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After finding property to build a home on, what inspections, etc., are needed? This property has a clear title, is located in a small gated community where 2 homes were built during the last couple of years and 3 other properties have been sold. I read that I should apply at ICE for the electricity and they will connect it with 10 days. How do I get the water hooked up? And is there anything special to be done concerning the septic tank? My plan is to buy some sort of temporary pre fab type cabin that I can live in while I get the architect and builder lined up and then be on sight during construction. I'd like to coordinate the utilities and delivery of the cabin so that I can move right in and then begin the process of building. Does anyone have any other suggestions?

Thanks in advance

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After finding property to build a home on, what inspections, etc., are needed? This property has a clear title, is located in a small gated community where 2 homes were built during the last couple of years and 3 other properties have been sold. I read that I should apply at ICE for the electricity and they will connect it with 10 days. How do I get the water hooked up? And is there anything special to be done concerning the septic tank? My plan is to buy some sort of temporary pre fab type cabin that I can live in while I get the architect and builder lined up and then be on sight during construction. I'd like to coordinate the utilities and delivery of the cabin so that I can move right in and then begin the process of building. Does anyone have any other suggestions?

Thanks in advance

There are some posts on the New lake Arenal forum between Fred Morgan, Fincaleola properties and myself on this same subject. The forum is free and you can access the rather long thread between him and I outlining what is needed. I understand there is not a universal country rule but rather each provience has its own rules....john

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After finding property to build a home on, what inspections, etc., are needed? This property has a clear title, is located in a small gated community where 2 homes were built during the last couple of years and 3 other properties have been sold. I read that I should apply at ICE for the electricity and they will connect it with 10 days. How do I get the water hooked up? And is there anything special to be done concerning the septic tank? My plan is to buy some sort of temporary pre fab type cabin that I can live in while I get the architect and builder lined up and then be on sight during construction. I'd like to coordinate the utilities and delivery of the cabin so that I can move right in and then begin the process of building. Does anyone have any other suggestions?

Thanks in advance

 

If the property does not already have all the utilities you need you may have to wait years.

 

RUN!

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If the property does not already have all the utilities you need you may have to wait years.

 

RUN!

Miami......please post regularly that things do not happen in C/R like in the U.S.

That there are lots of folks who wish to dump the problems of property they have

on someone else. No one is in charge....If it isn't Oz it is close to it. I have been

asking questions for a year and a half and I am amazed at the information that

is printed is different from the information that is told....is it just me??????john

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... I have been

asking questions for a year and a half and I am amazed at the information that

is printed is different from the information that is told....is it just me??????

John,

 

No, it is not just you. While there are lots and lots of laws, all in print, in CR it seems de rigeur for each client, clerk, official, agent, attorney, judge, and most every don Fulano, to interpret each particular law in his or her own way.

 

I believe that part of this stems from the strong desire of Ticos to quedar bien. (You can read more about this in the Biensanz' book, "The Ticos".)

 

Regards,

 

Paul M.

==

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John,

 

No, it is not just you. While there are lots and lots of laws, all in print, in CR it seems de rigeur for each client, clerk, official, agent, attorney, judge, and most every don Fulano, to interpret each particular law in his or her own way.

 

I believe that part of this stems from the strong desire of Ticos to quedar bien. (You can read more about this in the Biensanz' book, "The Ticos".)

 

Regards,

 

Paul M.

==

Thanks Paul......I thought it was me.....I will read the Bienaanz book, "The Ticos" as will my friends when i am done. All of us

need to understand the culture we move into or deal with before trying to impose our Gringo ways.......thanks for your posts and enlightenment. john

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I would strongly suggest that you read both www.crexpertise.net and www.die-trying.com . Both sites provide valuable information for purchasing real estate and building in CR. There are many things involved in both endeavors for which foreigners are unprepared. I know many people who have experienced and endured costly and mind boggling setbacks that might have been avoided had they known that " s..t happens " here. The conventional ways in which we resolve most things to our ( the client's ) satisfaction don't exist here , hence it's better to be prepared. Living on or being present at the job site is highly advisable. As for contracts, Ticos don't usually interpret contracts as a 2 way street and doing battle to rectify violations is an ordeal you want to avoid. Most importantly, Never Ever give anyone ( professional or otherwise ) more money than is justified for each phase of construction as specified in your contract or verbally up front. I can't tell you how many people I know who have been left hanging ! That includes houses and very commonly swimming pools. You can end up with nada.

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I would strongly suggest that you read both www.crexpertise.net and www.die-trying.com . Both sites provide valuable information for purchasing real estate and building in CR. There are many things involved in both endeavors for which foreigners are unprepared. I know many people who have experienced and endured costly and mind boggling setbacks that might have been avoided had they known that " s..t happens " here. The conventional ways in which we resolve most things to our ( the client's ) satisfaction don't exist here , hence it's better to be prepared. Living on or being present at the job site is highly advisable. As for contracts, Ticos don't usually interpret contracts as a 2 way street and doing battle to rectify violations is an ordeal you want to avoid. Most importantly, Never Ever give anyone ( professional or otherwise ) more money than is justified for each phase of construction as specified in your contract or verbally up front. I can't tell you how many people I know who have been left hanging ! That includes houses and very commonly swimming pools. You can end up with nada.

Pam........when Andy Brown stops foolling around with the Videos.......you and i are going to talk about putting out some documentarys about the things that most gringos want to know about C/R. Thanks again for all your posts.........john

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Pam........when Andy Brown stops foolling around with the Videos.......you and i are going to talk about putting out some documentarys about the things that most gringos want to know about C/R. Thanks again for all your posts.........john

Hi Builder, My husband and I have for years done our best to inform people of the challenges and cultural and legal differences here that we all at some time have to cope with as residents, full or part time. If you can help someone in some way it's always gratifying be it large or small. It never ceases to amaze us however that most people don't really listen. No matter how factual you are or even theatrical it doesn't sink in ! We 've watched countless people, after listening to us, dive right in to doing something in precisely the way we urged them not to. Of course, the predictable results come crashing down upon them and they're stunned. Maybe people think that we're just opinionated old expats and they should take us with a grain of salt. Maybe , people are so programmed by their 1st world environments that they're incapable of imagining that things function entirely differently in a foreign country. This is particularly true in the field of law and litigation here. Newcomers are dazzled by the beauty of their new surroundings and the smiling faces that surround them. What shocks them most when reality bites is that while Ticos are kind , friendly and accomodating their value system is often at odds with ours. We can't change that but we can certainly acknowledge that and consider that an important factor in how we approach working relationships here. I never regret giving advice or helpful suggestions though I've learned that most people opt to lear n the hard way. We all start out at the bottom of the learning curve here and it's easy to spot where people are on the learning curve when you've been here a long time. I always wish everyone the best of luck and hope their dreams come true in Costa Rica but I also hope they realize sooner than later that dreaming doesn't make a dream come true !

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And _that_ is the most truthful statement on this entire forum.

Thanks, David. I try. Or rather I can't delude myself and see no point in indulging anyone else's' fantasies . We all can choose to either discount information or make use of it. When you get here you need all the pointers you can get. No one was forthcoming with helpful information in the community where we live when we got here. As hard as I tried to pry clues out of local expats they guarded their knowledge zealously and some even I believe took pleasure in watching me stumble and fumble. I don't enjoy watching people struggle so. And it's inevitable that they will to one degree or another. I know you know that !

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" DREAMING DOESN'T ALWAYS MAKE A DREAM COME TRUE"

Pam.......my grandmother told me when I was but a young lad that

"if one did just one good thing to make anothers life better their star

would shine brighter in heaven". I believe that David and I and maybe

some of the others with a little help will be able to pick yours out.

"DREAMING DOESN'T ALWAYS MAKE A DREAM COME TRUE"...

The title for our upcoming Video documentary......as soon as Andy

gets thru messing around....(tongue in cheek). What a great opportunity

exists for us all to care a little more about each other. Thanks again

Pam for reminding us of this.....john

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John---I'm looking forward to your video for sure ---but I must also say, although my very first post was critical of something that Andy Browne did in one of his videos ( he paid a HUGE propina), I find that his "messing around" videos are very valuable to me for showing me the enthusiasm, discovery, and sometimes naivity, that probably virtually all new transplants experience--no matter how much "due diligence" they have done. Although I lived in Guatemala for almost a year ( with a Guatemalan family) and I am somewhat "latinized" I also realize that I will probably make a lot of mistakes upon my permanent move to CR in the near future. And, as Pam says that it seems that nobody listens, ----how true---but I think that it is actually more like---people listen , however their life experiences from back home over-ride what others have told them--but still, they need to hear what others are telling them so that when " the light bulb finally comes on" they can sit back and say "yeah I remember someone saying something about that" and they will know that what they just experienced was NOT UNIQUE to them but is, in fact, they way things are in Costa Rica ( and Latin America in general). So John, Pam, Andy and others, ----please keep telling us anyway !!!!! --and showing us videos too !!!! Sincerely-----Gerald

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Gerald,

 

Very good observations. People do listen but, as you say, they tend to file stuff away and forget about it, then proceed to make the same mistakes so many of us have.

 

Even if we do remember what we were told, because of the way we have learned to operate in our own culture do tend to override that advice, i.e., old habits die hard.

 

There is an old Russian proverb: "When it happens to you you'll know", which also seems to apply here.

 

When one is told that travel is the best education, that is exactly right. And the more we pay attention, the more quickly we will learn how to survive in places like Costa Rica, when we move there.

 

If one accepts the above info s/he can extrapolate from it the how imperative it is to learn Spanish -and to get started studying it asap, learning at least a few basic words, phrases, and the numbers, before moving to CR. The more Spanish one learns/knows when they move to someplace like CR the more quickly they can begin to adjust/adapt to the new culture they elected for themselves and the problems they encounter there will be far less daunting for them.

 

But, all this having been said, I'm not holding my breath that it will change things much. But if one person takes it to heart it will be worth having made the effort to post here.

 

Cheers!

 

Paul

==

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John---I'm looking forward to your video for sure ---but I must also say, although my very first post was critical of something that Andy Browne did in one of his videos ( he paid a HUGE propina), I find that his "messing around" videos are very valuable to me for showing me the enthusiasm, discovery, and sometimes naivity, that probably virtually all new transplants experience--no matter how much "due diligence" they have done. Although I lived in Guatemala for almost a year ( with a Guatemalan family) and I am somewhat "latinized" I also realize that I will probably make a lot of mistakes upon my permanent move to CR in the near future. And, as Pam says that it seems that nobody listens, ----how true---but I think that it is actually more like---people listen , however their life experiences from back home over-ride what others have told them--but still, they need to hear what others are telling them so that when " the light bulb finally comes on" they can sit back and say "yeah I remember someone saying something about that" and they will know that what they just experienced was NOT UNIQUE to them but is, in fact, they way things are in Costa Rica ( and Latin America in general). So John, Pam, Andy and others, ----please keep telling us anyway !!!!! --and showing us videos too !!!! Sincerely-----Gerald

Gerald.....message me if you like.......I traded with a guatamalan local for years and wanted to do some business there but

for whatever reason......it didn't work out. My feeling is that we all have golden opportunity in C/R but need to realize that we are visitors in their country until such time as we become residents. john

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