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So, the Supreme Court upheld the law. Anybody know how this will effect expats? From what I know, prior to the law passing, expats were exempt, but I do not know if there has been any change to this.

 

Any comments?

 

Dana

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All I know is I'm still under my dad's insurance since I'm 25. It's awesome! I think that that insurance covers me here but I'm not 100% sure.

 

I'm going to go swim in a pool full of free birth control pills :D

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Dana ... I have been wonder that also if I would be required to buy insurance I can not use ... best case, there is an exemption for people who physically are not in the country ... worst case you pay the "tax" and still get care in CR. I am hoping for the exemption.

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From what I've been able to find, expats are exempt IF they have a foriegn income. We do not. Our income comes from the states even though we have residency here so we will have to pay for health care. It also seems you only qualify to be exempt if you live 330 days a year out of the country. So I'm guessing many of us will be forced to pay.

 

For our family it seems we'll be stuck paying around $4,000 a year in health insurance we can't use.

 

If you do not get health insurance in 2014 you will be fined a min. of $95 a person which isn't bad. But by 2016 it can be up to $2,000 per person in the family.

 

Slightly frustrating.

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From what I've been able to find, expats are exempt IF they have a foriegn income. We do not. Our income comes from the states even though we have residency here so we will have to pay for health care. It also seems you only qualify to be exempt if you live 330 days a year out of the country. So I'm guessing many of us will be forced to pay.

 

For our family it seems we'll be stuck paying around $4,000 a year in health insurance we can't use.

 

If you do not get health insurance in 2014 you will be fined a min. of $95 a person which isn't bad. But by 2016 it can be up to $2,000 per person in the family.

 

Slightly frustrating.

 

Thanks for the information, do you have cites to any sources?

 

Dana

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Here is a link to something I found: Issues Concerning Expatriate Employees Under ACA, but it concerns employees working outside the US mostly. Evidently expat retirees are kinda overlooked.

 

http://www.ciab.com/...et.aspx?id=2102

 

And here is a section from the PACA itself, in the usual legal mumbo jumbo:

 

 

‘‘(4) INDIVIDUALS RESIDING OUTSIDE UNITED STATES OR

RESIDENTS OF TERRITORIES.—Any applicable individual shall be

treated as having minimum essential coverage for any

month—

‘‘(A) if such month occurs during any period described

in subparagraph (A) or ( B) of section 911(d)(1) which is applicable to the individual, or

‘‘( B) if such individual is a bona fide resident of any

possession of the United States (as determined under section 937(a)) for such month.

 

I actually could not find S.911(d)(1) mentioned above. (Oh, its in the IRS code)

Edited by DanaJ

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The thing is -- if you are a retiree collecting Social Security, you are covered under Medicare. Doesn't that mean that in this case, you are already "covered?"

 

Basically, I'm not going to worry about this until it is more clear who pays what.

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For our family it seems we'll be stuck paying around $4,000 a year in health insurance we can't use.

 

If you do not get health insurance in 2014 you will be fined a min. of $95 a person which isn't bad. But by 2016 it can be up to $2,000 per person in the family.

 

Slightly frustrating.

 

Regardless of the health care bill, you have to pay taxes to the USA on any income. For those with foreign income, they get a double whammy- taxes from USA and other country. Yes with the health care it will be more taxes, but that's what you get for holding a USA passport. If it's that bad, get CR citizenship and renounce your USA one.

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Isn't there a sizeable exemption before you have to pay U.S. income tax on money earned in another country? Has that exemption disappeared?

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Regardless of the health care bill, you have to pay taxes to the USA on any income. For those with foreign income, they get a double whammy- taxes from USA and other country. Yes with the health care it will be more taxes, but that's what you get for holding a USA passport. If it's that bad, get CR citizenship and renounce your USA one.

 

ECR: The main concern is for those who are not yet covered by Medicare, those who are don't have to worry. But if you are not, then you need to be concerned about how this will affect you.

 

There is an $80,000 exemption on income outside the US, plus it looks like there will be no penalty tax if you live outside the US for 330 days a year.

But again, this still needs legal clarification. I am having a hard time finding a definite answer on how this effects US expats. Will we be exempt, or have to participate in some state plan?

 

Why can't the US provide universal healthcare for its Citizens, like it provides for its Congress critters and other government employees?

Oh, thats right, some corporation would be deprived of profits, and mega-million $ executive bonuses.... :angry:

 

Dana

Edited by DanaJ

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I say congratulations to the U.S. for (belatedly) joining the rest of the industrialized world in providing health care. If this had been done years ago I would still be there.

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Regardless of the health care bill, you have to pay taxes to the USA on any income. For those with foreign income, they get a double whammy- taxes from USA and other country. Yes with the health care it will be more taxes, but that's what you get for holding a USA passport. If it's that bad, get CR citizenship and renounce your USA one.

and wait (paying US taxes all the while) 10 years...

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I figured all legal residents pay the Caja fee so they are covered right? The intend is that you can show proof of insurance which your "fee" (or is it a tax?) provides??.

 

note, , there are no provision or funding to detect or punish those who don't comply so it will be a long time until they figure all this out .... I a person will check a box on their income tax whether they are covered or not ... if not, fill in $xx on line 20 ... my daughter's college has a website you go punch in your health insurance details in which some company verifies and the school removes the health fee from her bill is another way to handle it ... I wonder if the speak Spanish and can call long distance to CR?

 

Also, I would like to mention this law provides for access not affordability. So, with healthcare cost expected to increase 13% this year an into the future, it is likely more people will have access (<26, low income, no pre-existing, etc.) but many will not be able to afford to participate .... and for those who don't have the funds to participate, the government will punish you with taxes that you can not afford either ... going to be interesting ...

Edited by ncdad1

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"...I figured all legal residents pay the Caja fee so they are covered right? The intend is that you can show proof of insurance which your "fee" (or is it a tax?) provides??...."

 

It is not insurance. It is a fee that you pay every month which allows you to have health care at no charge through the Caja. But yes, all "legal residents" pay it.

 

The Caja issues you a "carnet" which is a small paper with your name and other information on it. This is your "entry" into the health care system. I always keep my carnet and a copy of my latest payment with me.

 

There's a big sign in my local Ebais (Caja clinic) that basically says: "No carnet, no service." At this Ebais, you get your carnet on Thursday afternoon. (Every Ebais has its own little "rules" and ways of doing things.) Whether it is your first carnet or a replacement for some reason, just bring your paperwork that you received from your "signing up." This has your Caja number on it, among other things.

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