.

 

"Part of knowing a "culture" is becoming familiar with it's food."  That's from the Preface by Marilyn Root.  This little book will arm you with knowledge.  Whether shopping in the féria or ordering in a restaurant you'll have a better understanding of local foods.  The Introduction gives a quick overview of the names of typical Costa Rican dishes and brief explanations of what they are.  There's advice on how to read the menu and how the tip and local tax are both automatically included on your bill.  How to get the best deals by asking about the daily "special" and by asking for the "Spanish language" menus which frequently have clearer descriptions of the food selections and sometimes better prices.

 

The end of the book contains INVALUABLE CHARTS you'll want to keep for handy reference.  They include a list of emergency substitutions; conversion charts for Fahrenheit to Centigrade; measurements and their metric equivalents.  Additionally, the formulas are provided so you can easily convert any measurement you might need.

 

...There's a chart of meat cuts and products; a listing of poultry parts; fish most commonly found in the local area.  All are identified in both English and Spanish.

 

In between is what I call the "meat of the nut" - an alphabetical listing of fruits and veggies by English names (translated into Spanish) with clear line drawings so you can easily recognize each produce.  There's a brief description / history of each item followed by some recipes to enjoy.  (For example, following "coco" was a recipe for Coconut Rice.  I tried it and it was delicious! I love brown rice anyway but with the blend of coconut, fresh ginger and garlic this rice was good enough to "stand alone.")

 

Lastly, again at the end, are recipes for Costa Rican favorites such as Corn Tortillas, Costa Rican Christmas Tamales, and their "national dish," Gallo Pinto.

 

A MUST-READ for everyone contemplating a trip to CR whether for a brief vacation or for a new way life.  To quote the author, "¡Buen Provecho!"

 

dem

 

P.S.

Paul, thank you so much for your suggestion. Within the few pages of this little "cookbook" are real nuggets of CR culture!  I was so impressed and inspired that I started a new thread in Moving to Costa Rica titled "Must Read List" - books recommended by experienced expats.

 

I hope many of you will share your wisdom with those of us thirsting to learn about ¡Pura Vida!

Edited by demgems

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ha! Another fruit I'll look for at the feria on Fri (if it's not too late). Thanks, Paul, for the heads up about mangosteens.

 

Gayle,

 

A friend in Grecia said she'd seen some selling in their féria there, so apparently they are in season.

 

Be sure to choose ones with bright green stems and not dried brown ones. They will be fresher. ... And mangosteens don't last all that long once picked.

 

If you find some let us know your impression of them and how you like them.

 

Cheers!

 

Paul M.

==

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hola All,

 

I have only eaten pejibayes elaborated into a delicious bisque, which I mentioned in an earlier post. I have never eaten them just boiled with mayo like are found at the féria or at the super mercado.

 

Do the boiled ones tend to be stringy at all? -Like with fibers that get caught between one's teeth?- Or are they reasonably smooth-textured?

 

Just curious.

 

Paul M.

==

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.