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      IMPORTANT - READ BEFORE POSTING to SUPPORT FORUM   01/28/2011

      Posts to this Support Forum are to be related ONLY to one's ARCR membership. Posts inappropriate to the Support Forum will be removed without comment. Please post all other types of questions to the appropriate Forum. Only Forums Moderators, Administrators and ARCR Employees ae able to make any replies to this ARCR Support Forum. Paul M. Forums Moderator ==
diceallion

Young, Healthy, full of dreams

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Epicatt2    0

After the first two years Rentista must renew with another US$60,000 for the next two years.

 

At three (3) years completed the Rentista can then apply for Permanente.

 

Each family member in the Rentista group may apply for Permanente, and likely should apply, because that will give them, each one, their own separate residency status.

 

HTH

 

Paul M.

==

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diceallion    0

I know it has been a while since I last posted, but the dream never dies. Infact this topic is spoken about openly at least once a month. In my mind its about 3 to 4 hours a day...

 

Interestingly enough, tonight at the supper table, my wife opened the discussion, I almost fell off my chair. We spoke mildely about the possible ways we can come up with the 60 grand for 2 years. We figure we can easily re mortgage our home, keep our address here and rent it out, would give us a good taste of what costa rica is and if were really not happy (really meaning the girls), then we can come back. We also spoke about waiting until the children are at least finished elementary school, which would mean 5 more years.

 

Anyway, I can't get this outta my mind, how badly I want to leave this country and go to the tropics. My heart belongs there, and I can't wait to complete my goal.

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Epicatt2    0

Well for one you could come and stay for three months at a time (or up to six months with one required border run) and give Costa Rica a decent 'test-drive'. You can do that as a tourist. Then you could do it again the next year for three or six months.

 

Doing that will give you an excellent feel for what living in CR is like as opposed to vacationing there. It will let you discover where you'd want to live (or not live) and whether you like the culture well enough to want to live there long-term. And you'll be able to explore various places more at leisure, rather than rushing here and there to try to cram in as much as one can on a short vacation.

 

So run this idea past your wife and see if it resonates at all. And BTW, coming down during the summer months while your kids are on school vacation would minimize the impact on their education.

 

Hope this helps...

 

Cheers!

 

Paul M.

==

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ReevesTribe    0

I would recommend the opposite of what you're thinking as far as the ages of your children - from personal experience, you stand a much better chance of their happiness, their integration, if you do it while they are younger. I cannot tell you how many new expats I've met who are chomping at the bit to meet up with other expats with kids the ages of theirs (& now that mine are in the preteen to teen ages, I'm targeted a lot!). I hear the same story a lot - our kid is miserable, they cannot make friends, they don't speak Spanish & won't try, they won't initiate friendships, etc. My older son was just shy of his 10th birthday when we moved & he has struggled to make friends. He gets stared at a lot by other teen boys when out & about - at 6'2", he towers over them, & with dark blonde hair/blue eyes, he definitely doesn't blend physically. Of course, the Ticas love him (& that is another issue altogether, haha). My younger kids are now 12, 12 & 10. They stand out just as much physically, but having been raised in CR from the ages of 6, 6 & 4, they have no self-consciousness & therefore have no problem making friends when we're at a playground or park.

 

It is very easy to think of a perfect plan when your kids are very young & malleable. I promise they won't be so malleable during the middle school/high school years. My kids LOVE Costa Rica, but it is something that has been ingrained in them from a very young age. If you really cannot move earlier than 5 years down the road, you need to spend school breaks in CR, get a Spanish language program for them, & make them excited about Costa Rica.

 

Anyways, good luck with your decisions!

Jessica

Edited by ReevesTribe

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diceallion and what was the temperature and was it still snowing, when your wife 'brought up this subject"? :P

I second what Jessica has posted above, if you can afford to do so... but be prepared for your 'time line' to change for an extra year, as it could take that long to get the necessary paperwork achieved and you would have to be prepared to exit CR for short periods to both update your tourist visas and driving license.

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stewart.tb    0

I third Jessica's comment without a doubt. I lived in Germany/Hungary for a total of 12 years when my kids were young, and they all adapted fine, even becoming fluent in Hungarian and attending school there, and that language is extremely difficult, Spanish is a cakewalk in comparison. (In Hungary, we were one of only two families that did not homeschool, folks were afraid of the language difficulties for their kids. Hungarian is ranked with Mandarin as far as difficulty, and is so different structurally that it and Finnish are alone in their own language branch ... I lived there for six years and although my kids were fluent, I never made it past about a preschool level, jaja. Worse, I was the most "fluent" expat adult there!)

 

It was such a benefit for my kids to live and be immersed in other cultures/languages, I still the see the differences today as compared to their peers. If you're going to make the move, I heartily jump on Jessica's bandwagon, with bells on, and recommend doing so while they're young if you can. They'll take it in stride, language acquisition will be much, much easier, and it will be a great adventure. When they're older ... they're more resistant to change, leaving friends, less likely to lean on parents for support and help ... my kids actually had a difficult time adjusting to life/school back in the US, as we were in a situation where we had to return when the 2 eldest were in 8th and 10th grades. It was really rough on my eldest, being put into US high school after being in German/Hungarian schools, even with that being her "native culture" ... although it didn't feel that way to her.

 

Just my experience, but I've known lots and lots of folks in the same position, and hands down, those who've had the best adjustments were those who did the move with younger kids. Good luck!

Edited by stewart.tb

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diceallion    0

I respect and listen cautiously to everyones comments. Believe me if it were possible to do this earlier, I would, how ever financially it is not possible. I know it would be easier for my children at a younger age as well, i have been talking to them about this topic for about a year now. My oldest is 9 and she loves the idea, on her spare time she takes spanish lessons on the computer using Rosetta Stone. My youngest at 5, well let me tell you, she is careless, lol, she has a free spirit like her daddy, goes with the flow. I don't plan on doing anything with out a plan, i read a lot on the forum, I know when the time comes, it still wont be perfect, even with all the preparation. There will always be the "Why didn't i think of that" moment... Hence the reason we will keep our house here, JUST IN CASE we are not happy.

 

For those of you that might be asking why I want to move, besides from my previous comments in the thread... Let me ask this question. Am I wrong in thinking that I will have a better quality of life, spend more time with my family, appreciate more of the smaller things, and learn to live without being so materialistic. Isn't there more to life then just dedicating all your time to a career in a fast paced world where we live to work and pay bills when the weekend comes your too exhausted to do anything. Im not saying that I never have to work again, I realize that if I ever become permanent resident, I will have to work. Im only 33 and I have many years of working ahead of me. There is so much more to say... Im taking a typing break.

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ReevesTribe    0

I don't think it is a matter of right or wrong. I guess my question is why must you move to a new country to make the kind of changes you are talking about? Why can't you start now? Do you have to actually move to Costa Rica to have a better quality of life, spend more time with your family, appreciate more of the smaller things, & learn to be less materialistic? No! Sure, you might accomplish those things while in CR out of necessity - I mean, you won't be able to work & I assume will be on a tight budget based on your comments. But, there isn't anything in CR that will magically make it so - what will make those changes are really within you, & because of that I don't believe there is any reason you cannot achieve that right where you are, right now.

 

Just my personal opinion!

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To come here and be 'financially strapped' would put you and your family in a bad position

Take your time ... Costa Rica will still be here when the time is right, for you to take this step.

In the meantime, practice what you preach " .... spend more time with my family, appreciate more of the smaller things, and learn to live without being so materialistic" as it can done, anywhere in the world.

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eleanorcr    0

Yes, do more of that good stuff where you are now! In addition, you could work on cutting back on your lifestyle and saving more money. Maybe you already live a very simple and frugal life but just a reminder. If you believe that there is a better life for you here (or somewhere similar), then every Starbucks coffee (or whatever) you don't buy is one step closer.

 

Having to work long and stressful hours really takes a toll on you. (I used to sell large computer systems.) But see if you can figure out a way to minimize that. When I was working a high-stress job, I made sure my boss knew that I was going to take a few hours off to go to my son's Little League games or my daughter's play at school. (I was a single mom.) Yes, I had to work at home some nights, after they went to bed, but they never felt "deprived." I am sure if you put your mind to it, you can work something out.

 

At that time, I lived about 25 miles from where I worked and at first, I hated that drive back and forth. But then I used it as "transition time" from home to job and vice versa. By the time I got home, work was gone and dinner and kids were first. I "trained" myself not to think/worry about work. (Until one of those dreaded phone calls came, of course........) Most of it is in your mind. If you can learn some techniques for removing the stress from your life now, it will help. And I mean changing yourself and not your situation. Things don't stress you out.... you LET them stress you out - that kind of thing.

 

I think that one of the reasons my move to Costa Rica was successful is that I live pretty much the same life I had in the US. I lived in a tiny house without a lot of "amenities," (It was about 600 square feet and I built most of it with my own hands and used a lot of recycled materials.) I didn't buy a lot of "stuff" (except for tools - I'm a sucker for tools) and lived pretty close to the bone. For the last 25 years or so before I moved to Costa Rica, I was more or less poor, so living a "frugal life" here doesn't bother me at all.

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diceallion    0

because the society makes it the way it is, yes I represent mainly the way the things are and yes I can make the changes here, yes it can be done anywhere in the world, but Im not surrounded by the nature, the wild life, the common life the fresh vegetables, the walks to the farmers market, its all superficial to me here. In other words, it"s in my blood to be in the tropics... I have been visioning this since I was a little child, I was always asking my mother to leave Canada. I want the warm climate, I hate winters, I love the ocean, I hate swimming pools, I LOVE palm trees, I hate maple trees, I love spanish people (i am not spanish) I have NO tolerance for French people here and there language issues of putting english people down... I want the great outdoors, not the city...

 

Look most of you already know this... You all lived in Canada or the USA, sure I can downgrade my life style here, then what... Sell my house live in a apartment, get a less stressful job make less money and then what be moire miserable here, lol Look my arguments are not well thought out right now while I am typing, I do not disagree with you guys at all, and I am not trying to prove anyone wrong, you all have more experience then I do and most of you are older then me.

 

You all made the change, do you remember the feeling you had inside you when you knew you belonged somewhere else... Thats how I feel, This place is not my home, is C.R. my home... Who knows right? I just want to raise my family in a different culture then this one.

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eleanorcr    0

diceallion: We feel your pain!

 

I think we are all struggling trying to help you in some way. At least, you have some folks who understand what you are going through and maybe that helps.

 

I will say this: If you are confident that living in the tropics or living in Costa Rica is what you want to do..... then just do it. Make it happen. Be ready to handle everything with your hands, your heart, your brain. Of course, your family must be happy with that decision, too. If all of you are "up" for the adventure, you can make it happen successfully.

 

All we ask is that you are realistic about what life is like here. I think you probably are. For most of us, it is Paradise - but not without flaws, as you have seen from the discussions here. If you are willing (and not just because you are desperate to leave) to put up with the flaws, then just go for it.

 

Even though I came here only twice before moving here, I always counsel other people to do more investigating. For me, it was an easy decision. I knew I was "home." All the time I was here, I kept thinking, "home." It fit me like a glove.

 

Lack of paved streets? Yeeha!

Bureaucracy? Take a book or crossword puzzle.

Not able to find stuff in the supermarket that I'm used to? So what. I adjust.

Health care? I never worried about it in my past life and don't worry about it now.

 

I've never looked back and I would never consider voluntarily moving back to the US.

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stewart.tb    0

I hear you, diceallion, and of course, you have to do things when and how you can, according to your family's situation. If you CAN move when the kids are young, fantastic, but if your situation won't allow that, you do what you can now from where you are to prepare them for that, and it sounds like that's exactly what you are doing. If this is a family goal that you are all planning for and working toward, with actual concrete steps made toward it becoming a reality (Spanish classes, for example), that's a whole different thing than just one day popping out with, "Hey kids, we're moving to Costa Rica!" I do think that seriously learning Spanish is far and away the most important step, take advantage of the time to do it now, that will really help with the kids' adjustment and with them feeling prepared and stoked rather than unsure or even nervous.

 

Yes, it is, for some reason, harder to make those changes from the US when you are already in place, habits and schedules are already set and operating. A move is a surefire way to force change in many different areas. But for many of us (definitely including me) budget dictates what can be done and when. Some others have made some good suggestions of things you can do now, in addition to the Spanish to get started. It will make you feel like you have more control and that you're actively working toward your goal. I wish you and your family the best of luck.

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I can only hope that when you do get here, this country can fulfill your dreams and expectations but only time will tell.

BTW there are many French speaking people here ... and why Montreal is where you can find the cheap airfares to Costa Rica! :D

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