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Is anyone on this forum (who was not born in Costa Rica) a citizen of Costa? Is anyone on this forum (who was not born in Costa Rica) in the process of becoming a citizen of Costa Rica? Especially those who do not have relatives (who are citizens) living in Costa Rica.

 

Those of you who are citizens of Costa Rica: did you keep your citizenship of the country of which you were born? Why or why not? If you kept (or not kept) your citizenship of the country of which you were born, which country are you originally from?

 

Those of you who are in process of becoming a citizen of Costa Rica: which country are you originally from and will your keep your citizenship of the country of which you were born? Why or why not?

 

Please share your experiences of being a citizen of Costa Rica and being in the process of becoming a citizen of Costa Rica.

 

What are the advantages and disadvantages of being a citizen of Costa Rica (other than being able to vote)?

 

What are the advantages and disadvantages of giving up being a citizen of the country of which you were born and being a dual citizen?

 

:o

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Laura, you probably won't get many "in-process" citizens to reply. With very few exceptions citizenship is limited to people born in C.R. We can be temporary or permanent residents but cannot vote. Most of us on the forum are in some stage of investigating, processing, or enjoying the benefits of temporary/permanent residency.

 

Costa Rica is a wonderful place to visit and live but it is so vastly different to what you're accustomed that I'd echo jdo's comment and suggest that you visit many times, different areas, and get to know some of the folk first. I've had 40+ years of Tico families as friends and will be joining them as a resident soon, but still expect surprises.

 

As I wrote in your other thread "slow down".

CD

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Laura, I think another thing that you keep overlooking (or, maybe I am exaggerating the importance of this in my own mind) is that most of us are only able to quality as residents in CR by way of retirement, as opposed to Rentista status. So, if we are of retirement age, perhaps two things are very much in the way to prevent us from considering citizenship in CR. One, the process is very long, and maybe we just don't feel the need to spend our time in this manner, and two, what is the point? There is not very much to be gained by becoming a citizen of CR, for an elderly American, who is living there on a pension.

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As far as I know citizenship takes at least 7 years after residency at this time and that can change. You get to vote and a passport, big deal. The only reason I can think of to get citizenship would be if you wanted to become a Counsel General or the like. I don't think this should be your main concern.

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Laura, I think another thing that you keep overlooking (or, maybe I am exaggerating the importance of this in my own mind) is that most of us are only able to quality as residents in CR by way of retirement, as opposed to Rentista status. So, if we are of retirement age, perhaps two things are very much in the way to prevent us from considering citizenship in CR. One, the process is very long, and maybe we just don't feel the need to spend our time in this manner, and two, what is the point? There is not very much to be gained by becoming a citizen of CR, for an elderly American, who is living there on a pension.

I. personally, being a U.S. citizen,would be extremely wary of getting citizenship in another country. Especially if I was receiving a governlment pension or social security! When you become a citiz<en of Costa Rica, you are swearing allegiane to their country (not a bad thing in itself), but, if I recall correctly, a U.S. citizen cannot do this without running afoul of the State Department, and one could lose their U.S. citizenship, and that could possibly include your pension or social security!!

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As far as I know citizenship takes at least 7 years after residency at this time and that can change. You get to vote and a passport, big deal. The only reason I can think of to get citizenship would be if you wanted to become a Counsel General or the like. I don't think this should be your main concern.

 

 

Dear Saba941,

 

I'm so appreciative of the information you've given me about Costa Rican citizenship (the disadvantages).

 

One thing is for sure, I don't want to be a counsel general.

 

Now I see why no one on the forum is applying to be a citizen of Costa Rica.

 

Sincerely,

 

Laura K

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I. personally, being a U.S. citizen,would be extremely wary of getting citizenship in another country. Especially if I was receiving a governlment pension or social security! When you become a citiz<en of Costa Rica, you are swearing allegiane to their country (not a bad thing in itself), but, if I recall correctly, a U.S. citizen cannot do this without running afoul of the State Department, and one could lose their U.S. citizenship, and that could possibly include your pension or social security!!

 

 

Dear Newman,

 

Thanks for letting me know the risk of Americans becoming citizens of Costa Rica.

 

Not worth the risk of losing benefits and US citizenship.

 

Appreciate the "heads up."

 

Sincerely,

 

Laura K

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I. personally, being a U.S. citizen,would be extremely wary of getting citizenship in another country. Especially if I was receiving a governlment pension or social security! When you become a citiz<en of Costa Rica, you are swearing allegiane to their country (not a bad thing in itself), but, if I recall correctly, a U.S. citizen cannot do this without running afoul of the State Department, and one could lose their U.S. citizenship, and that could possibly include your pension or social security!!

My daughter has dual citizenship, US and Costa Rica. According to the State Department, there are no threats of losing citizenship and any U.S. benefits.

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My daughter has dual citizenship, US and Costa Rica. According to the State Department, there are no threats of losing citizenship and any U.S. benefits.

Yes, until some govvernment lawyer with the State Depasrtment shows up looking to make a name for himself!! Also, I believe that if you check the informnation in your passport , a "heads up" is delineated in writing concerning this topic!!! Always remember. when dealing wiuth the government, no one knows what's correct until it gets to court!! I advise caution!!!!

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Jimmy is right in that at this time the current US State Department policy is only to get involved if. 1 You hold a post with a foreign government requiring an oath. 2 You are an officer in the armed forces of a foreign country. 3 If you hold any position in the armed forces of another country and they are at war with the US. However, this can change at anytime.

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Jimmy is right in that at this time the current US State Department policy is only to get involved if. 1 You hold a post with a foreign government requiring an oath. 2 You are an officer in the armed forces of a foreign country. 3 If you hold any position in the armed forces of another country and they are at war with the US. However, this can change at anytime.

You said it - "US State Department policy" - And I would add "US State Department policy at this TIME". You are cautioned about taking an oath with a foreign government in your (property ofr the US Government) passport - referencing http://travel.state.gov/law/citizenship/citizenship it states that they are operating on a "uniform administrative standard"! I leave it to the individual to draw his own conclusions!!

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You said it - "US State Department policy" - And I would add "US State Department policy at this TIME". You are cautioned about taking an oath with a foreign government in your (property ofr the US Government) passport - referencing http://travel.state.gov/law/citizenship/citizenship it states that they are operating on a "uniform administrative standard"! I leave it to the individual to draw his own conclusions!!

Also see http://wwww.law.cornell.edu/uscode/uscode08 Who in his right mind would even want to play around with something like this?

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I'm sorry, Newman, but neither of your links goes to a real web site. So, perhaps you could tell us where in our passports we will find this caution about "taking an oath" to a foreign gov't?

 

Never mind. I found it, and I would suggest that you look closely at the words: "Under certain circumstances, you may" "by performing, voluntarily and with the intention to relinquish U. S. citizenship,"

Those words do not totally exclude one from accepting dual citizenship, as long as the individual does not intend to give up their U. S. citizenship.

Edited by jdocop
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I'm sorry, Newman, but neither of your links goes to a real web site. So, perhaps you could tell us where in our passports we will find this caution about "taking an oath" to a foreign gov't?

 

Never mind. I found it, and I would suggest that you look closely at the words: "Under certain circumstances, you may" "by performing, voluntarily and with the intention to relinquish U. S. citizenship,"

Those words do not totally exclude one from accepting dual citizenship, as long as the individual does not intend to give up their U. S. citizenship.

I am not a lawyer, and cannot give legal advice!! But, I have been involved in the government all my life, and am totally familiar with how government works!! By the way, the one web site I quoted was with the US DEPARTMENT OF STATE!! The other quoted site goes to the Cornell University. Go to the US Department of State website and search "advice about possible loss of US citizenship and seeking public office in a foreign state". Then, do a search for "loss of citizenship cornell law"! I also am sorry, but one must realize that a person must "look closely" at REAMS of paper when dealing with governmental laws!! In other words, who decides if you do not intend to give up your citizenship? This is a completely arbitrary decision made by some bureacrat in an obscure office! Contained in the REAMS of government documents, hundreds of arguments could be made that you indeed did intend to give up your citizenship!! I refuse to play Russian roulette! In the meantime, you may get on with your clothes dryer/air conditioner modification! Respectfully

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