Jump to content
iamre999

Can't Seem to Make the Jump and move to Costa Rica

Recommended Posts

I've known I've wanted to live in Costa Rica for more than 10 years now. I've gone down looking for a house/business several times now. I just can't seem to make the final decision to do it. We are not retired, so we would still need some kind of income. I have a successful business and I am SO afraid to shut it down in case things don't work out. It would be hard to be an absentee owner. I guess my biggest worry is how family will react. Why can't I just do it? If you felt the same way and made the jump, what was it that allowed you to do it? Change in thinking, ignoring what family says, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Given your situation, I can understand your reluctance to "make the jump."

 

I think you need to take a long look at your reasons for wanting to move here. Is it just to "get away" from your current situation? I think you will have to be ready to make the drastic changes in your life that will be necessary and understand that if it doesn't work out, you will have to make a new life for yourself either "back home" or somewhere else.

 

At one point in my life, I "made the jump" from successful corporate sales person selling computers to painting houses. I went on to live in a coastal town and was a subsistence fisherman while painting houses to pay the rent. I went from something I hated to something I loved - although I was poor. Eventually, I started a wholesale seafood business which was successful.

 

As for "family" - do you have a wife and children or is it just you? That makes a HUGE difference. If it is just you, why are you so worried about what your family thinks? It's your life. Of course, I don't know what your situation or relationship with your family is.

 

When I told people I was moving to Costa Rica, they mostly just laughed at me or else got some dreamy look. I doubt that they really believed it. I had a plan and followed through with it and dismissed anyone who was doubtful ("You mean they don't speak English!??")

 

If you are really set on moving here and you really believe it is the right thing for you, then you need to make it happen. But you have to understand that you are jumping into a new life and will have to make your way in it, whether it is here or somewhere else.

 

Maybe the dream of moving to Costa Rica is just something that sustains you through difficult times and is not something you are actually prepared to do. Nothing wrong with that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Eleanorcr ... "corporate sales to house painter to seafood sales" ... interesting ..maybe you should write a book.

 

imre999 - eleanorcr has some good advice ... my suggestion to break through would be to remove the emotion and do a simple business case ... numbers are sobering ... it might be a simple as miserable but safe vs. destitute but happy ... maybe you just need a more transportable business ....can you and do you want to live on no money with more risk? ... remember you created one successful business so unless that was a fluke you have ability ... it is a matter of priorities and how you want to spend the limited time you have been given on the this earth ... maybe ask if you had a year to live what would you do?. On the issue of what your friends and family think, well I would discount that compared to what makes you happy. Are you sure there is no way to split your time until gradually the decision is made for you ... for example, the more you are gone the more responsibility your employees will take until you really do not need to be involved all the time ... just some thoughts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
... my suggestion to break through would be to remove the emotion and do a simple business case ... numbers are sobering ... it might be a simple as miserable but safe vs. destitute but happy ... remember you created one successful business so unless that was a fluke you have ability

 

Dear iamre,

 

Something to keep in mind is that if you are unaware of how things work in Costa Rica, because they are different than 'back in Kansas', then one has that hurdle to contend with first so until one has a good grasp of those differences you will not want to jump from the frying pan into the fire (or as is sometimes said in spanish, de Guatemala en guatepeor').

 

Who will your client base be in CR? Nationals? Expats? Is there enough demand for your service or product with either (or both groups) to support you?

 

When you start a business will you be satisfied with only managing it and not working in it as residency restrictions dictate?

 

I am sure other Forums members can offer more observations about starting or operating a business in CR.

 

And before you even consider making a leap be sure to do extra due diligence so that you know just where you are leaping to.

 

Best Regards,

 

Paul M.

==

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You need to prove income in order to apply for residency here, and you need to apply for residency in order to stay here. If you own a business that is online only and your work is paid by someone outside of Costa Rica, you can work in it. But that income will not suffice to meet the residency requirements. You must either put up the required funds for rentista or have a lifetime guaranteed income from a pension of some sort. There are other types of residency that I'm not familiar with, so read about them on www.arcr.net or www.therealcostarica.com.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've known I've wanted to live in Costa Rica for more than 10 years now. I've gone down looking for a house/business several times now. I just can't seem to make the final decision to do it. We are not retired, so we would still need some kind of income. I have a successful business and I am SO afraid to shut it down in case things don't work out. It would be hard to be an absentee owner. I guess my biggest worry is how family will react. Why can't I just do it? If you felt the same way and made the jump, what was it that allowed you to do it? Change in thinking, ignoring what family says, etc.

 

My wife and I had discussed this before. How was it that with two grown children, a debt free existence and two stable and well paying jobs, that we executed a plan to sell off all we owned, quit our jobs and resettle in CR?

 

The answer is simple: life sucked! We were working way too hard, living unhealthy lifestyles and there was no end in sight (at age 55). Basically when the pain gets high enough, the decision gets very easy. Do your home work (residency, income, life plan), simplify your life in preparation and the time will come when you can say yes with real certainty.

 

Good luck!

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I neglected to mention that if you have a young family, this then becomes a whole different ball game! Most ex-pats choose private schools which are expensive and it also means that specific areas are preferred as location may limit choices.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I moved because I was ready for an adventure! My life didn't suck, my life was great in the USA. And it's great here, just a little different. I love living in CR but I would have been happy to move to just about any country and start something new. Change is good for the soul! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

iamre999,

 

Not being a planner by nature, I'd suggest doing this a little differently. First, figure out WHY you're reluctant. Is it that you're not a risk-taker and have a comfortable life but think that there's something missing? Is it your gut telling you that either this isn't the right move or not the right time?

 

If you can afford the time away from your business (or can handle it remotely), take a few months off and really spend time in CR in one or two area you've picked out to see what day-to-day life is really like. Go to the local grocery store, stop in at the farmacia and pick up some meds; if there's a local feria, find out when it is and frequent it. Get to know your neighbors, and talk to people. If you can afford to do this, a stint like this may convince you and your partner (you said "we") either that you've saved yourself from jumping off a cliff or that you're ready to begin the next step.

 

In our own case, my spouse wanted to sell our house a year ago and move with our dog and cat onto our 30' sailboat and to CR permanently. I couldn't imagine being "homeless," and wanted to wait. So here we are a year later, having spent about six months on our 30' boat and three months in San Ramon, CR, and I'm ready to make the move. Our house here near Seattle is going on the market probably this weekend, and we'll head to CR in Aug with all our paperwork ready to be submitted to begin the residency process. This decision was right for us, but YMMV. Friends and acquaintances we've talked to have had one of two reactions: *I* could never do that (you must be crazy to leave your friends and family here to go to a foreign country where they don't even speak English) or Oh, I wish I could do that!

 

And whatever you wind up doing, you have my best wishes and hope that you'll post about your decision.

 

regards,

Gayle

 

ps: my spouse and I are both risk-takers, so others may have made a different decision in a similar situation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

even tho my husband and I are both planners, I'm with Gayle - come here for 3 months or so, rent a furnished place, live the culture, learn some spanish (or tiquismos, if you already know spanish), put away your "other life" for a while. see how you feel about it.

We moved (slowly, via multiple trips of several months), and I purposely set aside my "normal" interests just to see what would happen. I gave it roughly 3 years. Turns out I still like my career, missed it some, and so am splitting time again between CR and the states - "retired" and working.

I wouldn't trade those 3-4 years of experimenting with the other life tho, even if I do end up back in the states full time (that scenario is highly unlikely tho).

If you can swing it, give it a nice long time - leave yourself some options, and the risk (and perhaps reluctance) will become vanishingly small.

good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.