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Obamacare and Expats?


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#1 ripple33

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 08:28 AM

Just wonderin how Obamacare bill will impact expats in CR. Will expats be required to carry acceptable insurance in the US since Caja most likely will not be acceptable coverage under this plan? Would hate to have to pick up a additional policy or have to pay penalty for not having US insurance. Anyone have any info on this?

#2 DanaJ

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 09:31 AM

The correct name for the legislation is: H. R. 3962 - To provide affordable, quality health care for all Americans and reduce the growth in health care spending, and for other purposes act. SHORT TITLE.— This Act may be cited as the 6 ‘‘Affordable Health Care for America Act’’.Not "Obamacare".

As for the details regarding expats, I believe that we may not be required to purchase US insurance full time, unless we live in the US for more than a certain period of time (6 months?). So, for those who are living outside the US most of the time, you will only need to purchase short term coverage such as offered by einsurance.com to cover you while you are visiting the US.
This has not been confirmed yet by my representative, but I will let you know when she returns my last email.

Dana J

Edited by DanaJ, 26 March 2010 - 09:49 AM.


#3 jerry w

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 11:12 AM

The correct name for the legislation is: H. R. 3962 - To provide affordable, quality health care for all Americans and reduce the growth in health care spending, and for other purposes act. SHORT TITLE.— This Act may be cited as the 6 ‘‘Affordable Health Care for America Act’’.Not "Obamacare".

As for the details regarding expats, I believe that we may not be required to purchase US insurance full time, unless we live in the US for more than a certain period of time (6 months?). So, for those who are living outside the US most of the time, you will only need to purchase short term coverage such as offered by einsurance.com to cover you while you are visiting the US.
This has not been confirmed yet by my representative, but I will let you know when she returns my last email.

Dana J



#4 jerry w

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 11:19 AM

Dana J, You are obviously an ObamaITE, if you think for a millisecond that Obamacare, More accurately called ObamaNightmarecare is going to be less expensive or in any way improve the quality or availability of health care in the USA then you are ignorant enough to vote for him and his party. Wait until you see what this does!!!!!!! And watch to see the Mass Migration to places like CR...

#5 DanaJ

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 11:40 AM

Dana J, You are obviously an ObamaITE, if you think for a millisecond that Obamacare, More accurately called ObamaNightmarecare is going to be less expensive or in any way improve the quality or availability of health care in the USA then you are ignorant enough to vote for him and his party. Wait until you see what this does!!!!!!! And watch to see the Mass Migration to places like CR...


Now Jerry, no need for the personal insults. I am just as sure that if the exact same thing had been introduced and passed under the Bush-league administration, certain people would be praising it and going on about how wonderful it was.

Personally, I think it sucks, ok?

Personally, I feel that the whole health-care debate has been nothing but an distraction to help keep the eyes of the American people away from the real crimes, the huge tax-payor rip off by the Wall ST banksters. The whole stinking credit default swap fraud has been dumped from the private sector onto the public sector (privatize the profits, socialize the losses). There have been no Congressional hearings, no Justice Dept. investigations, no Wall St banksters marched in handcuffs into court in front of the TV cameras. They are getting away with the biggest fraud in history, totally with out having to pay ANY penalty. Oh, and before you go blaming it all on President Obama, try to remember that the whole bailout was passed in November of 2008, BEFORE Obama was even elected President. The Bush admins last, big hand-grab from the national cookie jar before they left office.

Just my own personal opinion.

Dana J

Edited by DanaJ, 26 March 2010 - 11:42 AM.


#6 cyndy27

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 01:10 PM

I am a little confused. I am seeing comments such as Obamacare being socialized medicine and people complaining about this all the while moving to CR that has socialized medicine. Case in point Rush Limbaugh. And now it is my understanding that CR mandates new residents to buy CAJA. I kinda don't get it as one of my reasons to relocate to CR is because of it's healthcare system. Just sayin

#7 ripple33

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 01:13 PM

I did not really want to open a can of worms or a political discussion. I just want to know how this will effect expats.

by the way, I cant vote rep or dem because they both are crooks. I cant stand Bush and really thought he would go down in history as the worst pres ever until Obama took office. Pointing fingers across the aisle is what they want us to do. They want us to believe that the parties are different but fact is they both represent the same people

#8 ripple33

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 01:18 PM

cyndi there is a huge difference in that CR already has a system and infrastructure in place which by the way is drastically different than what is going through in the US. The US is in the midst of extreme economic distress and extreme debt. US is in no economic position to hinder economic growth and jobs with the largest tax increase in its history. The system needs help but now is not the time and this bill is not the answer.

aNYWAY STILL NEED ANSWERS TO HOW THIS WILL EFFECT EXPATS

#9 pam

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 03:15 PM

I am a little confused. I am seeing comments such as Obamacare being socialized medicine and people complaining about this all the while moving to CR that has socialized medicine. Case in point Rush Limbaugh. And now it is my understanding that CR mandates new residents to buy CAJA. I kinda don't get it as one of my reasons to relocate to CR is because of it's healthcare system. Just sayin

I appreciate your points and the irony , if not hipocracy , that certain pundits and people who scream bloody murder about anything that they think smacks of socialism would so readily take advantage of socialized medicine in Costa Rica.No doubt they'll opt to do the same in the states. And I rather doubt that these people have suffered the fear and misery of being denied health care . Missing something in the empathy department for the millions of hard working Americans who have gone un or underinsured for many years I would have to say.

#10 Epicatt2

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 03:51 PM

I appreciate your points and the irony , if not hipocracy , that certain pundits and people who scream bloody murder about anything that they think smacks of socialism would so readily take advantage of socialized medicine in Costa Rica.No doubt they'll opt to do the same in the states. And I rather doubt that these people have suffered the fear and misery of being denied health care . Missing something in the empathy department for the millions of hard working Americans who have gone un or underinsured for many years I would have to say.

Now what curiouses me most about the arguments against a national health insurance is trying to understand what exactly would be so horrible about setting up a national US medical insurance system that would work like CR's CAJA. Every US citizen would pay a percentage based upon his or her income. This is done in European countries, too.

Not sure what a viable percentage threshold should be for such a US system but perhaps it ought to be on a sliding scale with max and minimum percentages again based upon one's income.

Then there's the argument, "I have private insurance and so should not be obliged the assessement for this US socialized medicine."

Well, I don't have any kids yet I am assessed taxes for the school system locally. I believe that is useful. I'm also assessed for public transporattion yet I almost never use it in the US. (I do use it a whole lot in CR and it works wonderful well for me there.)

Anyway, maybe one of our Forums members can explain some of this simply, in a way that generally non-politically-minded me can understand it.

Cheers!

Paul M.
==

No tengo madre, ni padre,

Ni perro que me ladre . . .
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We all must die, otherwise we would be doomed to eternal senility.

 

                                                                 –  Deepak Chopra interview

                                                                 on 'American Masters' - PBS

 


#11 kenn

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 12:48 AM

Now what curiouses me most about the arguments against a national health insurance is trying to understand what exactly would be so horrible about setting up a national US medical insurance system that would work like CR's CAJA. Every US citizen would pay a percentage based upon his or her income. This is done in European countries, too.

Not sure what a viable percentage threshold should be for such a US system but perhaps it ought to be on a sliding scale with max and minimum percentages again based upon one's income.

Then there's the argument, "I have private insurance and so should not be obliged the assessement for this US socialized medicine."

Well, I don't have any kids yet I am assessed taxes for the school system locally. I believe that is useful. I'm also assessed for public transporattion yet I almost never use it in the US. (I do use it a whole lot in CR and it works wonderful well for me there.)

Anyway, maybe one of our Forums members can explain some of this simply, in a way that generally non-politically-minded me can understand it.

Cheers!

Paul M.
==


Well Paul (and with due terminological apologies to DanaJ), in fact Obamacare isn't like the CAJA or other socialized systems that simply tax people and run a system off those tax dollars, like public schools or buses. (BTW, in the US people are also taxed for roads and motor vehicles, whether or not they drive, so it is not only the strap-hangers who get the taxpayer-subsidized goodies.) To my mind, such a system would be simpler and fairer, but that is not what Obamacare did. Instead, Obamacare works with the free enterprise system, falling all over itself to protect it, and thus ended up with 2400 pages that amounts to roughly the same outcome while also preserving the profits of just about everyone and their brother. People say this is the "American way" and so forth, and maybe the bill had to be crafted in a way that allowed all the doctors and drug companies and hospitals and insurance guys to continue to profit in order to pass. I don't know, but it is reality that Obama and the Democrats had to work like dogs to get this complex monstrosity passed when no way could they have passed a purely socialized system.

However, a very crude and complex substitute for socialized medicine has been passed in the US, and I'm with you in failing to understand the venom directed against it. The way I personally look at it, I was taxed to pay for the health care of about two-thirds of Americans who get their insurance through the government as government employees, veterans, or recipients of Medicare or Medicaid, and paid for the health insurance of others every time I bought a car or TV set or you name it. Yet, that same system told me that I was personally ineligible for health insurance myself because--Guess what?--I was projected to be too expensive. Now, if I have my facts straight, and I'm afraid I do, I was forced to pay for others but denied access myself. To my mind, this amounted to stealing my money and asking me to die. Thus, to those hot heads who complain about Obamacare, I say: You are thieves and murderers. You take my money and then deny me the same access that you force me to pay for on your behalf. You can't sugarcoat this: You are thieves and murderers. This is not merely a difference of opinion.

Do I like Obamacare? No, not really. To my mind a single payer system would be much better. I'm also pretty sure that to make Obamacare work (and to realized the cost savings that the Congressional Budget Office forecasts) will require some tweaking. This is a complicated bill. It would be nice to have Republicans working to make it work, because oversight is crucial, but at the moment most are just grandstanding cry babies who seem to prefer theft and murder. With any luck, some will come around, but only time will tell. Right now they're whining about guys like me actually being able to get health insurance rather than simply paying for their health insurance. It's a pretty selfish position at the moment, and one with all the moral authority of a Nazi.

#12 sectorbets

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 05:45 AM

Kenn, I've never heard it said better.

#13 ripple33

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 07:21 AM

So, everyone has a opinion but nobody has a answer? I dont care if you drink kool aid or not or what you think about this bill. It is what it is and we will have to deal with whatever they have decided that we have to deal with. I am just tryin to figure out how much expats are effected if at all.

#14 Epicatt2

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 07:32 AM

I say thanx, too, Ken. A sensible, understandable explanation, not just for me be for anyone who's been confused by the minutiae of the whole mess.

However I cannot see that the expected (necesary) tweaking you mention will likely bring things much closer to a CR style medical insurance system.

Paul M.
==

No tengo madre, ni padre,

Ni perro que me ladre . . .
- - - - -

 

We all must die, otherwise we would be doomed to eternal senility.

 

                                                                 –  Deepak Chopra interview

                                                                 on 'American Masters' - PBS

 


#15 DanaJ

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 08:52 AM

So, everyone has a opinion but nobody has a answer? I dont care if you drink kool aid or not or what you think about this bill. It is what it is and we will have to deal with whatever they have decided that we have to deal with. I am just tryin to figure out how much expats are effected if at all.


ripple33: I have written my US Representative, and I only received an auto-reply back. But, in talking with some friends & family that work in the health-care industry, they think that expats will NOT have to purchase long-term insurance while they are living outside the US. When they return to the US to visit, they will have to purchase short-term 'trip' insurance, such as from einsurance.com.
The only thing that is not for sure is for those expats that only live outside the US for part of the year. So if you live in the US for 6 month, and in CR for the other 6 months, you MAY be required to purchase some kind of US insurance.
But, like the new CR immigration law, the regs have not been drafted or published yet. So we will just have to wait & see, ok?

And Newman, great response. Like I said, I don't like this bill either, BUT, hopefully at some point, it can be changed for the better. I still don't see why we all just couldn't be offered Medicare (US CAJA), with private ins on the side for those who want to opt out. But that would deprive the health (dont)care execs of thier annual bonus, wouldnt it.

Dana




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