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try saying otter with an American accent that works!

 

Rich

rich/Wes.......I think this learning to speak another language is getting way out of hand. There are cultures that have survived and only have 300 words. If all cultures are required to reduce their language vocabularys to 300 words then most of us could learn to speak the other language and understand. I can speak a little spanish but cannot understand it. The last time I was in C/R, we had with us a person who works with my son at the local hospital who speaks fluent spanish. She could not understand some of the slang and other spanish spoken there in C/R so.....I called my phone company the other day for a repair. The computer voice told me if I wanted to speak in English......press 1.....Good luck with the language classes. Perhaps just sign language...no vocal would work. john

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Is this a genetic thing or what? Because I can't seam to be able to roll my RS. At all. Is there a way for me to learn? Muchas gracious.

Wes,

 

Here's my suggestion for you -and how we were taught to pronounced the Spanish single 'r' back in my days of studying Spanish at University:

 

Say the English phrase 'pot of gold' but like 'potta gold', which is how we tend to pronounce it in everyday speech.

 

Feel where your tongue taps the ridge in the roof of your mouth when you say 'potta gold'... speciffically the 'tt' part. (That is the alveolar ridge on the roof of your mouth and that is almost exactly where the tongue taps when the Spanish single 'r' is pronounced.)

 

Now once you have mastered the single 'r'...try practicing pronouncing the Spanish words:

 

para [for] - cara [face] - toro [bull] - corazón [heart]

 

until you feel comfortable.

 

So now, producing the double 'rr' in Spanish should become easier the more you try. It is the same movement of the tongue striking the roof of the mouth at the same place, but now allow some air to pass between the tongue and the Alveolar ridge at the same time, while voicing the 'r' and you'll pretty soon have it down pat! You tongue will sort of repeatedly ricochet off the ridge, producing the trilled (or rolled) 'r' that you are trying for.

 

Cheers!

 

Paul M.

==

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Wes,

 

Here's my suggestion for you -and how we were taught to pronounced the Spanish single 'r' back in my days of studying Spanish at University:

 

Say the English phrase 'pot of gold' but like 'potta gold', which is how we tend to pronounce it in everyday speech.

 

Feel where your tongue taps the ridge in the roof of your mouth when you say 'potta gold'... speciffically the 'tt' part. (That is the alveolar ridge on the roof of your mouth and that is almost exactly where the tongue taps when the Spanish single 'r' is pronounced.)

 

Now once you have mastered the single 'r'...try practicing pronouncing the Spanish words:

 

para [for] - cara [face] - toro [bull] - corazón [heart]

 

until you feel comfortable.

 

So now, producing the double 'rr' in Spanish should become easier the more you try. It is the same movement of the tongue striking the roof of the mouth at the same place, but now allow some air to pass between the tongue and the Alveolar ridge at the same time, while voicing the 'r' and you'll pretty soon have it down pat! You tongue will sort of repeatedly ricochet off the ridge, producing the trilled (or rolled) 'r' that you are trying for.

 

Cheers!

 

Paul M.

==

 

lol Paul

 

potta = otter!!!

 

great explanation btw

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Here's one that will sound like you can roll your "R's"...

 

You can learn to say... "Te amo con todo mi corazon".

 

Tay ah-mo cone todo me cortisone.

 

When you say "cortisone" with the accent on the last syllable you will be rolling your R with a good pronunciation of the valuable word, "corazon" (heart). :P

Edited by ciclista
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potta = otter

No. Can't agree.

 

It's 'pah-tah' vs 'ah-tuhr', unless maybe one is perhaps from Baahstahn, Mass.

 

Anyway the ending of 'otter' with the 'urr' slightly changes the value of the preceding 'tt's by causing the tongue to strike the palate behind the Alveolar ridge, not directly on it where Spanish's 'r' is pronounced.

 

Most Gringos may not hear a difference it but most Spanish speakers will be able to tell.

 

The position of the tongue is almost exactly the same for the Spanish 'r' as the 't' sounded in 'pot of gold' when said at conversational speed in English.

 

We were shown line drawings of the mouth cavity and tongue in class so we could learn where the tongue should be to pronounce the Spanish 'r' correctly. I hope I was able to describe it well enough so that others may benefit from the explanation and get it 'right on'.

 

Buena Suerte,

 

Paul M.

==

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Thanx David,

 

That's a great set of tools. I wasn't aware of that site nor of any 'articulation' maps/diagrams as is on this site.

 

Very helpful stuff, that.

 

Here is another very useful URL:

 

http://www.rae.es/rae.html

 

for the Real Acacemia Española (Royal Spanish Academy) and their "Diccionário de la lengua española" (DRAE), where you can look up words and also see their conjugation. It is all in spanish but it's helpful to learn definitions of words in their own language. The DRAE is as ample as the Oxford English Dictionary, but for spanish.

 

I have a copy of the 21st edition of this dictionary on CD-ROM and it is a great tool with a few more features than the online one has. But the online version is more than ample. The current edition is the 22nd ed. and the 23rd ed. is about to be released.

 

Be sure to bookmark the link above as it is a wonderful reference to pair with your personal print copies of Spanish/English and English/Spanish dictionaries.

 

Don't forget that we have 'El Foro en Español' here on the Forums where one can practice one's spanish and there was at least one recent post there from a Tica inviting Forum members to come practice.

 

Saludos a Todos,

 

Paul M.

==

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http://www.rae.es/rae.html

 

...it's helpful to learn definitions of words in their own language. The DRAE is as ample as the Oxford English Dictionary, but for spanish.

 

You're welcome. And thank you for the Spanish excellent dictionary.

 

"

otro, tra.

 

(Del lat. altĕrum, acus. de alter).

 

1. adj. Dicho de una persona o de una cosa: Distinta de aquella de que se habla.

"

 

Now will you please remove my "Warning"?

 

 

BTW there is an Oxford Spanish dictionary. It concentrates on translation from many dialects of Spanish into English. It is big and expensive but I find it to be a treasure.

Edited by MiamiDavid
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