Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Sal

Pre-fab or simple cabin builders?

Recommended Posts

Kees&Ellen while you describe what is being built next door, doesn't mean that the houses you have observed with 'cracks' were built the same way...

Ours was built by the same builder and it has cracks and it is only 2 to 3 years old.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would be interested in seeing one of these houses that "floats" and doesn't have cracks from earthquakes. Can you point me to the location of one of these? Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would be interested in seeing one of these houses that "floats" and doesn't have cracks from earthquakes. Can you point me to the location of one of these? Thanks.

Hi Eleanor

I gave website on my original forum message this afternoon

Hope this helps

Ellen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ellen: This is what you posted

 

We are currently working with Ion Zaharescu

Zircotech Corporation

506 8884 3688

email zircotech@gmx.net

He uses a process called www.greeninnovations.com

He also uses products called NUDURA,INSUL..DECK.

www.claudioforest.it to name a few.

 

This doesn't look like it would have any specific information about a house that has been built using this technique in Costa Rica. Perhaps the best thing to do would be to email Zircotech. The two websites look like they describe the process and the products. Thanks for the info.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would be interested in seeing one of these houses that "floats" and doesn't have cracks from earthquakes. Can you point me to the location of one of these? Thanks.

 

A house built on a floating foundation is generally built that way not because it won't be damaged in an earthquake but because the subsoil on which it rests is not sufficiently strong to support a typical structure. If the engineering is done correctly, there's nothing wrong with a floating foundation, but it's not a cure-all for earthquake damage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ellen: This is what you posted

 

We are currently working with Ion Zaharescu

Zircotech Corporation

506 8884 3688

email zircotech@gmx.net

He uses a process called www.greeninnovations.com

He also uses products called NUDURA,INSUL..DECK.

www.claudioforest.it to name a few.

 

This doesn't look like it would have any specific information about a house that has been built using this technique in Costa Rica. Perhaps the best thing to do would be to email Zircotech. The two websites look like they describe the process and the products. Thanks for the info.

There is a project, Las Palmas.(on their website)

I am sure Ion will be more than happy to answer your enquiries.

Hope this helps

Ellen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A house built on a floating foundation is generally built that way not because it won't be damaged in an earthquake but because the subsoil on which it rests is not sufficiently strong to support a typical structure. If the engineering is done correctly, there's nothing wrong with a floating foundation, but it's not a cure-all for earthquake damage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I mentioned that we were familiar with this system as it was available in Canada.

I lived all my life until 6 months ago in the Toronto area and never felt an earthquake until I arrived in CR.

It is, most certainly, not about the subsoil in Canada or about earthquake proof.

It is however, about an alternate building system availble in CR.

the system seems to be efficient and moves to completion, in our case, 2 months. This time frame, mostly due to weather at this time of year.

We are planning to use this system in Grecia.

This system was suggested without having decided on a property.

I sent this information to Sal in reply to his thread on building systems available. Never, as a system he should use.

I suggest each of us do our own due diligence.

It is a huge decision and not to be taken lightly.

Hope this helps

Ellen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ellen - the building process you describe (men mixing cement or concrete by hand and then jabbing it into the hole of concrete blocks with rebar, etc) is typical of many Costa Rican builders. And there's nothing wrong with it. I think we all have to distinguish between what is "wrong" and what is "different." When I was doing some building, I thought it was "wrong" when the laborers didn't fill any remaining gaps between the concrete blocks. However, they did other things that weren't wrong, just different and new to me.

 

We live in a different country where traditions are different, available supplies are different and many times, something is done a certain way for a reason.

 

If a house has cracks in it after an earthquake, it is common. There are products available to put in the cracks that will not only fill the crack but prevent further cracking. I used some of this when I found a long crack in my floor after an earthquake. Not only did it blend in and wasn't very noticeable, but the crack never widened. Many people find that if they put ceramic tile over their concrete floors, they don't have much of a problem with cracks. Sometimes cracks will appear if the house is in a rainy area and the ground gets totally soaked and softened under the house. Of course, you can use wood for a floor and that would alleviate the earthquake/crack problem but now you have the wood/termite thing going.

 

Of course, as you say, everyone has to make their own decisions. But a high-tech building is going to carry a high-tech cost.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would proceed very cautiously with a 'new way of building' here. An female acquaintance has ended up with a half completed house which is totally useless, when she decided to go with an usual technique that was recommended to her. She is now in a 'legal dispute' with her builder....and no-one else that can/wants to complete it.

Will your potential builder give you a guarantee for this 2 months building system? Or is 2 months just for the exterior walls?

The building project 'next door' and the time frame doesn't seem too far off of the mark.

I can't find any info on the company or building process you mentioned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another word of caution - a "guarantee" is worth nothing if the company won't honor it or goes out of business. A good reason for going locally and with someone who has an excellent reputation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ours was built by the same builder and it has cracks and it is only 2 to 3 years old.

 

Concrete cracks, ask anyone in construction. The question is how big are the cracks, and also how many of them are there.

If you are finding a lot of cracks, or they are big cracks, then there was probably a problem with the cement mix. Unfortunately this is common here, just look at the new Caldera hiway. If the construction has not gone to the finish stage, you can have any noticeable cracks filled. But even then, there are the earthquakes, and for that you just have to hope the foundation is good. We are from California, and believe me, with the little quakes that you didn't even feel, there was some effect on the house. Over time, this will show.

 

Best luck, Dana

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ellen - the building process you describe (men mixing cement or concrete by hand and then jabbing it into the hole of concrete blocks with rebar, etc) is typical of many Costa Rican builders. And there's nothing wrong with it. I think we all have to distinguish between what is "wrong" and what is "different." When I was doing some building, I thought it was "wrong" when the laborers didn't fill any remaining gaps between the concrete blocks. However, they did other things that weren't wrong, just different and new to me.

 

We live in a different country where traditions are different, available supplies are different and many times, something is done a certain way for a reason.

 

If a house has cracks in it after an earthquake, it is common. There are products available to put in the cracks that will not only fill the crack but prevent further cracking. I used some of this when I found a long crack in my floor after an earthquake. Not only did it blend in and wasn't very noticeable, but the crack never widened. Many people find that if they put ceramic tile over their concrete floors, they don't have much of a problem with cracks. Sometimes cracks will appear if the house is in a rainy area and the ground gets totally soaked and softened under the house. Of course, you can use wood for a floor and that would alleviate the earthquake/crack problem but now you have the wood/termite thing going.

 

Of course, as you say, everyone has to make their own decisions. But a high-tech building is going to carry a high-tech cost.

I agree, there is nothing wrong however, we are aware of this system from Kees' building experience.

Kees, almost automatically, stops at every building project going on in this country..The car almost knows when to stop and let him have a look.

We understand the building methods in CR and actully find them quite interesting.

We will be beginning the process in August and will keep everyone posted.

Thank you

Hope this helps.

Ellen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, I also use to build and restore homes in the States. I also stop and watch many buildings going up here and there are many different building processes. The only one that I see and do not quite understand is why it seems to me that corners where two walls intersect do not seem to be interlocking but use a solid poured corner with block walls butting up to the solid poured corners. Maybe rebar interlocks but I have watched and saw no rebar to lock corners together. Any body know how the corners are locked together. Thank You Ron USCG Ret

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ron,

 

Don't the running blocks have a shape sort of like an "H" with a space in the middle?

If so, this would allow the poured concrete corner to "interlock" with the blocks from both directions. With the proper concrete mix and rebar I would think that this would make a very secure attachment with great load bearing capability.

 

Of course if they are using blocks that are closed on each end and shaped like an "8" I would think that they could simply knock off the end facing the corner and achieve the same result.

 

Just wondering...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.