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Hi everyone,

 

Wikipedia said they're the fruit of a peach palm Any suggestions about how to serve them, other than quartered and with a little mayonesa on them?

 

regards,

Gayle

Edited by salish sea

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they are the fruit from a type of coconut tree - and they are something like 98% fat. Not worth it in my book, but plenty of folks like them. You usually have to boil them in salted water, then do something with them. Some eat them straight, add mayo, grate them and make a sort of flour, etc.

the nut is edible as well.

there are a ton of recipes out there

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They are little globes of tasty deliciousness that make a party in your mouth, that's what they are. We just bought some raw today, and I will be crockpotting those bad boys tomorrow with some salt and olive oil. Pejis are the only food on earth that can convince me to eat mayo. When I get tired of them cooked, quartered, and mayo'd then I'll look into other ways of eating them.

 

I know ... totally useless post, I have no pertinent information of varied recipe ideas other than JUST EAT THEM. I just had to jump on the peji bandwagon. It's my favorite food here.

 

Also: yes, they are a really high calorie food, but they're also supposedly one of the most nutritionally complete foods. Yum.

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Gayle, you can buy one at your local supermarket or maybe even at the feria to see if you like it before you invest the time to cook them yourself. They are reddish or yellowish roundish golf-ball-sized-ish with thin stripes on them. You will find them in a bin of hot oily water, cooking away in the store or feria. Peel it, take out the pit and slice or quarter it. Hard to describe what they are like, but yummy! If you do decide you like them, it's a lot cheaper to buy them on the stem at the feria and cook them yourself.

 

I don't know how long they need to cook. Stewart.tb? Also, how long will they keep? As you said, Yum! Where did you get all the info on nutrition, etc.?

 

The only place I've seen them raw was at the feria in Atenas. The Tibás feria doesn't seem to have them at all. Dang!

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they are the fruit from a type of coconut tree - and they are something like 98% fat. Not worth it in my book, but plenty of folks like them. You usually have to boil them in salted water, then do something with them. Some eat them straight, add mayo, grate them and make a sort of flour, etc.

the nut is edible as well.

there are a ton of recipes out there

 

I can't say I know this fruit, but I will look for it. I want to point out that all fats are not automatically bad. Some fats, in limited quantity, are very healthy and necessary. Just as there is good and bad cholesterol, there are good and bad fats. I've read a little on this and it's not clear which are good or bad. In general animal fats are bad, but I'm not sure if all fruit type fats are considered good. This does not mean eat all you want as you still get the calories!

 

Jim

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Pejis are less greasy if you cook them at home in boiling salted water just until a fork easily pierces them. We prefer the slightly unripe fruit, as it is less starch/dry tasting. When we buy or pick a stem of pejis we look for one that has a quantity of full size but still greenish fruits. They are great with guacamole on top..some lemon/lime juice also. Be very careful to peel them as the spines are like needles and are sometimes embedded within the fruit when it falls from the tree. There is a wonderful soup you can make with left over cooked ones. First saute onion, garlic, sweet pepper, culantro and add in enough stock or consomme so that you can throw a few cut up pejis and the rest of ingredients into your blender and make a smooth liquidy puree...Then reheat with enough stock to make a soup and if you like, throw in some cream too. This is a very delicious soup. Don't forget the salt and pepper. The cooked pejis will keep on top of the stove in their cooking water if you bring them to a boil once or twice a day, for about 5 days. Again, we like the texture and flavor of the greenish stage much better for just eating, but the ripe ones are great in the soup. This is the same palm that commercial palm hearts come from, because it has multiple and regenerating trunks, and was a staple for indigenous peoples from the Amazon up through Nicaragua in pre columbian times. Scarlet Macaws love them

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I've only had them boiled in salt water and ate them straight-up, no mayo. They have a mild buttery and nutty flavor. Not strong or pungent tasting. I imagine that they would make a sopa muy rica!

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Undoubtedly true that they are an acquired taste..I've never eaten the greasy looking pejjis sold in the markets, but they look quite unappealing. I forgot to add one item in the soup recipe,,,add a couple of cut up tomatoes to your saute before blending.

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I bet they'd be fantastic in soup. I'll try to save some from this batch and try that.

 

I have to say I feel the opposite about the green-colored ones ... we've usually found that the greenies have more of a translucent look to the "meat", seem a bit odd in texture ... almost a slight crispness or slipperiness, hard to explain, but we often end up tossing remnants of the green ones to my (very happy) Labrador. If I'd only tried that type, I'd have been convinced that I don't like pejibayes at all.

 

We prefer the bright reddish and orangey ones. The texture is much nicer, and the taste ... riiiiico. A couple of vendors at the ferias have told us that the "rayados", or "striped" ones, are the most rico, and I've found this to be true.

 

Pejis kind of have a texture similar to potatoes or yuca, but with much more flavor. Sometimes they make me think of pumpkin, but they really are unique and you just have to try them. They are really filling, you don't have to eat many of them to feel nice and full.

 

Shea, I can't exactly remember the cooking time, because I do them in the crockpot rather than on top of the stove, which is less exact and much more forgiving if you leave things in longer. I think the guy told us an hour boiling on the stove the first time we tried it, and I just adjusted for the crockpot and did a couple of hours or more. He also told us to leave a couple still attached to the stem, and when the stem just comes off when you try to lift them out of the water, they're ready. I use the slow cooker for all kinds of things here that I never did in the states, even baked potatoes and beets. I'll update after I finish making this batch of pejis.

 

I saw the nutritional info on several different sites, including one that was a scientific study on foods/diet in Latin America. I remember they're incredibly high in vitamins A and C, are high fiber, and that they are apparently a very "complete" food, nutritionally. I remember there was a lot of info out there, but don't remember many details.

 

Tiffany

Edited by stewart.tb

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I had a bisque de pejibaye once at a restaurant. A tico friend encouraged me to order it; said it was a real treat for ticos and he thought I would like it. I did!

 

Imagine shrimp or logster bisque (i.e., sopa espesa) overall but with a flavor not unlike pumpkin rather than of seafood. It was delicious.

 

Here is a recipe for Bisque Pejibaye that I found. It's the third recipe down. It looks pretty much like the one I had.

 

Paul M.

==

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