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SydB

I know that some gringos marry Ticas in order to obtain citizenship, b

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No, SydB, what you write is less than totally comprehensible, so why don't you just spit it out?

 

Ok, Mr. Murray, since you insist, I'll bite, and if I am not allowed to post again on this forum, so be it.

 

First, I want you to look up Costa Rica on the CIA's World Factbook website: https://www.cia.gov/...ok/geos/cs.html

 

I want you to find the "Ethnic groups" section and confirm that it says the following:

white (including mestizo) 94%, black 3%, Amerindian 1%, Chinese 1%, other 1%

 

Now answer the following question: doesn't the fact that Costa Rica report its population as being 94% white catch your attention? Sure, they mention that mestizos are part of that 94%, but they don't tell you what percentage is white and what percentage mestizo. They blur the lines between white and mestizo not only because they want to attract American/European investment and tourism, but also because they either consider themselves white or want to be white. You could argue that the average Costa Rican is whiter than the average Nicaraguan, but in your experience living in Costa Rica, does the average Costa Rican look "white" to you?

 

Second, in Latin American countries the upper classes are usually made up of people with direct European ancestry. Being white is desirable and considered a sign of social status, and it's not uncommon for light skinned mestizos to deny or sulk over their indigenous ancestry. If a Costa Rican woman marries a white gringo, and has children with him, the children might look white, which might or might not be what the woman was after. It's like the women who go to sperm banks and pay thousands of dollars to be inseminated with the semen of doctors and athletes. They want children with desirable traits.

 

I hope that answers your question.

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As most of us know, if a gringo is desperate to obtain Costa Rican citizenship, he can always marry a Tica, which isn't very hard to do, since gringos, especially the more ethnic looking ones, have high social status in that country and are for the most part considered desirable, either because the ladies think that all gringos are rich, because they want American citizenship, or because they want to whiten up a little bit. I was wondering if the same is true for gringas living in Costa Rica who want to obtain Costa Rican citizenship. Do they marry Ticos in order to obtain papers or is that unheard of?

 

I've been catching up on New Content here on the forum and all of your posts seem to be lame attempts at instigating some sort of drama. I don't know, maybe you got sick of all the petty arguments and negative comments on here and are trying to have fun with it? Well, it is not working, and is only serving to turn more people away than draw them in. You need to be smarter about it. You can learn a lot from 27b/6. His website is funny, intelligent, and widely creative: http://www.27bslash6.com/index.html

 

peace.

Edited by pupstar

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...in Latin American countries the upper classes are usually made up of people with direct European ancestry. Being white is desirable and considered a sign of social status, and it's not uncommon for light skinned mestizos to deny or sulk over their indigenous ancestry.

I hope that answers your question.

Syd,

 

One of the reasons that Costa Rica has so little indigenous population is that there never was a large indigenous population in the region, even before it came to be colonized by the Spanish.

 

Maybe you would do well to read up on the history of Costa Rica and how it was colonized. This is covered quite directly in a book called "The Ticos: Culture and Social Change in Costa Rica" by Mavis, Richard & Karen Biesanz. The Ticos themselves have never been overly pleased with this book because it tells Costa Rica's history 'like it is'.

 

Reading this book may substantially change your perspective on this topic, Syd. I would recommend doing that.

 

Paul M.

==

 

REMINDER: Some of the responses here have continued right close to the edge of civility. Let us please keep it from going over that edge.

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Although the comment may be offensive to some, there may be some truth to it as well. The "whiten up a bit" comment was not neccessary though.

 

Look in the US. This happens all the time. Foreigners marry to gain residency in the US.

 

Who am I to judge someone else to why they are getting married? That's none of my business.

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Syd,

 

One of the reasons that Costa Rica has so little indigenous population is that there never was a large indigenous population in the region, even before it came to be colonized by the Spanish.

 

Maybe you would do well to read up on the history of Costa Rica and how it was colonized. This is covered quite directly in a book called "The Ticos: Culture and Social Change in Costa Rica" by Mavis, Richard & Karen Biesanz. The Ticos themselves have never been overly pleased with this book because it tells Costa Rica's history 'like it is'.

 

Reading this book may substantially change your perspective on this topic, Syd. I would recommend doing that

 

That book seems like my cup of tea. I found it on Google Books which means I'll read it (or most of it) for free. Page 6 of "The Ticos: culture and social change in Costa Rica" says:

 

"When we refer to "Ticos" or "most Ticos," we generally have in mind the politically and culturally dominant mestizo (in Ticos' own eyes, white) majority. Ticos of all classes, political parties, and regions share a sense of national identity. They believe they have a unique way of life and a distinctive national character. They may explain an action by saying, "We Latinos are like that" but are far likelier to say, "We Ticos are like that." They feel set apart from (and superior to) their Central American neighbors not only because of the lighter skin of the average Costa Rican but also because of cultural differences."

 

Page 13:

 

"Archaeological studies as well as recent research into the 500 years of the European presence have led contemporary historians to revise this leyenda blanca, or "white legend," as Theodor Creedman calls it. They assert that it downgrades indigenous people, ignores their cruel treatment by the colonists, and exaggerates the whiteness of Costa Ricans.

 

"Some 400,000 to 500,000 people, according to recent research, were probably living in the area that is now Costa Rica when Columbus landed in 1502. This research overtured the long-held belief that the indigenous population was tiny."

 

 

That's not contradictory to anything I've written on this forum. It not only supports my argument that Ticos value light skin but also contradicts your claim that there never was a large indigenous population in the region.

Edited by SydB

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"[Ticos] feel set apart from (and superior to) their Central American neighbors not only because of the lighter skin of the average Costa Rican but also because of cultural differences."

 

That's not contradictory to anything I've written on this forum. It only supports my argument that Ticos value light skin and deny their native american heritage.

Nor is that attitude anything that is endemic to Costa Rica. Indeed, it occurs in the rest of Central and South America (and the US, for that matter), so I am beginning to wonder why you brought it up in the first place.

 

I have traveled in CAmer for more than three decades and have seen these (usually very subtle) discriminations play out wherever I have been. To me this is not necessarily right, but it do strike me as far less virulent than what we have been witness to in the US!

 

If nothing else, it should be a lesson for how 'not' to be, speaking for ourselves.

 

Regards,

 

Paul M.

==

 

"nobody is absolutely worthless; they can always serve as a bad example!"

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