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Pat Mcgroin

Coast Guard dispatching ships and personnel to Costa Rica to threaten

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I highly doubt that "US companies account for more than half the economy" in Costa Rica.

 

 

Some facts to support my point that the US financial investment and importance in CR is far too great for the US AND CR to ignore/abandon/leave unprotected, etc., during a possible military conflict between CR and ANY other country in the world. And the data provided doesn't mention the significant impact on the CR tourism and real estate industries by US companies and citizens.

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Well, I could spend the rest of the day refuting almost everything you say, but I don't have the time, energy or inclination to do so. Have fun ........

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Well, I could spend the rest of the day refuting almost everything you say,

 

...Considering how emotionally anti-US you appear to be in your postings throughout this forum, I'm not at all surprised you'd say that.

 

As others have suggested previously, discussing something based on emotions instead of facts and data is usually pointless unless all of the people in the discussion already share the same emotions, and at that point the facts are of little importance.

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Interesting trivia and me playing again, the devil's advocate...

 

Sport fishing alone by North American gringos in 2008 accounted for 2% of Costa Rica's gross domestic product. Think about that for a second. That's one activty of many that North American (US and Canadian) gringo's come here for. So the old story that CR doesn't need gringos or that we don't contribute much doesn't hold water. No pun intended.

 

In the year 2008:

 


  •  
  • Sport fishing by North American visitors generated $599 million or about 2% of Costa Rica’s gross domestic product
     
  • Of that $599 million sport fishing generated almost $78 million in tax revenues for Costa Rica and 63,000 jobs
     
  • $329 million of the above was spent on travel including lodging ($119 million), restaurants ($15.6 million), flights and fishing guides ($88 million) and land transportation ($6 million).
     
  • Additionally and not included in the above figures, 3,700 of the visitors have their own boats in Costa Rica and spent approximately $138 million for items such as fuel ($45.6 million), maintenance and repairs ($25 million), furniture and accessories for their vessels ($48 million), staff and crews ($2.8 million), marina fees ($16.6 million), and taxes and insurance ($1.8 million).

 

I wonder what else gringos do while they're here besides fish as the above only accounts for 22% of visitors? I can think of a bunch of items...

 

I wonder how much was collected last year for the luxury tax?

 

I wonder how much of the luxury tax collected was from Tico's vs expats?

 

I wonder how much Intel brings in to the CR economy?

 

 

BTW - Above figures from a study performed by The Billfish Foundation, Southwick Associates and the University of Costa Rica in 2009

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Eat sh*t. No, I was NOT a draft dodger and I dare you insinuate that because you were cannon fodder you know the truth. Give me a break, so you're my hero because you were a grunt in a war machine? And tell me, how much of my tax dollars are you collecting to lord over me with your superior insights? Give a fact or shut up.

Well you sure are opinionated, and I did stat facts. But It seems that I did not read any facts in all of your posts. Besides If you are such a great American why don t you move back and then you would not have to worry about what the US Military may do here. And yes you could say I am an expert on Military after 26 years served.

Ron USCG Ret

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Say, isn't Nicaragua having elections? Then this is nothing new, just the same old US gunboat diplomacy: Vote the way we want you to, or we'll be forced to bring Democracy to your country and shove it down your throat at gunpoint.

Yep, nothing new, nothing changes. Meet the new boss, same as the old boss....

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No worries, someday it will come to an end and China will be the big guy on the block bringing gunboat communism to the world. Then, we'll all sit around reminiscing about the good old days when the 'big bad US' was in charge...

 

You know, the 'big bad US' who

...provides more aid to the world than anyone else.

...provides more disaster relief to the world than anyone else.

...stands up and fights more than anyone else.

 

The same country everyone hates but turns to in time of need.

 

Blah blah blah... :o

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The same country everyone hates but turns to in time of need.

 

Blah blah blah... :o

 

In the way that GWB was terrible for the world, and his approval rating among Americans was less than 30%, most Americans would not want other countries (and their people) to think that GWB accurately represented Americans' feelings in general about many things of importance to the rest of the world. But with GWB around, it was easy for the rest of the world to hate the US, even though GWB was not an accurate descriptor of what most Americans want and believe.

 

When people are struggling, they need an enemy, and the guys in charge of those struggling people know this. This is why idiots like Chavez and Castro complain about the US and blame all of their countries problems on something related to the US, while accepting millions of dollars of much-needed aide and money. These guys portray themselves as the protectors of the citizenry against the big, bad USA, you know, like GWB did when he claimed he was protecting Americans from the terrorists, while his cronies were making billions of dollars off of his international activities.

 

And when struggling people are united against an enemy they seem to forget all that the "enemy" is actually doing for them, but their leaders fully understand that they need the enemy to help them. So there is a beautiful balance, guys like Chavez and Castro make themselves look better and remain in power, and their bank accounts continue to grow by the millions, in substantial part due to monies coming in from the US.

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You left out “open and transparent” Obama and his cronies. In the manmade natural disaster in the Gulf he turned away help from other nations, shut down drilling (because they’re too deep?) while his cronies (Soros and company) will now make billions on deeper wells in Brazil.

 

 

And how about that latest bill he just signed for financial reform (to protect the American people?) Now open and transparent Obama has made the SEC a secret society. We, the American people can no longer obtain SEC info on bailouts etc. via FOIA. They are exempt!!!!

 

 

Those are just the latest two; all in the name of protecting the American people.

 

 

I think dialogs the world over love a good crisis and low level chaos. It allows them to ram through their world view to “fix” the problem.

 

 

 

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Let me just weigh in here with one thing: (I feel like I am jumping in between two high school boys fighting in the hall)

 

When I lived in Florida, there was always a big influx of snowbirds or people who actually moved to the place where I lived. One local lady said to me one time, "I don't get it. People move here because they love it and it is beautiful and the first thing they want to do is change it so it is just like where they came from!"

 

The second thing that happened...... so many of these snowbirds or "immigrants" would come to town and then start with "What you OUGHTTA do is ...." It became a standing joke. They all knew so much better than anyone else what us poor ignorant white trash Southerners should be doing about anything and everything. Then, someone found this great bumper sticker:

 

We Don't Care How You Did It Up North or should it be WE DON'T CARE HOW YOU DID IT UP NORTH

 

Maybe we need something like this for Costa Rica.....

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I think dialogs the world over love a good crisis and low level chaos. It allows them to ram through their world view to “fix” the problem.

 

Verdad. And for those without the ability or will to do something constructive, an opportunity to complain.

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Say, isn't Nicaragua having elections? Then this is nothing new, just the same old US gunboat diplomacy: Vote the way we want you to, or we'll be forced to bring Democracy to your country and shove it down your throat at gunpoint.

Yep, nothing new, nothing changes. Meet the new boss, same as the old boss....

 

 

So your point is that we should reject anything tangentially associated with the U.S. military because … well, because it’s the U.S. military. If you chose to stand on principal that’s fine as long as you are willing to accept for yourself and others (Costa Ricans in this case) the consequences of your decision.

 

 

And what if you are wrong? then what? What if Costa Rica were to go the way of the northern states in Central America in regards to the influence and violence of the Mexican drug cartels?

 

 

I hear your argument all the time.

 

 

Do you think that Costa Rica would enjoy the fruits of no military if not for the military of the United States? The fact that Costa Rica has voted to partnership with the U.S. and its military and law enforcement efforts on many occasions is evidence that the country sees the wisdom and advantage in dealing with what some refer to as the “Evil Yankee Empire”.

 

 

Do you then reject all militaries? Do you then reject all assistance and law enforcement partnership efforts, from any country with a military? Or are you selectively accepting of cold cash from a country that spends some of its revenues on maintaining and training a standing military. Are you willing to trade with the Evil Empire?

 

 

Here’s an article from the 26th of July regarding the growing narcotic trafficking problem in Central America.

 

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/07/26/AR2010072605661_pf.html

 

 

Mexican drug cartels bring violence with them in move to Central America

 

By Nick Miroff and William Booth

Washington Post staff writers

Tuesday, July 27, 2010; A01

 

“… The Mexican cartels "are spreading their horizons to states where they feel, quite frankly, more comfortable. These governments in Central America face a very real challenge in confronting these organizations," said David Gaddis, chief of operations for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. …”

 

 

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There is the old saying, "Pick the low-hanging fruit". It means, go after the relatively easy money that is available. Some newspaper article asked the mayor of Belen how it was that the municipality was able to accomplish so much recently. He replied, 'Collect the taxes and don't misappropriate it-don't steal it for yourself. There is money in the streets, just go get it.'

 

It seems to me that CR complains about not having enough money for police... Well how about writing some tickets for reckless driving once in a while and collecting the traffic and parking fines?!

 

CR complains about not having money for fighting drug smugglers, so they tell the US to pay for it... Really, what happens to those millions of dollars the CR police confiscate each year? Would it be a crazy idea to reinvest that money for tools to get still more confiscations of cash? What if CR's drug enforcement was privatized and the government got only a share of the confiscations? There would be real results, rapidly.

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...

What if CR's drug enforcement was privatized and the government got only a share of the confiscations? There would be real results, rapidly.

...

 

Along those lines of privatization what do you think about the old argument as a practical and pragmatic approach to regulate rather than outlaw much of the drug trade? As we now do with the production, distribution, sale and consumption of alcohol. You can drink if over 18 but can't drive. You can produce and sell it if you have a license. It would still require a heavy law enforcement effort in the short term until the cartels were destroyed or morphed to conform to standard civilized business practices of a legal profit motive; no assassinations etc.

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Along those lines of privatization what do you think about the old argument as a practical and pragmatic approach to regulate rather than outlaw much of the drug trade? As we now do with the production, distribution, sale and consumption of alcohol. You can drink if over 18 but can't drive. You can produce and sell it if you have a license. It would still require a heavy law enforcement effort in the short term until the cartels were destroyed or morphed to conform to standard civilized business practices of a legal profit motive; no assassinations etc.

 

So, the end result is allowing more drugs throughout the society... My short answer is that I am against regulating instead of outlawing, primarily because more drugs will result in more negative impacts for innocent victims of those who "overindulge", beyond harmless recreational use.

 

The arguments always end up being mostly emotional rather than practical and rational... Alcohol abuse causes many problems. Which is worse and why...? Smoking pot or drinking alcohol? For the most part the effects are largely the same, but the smokers don't have the same influence over the relevant laws that the drinkers do, and the drinkers got their approvals first.

 

I live in the (south) Bay Area of NorCal where this debate is ongoing and the pot smokers are getting more and more freedom. My emotional and somewhat rational point of view is that loosening regulations on pot creates more problems for the society, but the "fact" is that alcohol abuse is not a better thing than pot abuse, so why ban one and not the other?

 

Can we talk about the much-needed solutions for La Sele instead? Coach's fault or players fault? :)

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