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http://www.tricare.mil/mybenefit/ProfileFilter.do?puri=%2Fhome%2FPrescriptions%2FFillingPrescriptions%2FTMOP

 

 

 

I copied the below off the above Tricare web site. Unfortunately if you are retired military an APO/FPO is no longer an option at the U.S. Embassy. I think your next best option is to use something like Aerocasillas; try using their “prealert” option to inform Costa Rican customs that the package is your prescription medicines and maybe that would help it speed through customs (just a guess).

 

 

“Prescriptions may be mailed to any address in the United States and its territories, including temporary and APO/FPO addresses. If you are assigned to an embassy and do not have an APO/FPO address, you must use the embassy address. Prescriptions cannot be mailed to private foreign addresses. Refrigerated medications cannot be shipped to APO/FPO addresses.”

 

 

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By having a private mail service such as Aerocasillas, you get a Miami address that you can use. Aerocasillas is just one of the services available - I use TransExpress/Sociaco. When I order something that is going to be shipped to me, I just forward by email a copy of the order or confirmation to my mail service so that know to expect it. By the way, I am not talking TriCare specifically, but just in general.

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Can you use the mail in pharmacy for meds while living in costa rica? Anyone know about this?

The problem with TRICARE prescriptions is that they must be written by a Dr. licensed in the USA. Difficult to find here, however if enough persons were to approach Clinica Biblica about this, maybe (maybe) something could be worked out. They have an office in Florida (ASEMECO). I've asked about this at Clinica Biblica. If enouogh persons were to talk to the Office of International Insurance at Clinica Biblica, maybe something could be worked out?? My sole voice from the "wilderness" sure isn't going to do it!! Respectfully

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thanx for all the response. My other question is,does anyone use the national health system and how is it? Can you get an app fairly quickly? Can you get most meds at the pharmacy with or without a perscription,such as migrane pills,prempro(female hormones),cholesterol etc.

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There has been much discussion regarding CAJA so please search for previous posts. Most of us on this forum seems to use both CAJA and private doctors.

Many medications may be purchased 'over the counter' but while cheaper than the US they are not free unless prescribed by a doctor affiliated with CAJA. The meds supplied are generally genetic so many pay for their preferred medications.

You must join a line to see a make an appointment later that day, very early in the AM, then return for the appointment. You cannot choose which doctor nor clinic but the one in your specific area.

Personally, I think CAJA is great for an emergency, but prefer to use the private facilities.

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okay,so they say for a small fee based on what you make for the national health system. Do you know about how much per say? So is the private health real expensive? Trying to get some questions answered before we acually commit to moving there. Theres so much more involved than we thought,but learning alot from great people. I'm so gratefull for all the info guys.

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SueC if you join CAJA, which you now must do, it will cost for a couple approx. $45 per month if you are over 55, plus the fees you will pay to ARCR each year. But this will be likely still less than joining CAJA as an individual, where your pension, annuity or resident status already is known.

For instance last week my husband had an appointment with a cardiologist in Liberia. Cost per visit $70. We both had all sorts of blood tests for a cost of $250 which seems a lot for CR but there were a variety of tests. Hubby has both high cholesterol and high blood pressure and none of the generic meds. supplied by CAJA work for him. I have osteoporosis and what I 'need' is not supplied either...

While some of the tests would have been covered by CAJA, most weren't. And then we would have to wait a week or so for the results, whereas going 'private', we received most of them, two hours later.

As I mentioned to you in an earlier post, you should visit first before you pay out for lawyer fees and then decide that Costa Rica isn't for you.

It is purported that 50% of people that move here, return to the home after a year or so for many reasons and I knew many personally those who have done so.

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okay,so they say for a small fee based on what you make for the national health system. Do you know about how much per say? So is the private health real expensive? Trying to get some questions answered before we acually commit to moving there. Theres so much more involved than we thought,but learning alot from great people. I'm so gratefull for all the info guys.

To add to what CRF said... If you become a 'self-pay' with the CAJA, your 'premium' is 13% of your income vs the $45 you would play to CAJA thru ARCR as a member there. So you can figure out which is the cost saver.

 

My SSA check is around $1250 per month which at 13% would be a $162.50 to CAJA based upon my SSA. Now I'm also told ithat if you apply directly to CAJA they will adjust your income based upon your monthly expenses, although I am unsure which expenses they would consider would to apply against your SSA income.

 

Even if CAJA adjusted off $400 in expenses, I'd still be paying $110.50 on my remaining inocme of $850.

 

Maybe one of our other Forums members has first-hand knowledge of how CAJA applies deduction and for what and can add some further insight to this thread.

 

Regards,

 

Paul M.

==

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Well lets see,I am 52 hubby is 59 so hows that work? So what are you paying arcr for? I too have osteo and take bone med for that, among other meds. Hubby doesnt at the moment,so its me were concerned about. Is the private insurance alot higher verses the CAJA(what does that acually stand for)?

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You would pay ARCR's membership fee of $50/yr ($100/yr if not a resident). This would entitle you to many services and advice, as well as getting to join in on the negotiated Caja rate. Since your husband is older, use him as the primary - then you would get the $45/month rate for your family.

Once you are "in" the caja system, when you visit a caja facility (EBAIS or hospital), there is no cost to you. Private health care varies a lot in cost. We paid $12 for one Dr. visit (just dropped in on a neighbor's recommendation). However, most visits have run about $70.

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sueC have you read the information on the The Real Costa Rica website?

The CAJA through ARCR rate would be based on your husbands age. You would be using this to belong to a group of 'ex-pats' who get a better rate than an individual. They host this forum, and they offer many services, such as helping you procure a reliable lawyer to apply for residency.

CAJA actually is Caja Costarricense de Seguro Social or CCSS. "This is the government medical plan that most Costa Ricans have. It is socialized medicine, so be prepared! It works very well for low-middle income groups, and you will get decent medical care, but lines are long, medicines are generic and may not work well, and as with all socialized medicine, you can wait years for some forms of surgery" which is copied from the The Real Costa Rica "Insurance" page. INS is a private insurance with more detailed information on the linked site

Regarding osteoporosis, some generic medication is available, but my doctor didn't feel it was in my best interest to take what was supplied at no cost. You will have to pay a higher price for supplements and you will have a very limited choice.

I think you need to read and digest what Costa Rica is all about and whether or not it will meet your needs.

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... the CAJA (what does that acually stand for)?

Hi Sue,

 

CAJA is short for part of CCSS, which is Caja Costarrisence de Seguro Social.

 

A close approximation of the meaning of CAJA itself would be box or drawer (like cash drawer), so by extension, fund, as close as I can figure.

 

Therefore the CCSS is the Costarrican Fund for Social Security, or a near sense to that.

 

HTH

 

Paul M.

==

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