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I'm studying Spanish and I'm just a beginner so please cut me some slack. Started studying Spanish around July 1st of this year. I'm learning Spanish on my own at this time.

 

One way I'm learning Spanish is translating songs that are in English into Spanish.

 

Recently, I translated (to the best of my ability) the song Eternal Flame by The Bangles.

 

Here are the lyrics to Eternal Flame in English: http://www.lyrics007.com/The%20Bangles%20L...e%20Lyrics.html.

 

Now the actual song, Eternal Flame: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sxf6Xd75yUo.

 

Last but not least, the lyrics in my best Spanish:

 

 

 

 

 

Llama Eternal de The Bangles

 

 

 

Cierra tus ojos, dame tu mano, amado.

Haces sientas mi corazon palpitando, haces comprendes?

Haces sientes el mismo, soy solo sonado?

Es este incendiando a llama eternal?

 

Creo esta mean estar amado.

Vigilo cuando estas durmiendo estas pertenecerme.

Haces sientes el mismo, soy solo sonado?

O es este incendiando a llama eternal?

 

Dice mi nombre sol brillas dejo a lluvia.

A vida entera tan solotaria, y entonces vengas y calamas el dolor.

Yo no necesidad perder este sentimiento.

 

(descanso)

 

Dice mi nombre, sol brillas deja la lluvia.

A vida entera tan solotaria entonces vengas y calamas el dolor.

Yo no necesidad perder este sentimiento.

 

Cierras tus ojos y dama tu mano.

Haces si entes mi corazon palpitando, haces comprendes?

Haces sientes el mismo, soy solo sonado?

O es este incendiando a llama eternal?

 

(descanso)

 

Es este incendiando a llama eternal?

A llama eternal?

 

Cierra tus ojos y dama tu mano.

Haces sientes mi corazon palpitando, haces comprendes?

Haces sientes el mismo, soy solo sonado?

O es este incendiando a llama eternal?

 

 

I don't know how to put the upside down question mark or the accents on the words. Please tell me how to do it if you know how.

 

Eventually, I'll translate songs in Spanish into English.

 

I'll appreciate anyone's help with Spanish.

 

Note: I'm not using Costa Rican Spanish. The assumption is I'm using Spanish from Mexico.

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Also, how to put the "tilde" (symbol over the letter "n") on the letter "n".

 

Help and practice with Spanish on a regular basis would be great.

Edited by TicoGrande

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Also, how to put the "tilde" (symbol over the letter "n") on the letter "n".

 

On a Mac, it's (OPTION n)n. Hold down the option key and press n, then press n alone. I don't know how to do it on a PC but it's probably something similar. Accent mark is (OPTION e) and whatever letter you need. Upside down question mark is OPTION/SHIFT ? (press together). ¿

Is there a keyfinder on your computer? There should be something that shows all these alternate keystrokes somewhere.

 

I can't comment on your translation because I don't know enough Spanish. The Spanish I know is much less complicated but has served me well so far, and I keep learning more every day Just by reading and listening.

Good luck.

Edited by Epicatt2

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I don't know how to put the upside down question mark or the accents on the words. Please tell me how to do it if you know how.

Laura,

 

On a Mac it's:

 

option + shift + ?

 

There have been times when I have been on a site that doesn't permit me to type in the accents so, like David, I will go to a place where the character/accents, etc. are and copy and paste them into my post. Other times I open a Word document (if I'm on a PC) and type the text to my post there with the accents then copy and paste the whole thing into my post.

 

With MS Word go to the menu bar at the top of the page and choose 'insert', then 'symbol' and you will find the accented characters that you need. And when you highlight those characters in their little boxes, at the bottom of the window it will show you the shortcut key combination for the letter in question..

 

Another way to find all those shortcuts on a PC is to use the 'help' function and query 'typing international characters'. That should bring up a file with the needed information in it.

 

Espero que esto le ayude.

 

¡Saludos!

 

Pableo de Tampa

==

Edited by Epicatt2

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you can also use your PC's character map: ¿ ñ è é à ¢ ¡

Start, Programs, Accessories, System Tools, Character Map.....then, just make sure it is set for the font that you are using, and select the character that you want, hit 'copy,' and in the document/on the site, either right click and paste, or simply hit ctrl/v.....

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Thank you, Epicatt2 and Jdocop, for your help on how to add accents and symbols to words in Spanish.

 

I will definitely use the computer programs suggested when typing in Spanish.

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I'm studying Spanish and I'm just a beginner so please cut me some slack. Started studying Spanish around July 1st of this year. I'm learning Spanish on my own at this time.

 

One way I'm learning Spanish is translating songs that are in English into Spanish.

 

I'll appreciate anyone's help with Spanish.

 

Note: I'm not using Costa Rican Spanish. The assumption is I'm using Spanish from Mexico.

 

HI, Laura,

This is just a suggestion, but I would think it would be time better spent to study conversational Spanish than to translate songs, which are going to give you sentence structure and wording not used in the everyday world. My own studies have consisted of several language books, including a very good one on verbs, and listening to language CDs. I also watch American television while reading the Spanish subtitles, and listen to Spanish television as well to get the pronunciation and accent. When you are here living in the language everyday, take advantage of every opportunity to speak to the locals in their language. I do that, and sometimes I don't even know what I said (lol) but no one has ever made fun of me to my knowledge. If I really blow it, they will help me say what I mean. Lots of good help here from store clerks, taxi drivers, passengers on the buses, etc.

And, yes, from us other norteamericanos. Might be good help, might be bad, but you can count on our two cents worth.

Good luck.

Shea

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HI, Laura,

This is just a suggestion, but I would think it would be time better spent to study conversational Spanish than to translate songs, which are going to give you sentence structure and wording not used in the everyday world. My own studies have consisted of several language books, including a very good one on verbs, and listening to language CDs. I also watch American television while reading the Spanish subtitles, and listen to Spanish television as well to get the pronunciation and accent. When you are here living in the language everyday, take advantage of every opportunity to speak to the locals in their language. I do that, and sometimes I don't even know what I said (lol) but no one has ever made fun of me to my knowledge. If I really blow it, they will help me say what I mean. Lots of good help here from store clerks, taxi drivers, passengers on the buses, etc.

And, yes, from us other norteamericanos. Might be good help, might be bad, but you can count on our two cents worth.

Good luck.

Shea

 

Dear Shea,

 

Thanks for the suggestions. I will definitely take your advice.

 

Will still translate songs in addition to your suggestions.

 

How about me practicing Spanish with you?

 

Sincerely,

 

Laura K

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Hola Laura,

 

I tend to agree with Shea on what she suggested. You will be surprsed at how much, how fast, you will begin to pick things up once you are immersed in the language and everyday culture here. It doesn't take long for you to start thinking in spanish or, not thinking at all when you say something; its just comes out. It was a revelation for me when that started happening as I did not realize I was doing it until a week or so after it started happening.

 

An as to the songs/translating. I think the songs are okay to translate, but like Shea said, will not give you conversational practice. Listening to them for comprehension, however, is a useful vocabulary-building practice and is also a both a source of intertainment and a window into the tico culture.

 

Muy buena suerte a Ud. con sus estudios.

 

¡Saludos!

 

Pablito de Tampa

==

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Hello Laura,

 

I share your passion for learning Spanish later in life and wouldn’t dream of traveling without some knowledge of the language. Besides being fun it stretches our brains in places that haven’t been visited since birth. Forget Sudoku to prevent Alzheimers -- I’ll take Spanish !

 

I have found my DVD collection is proving a tremendous resource in surprising ways.

 

I first watch familiar movies using Spanish subtitles. I sit with my laptop and a program called Ultralingua to boost my vocabulary from the subtitles. Then I watch them in Spanish to learn pronunciation, using English subtitles to keep track.

 

Then I watch them in Spanish with Spanish subtitles (they are always VERY different) This is incredibly helpful ! You immediately notice the differences and it causes you to consider why. It reinforces literally everything by comparing what you hear to whatever the transcriber felt like typing. It’s so effective it’s exhausting to maintain for very long. In fact, it’s almost exactly like the Rosetta Stone Method level three.

 

Also try changing the language on your Computer. On a Mac it switches every single word (even those in each program) to Spanish. It’s fantastic and also rather exhausting.

 

If you are familiar with eBay you can try surfing the Spanish site. And if your really into challenges try the Chinese eBay !

 

Buena Suerte

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Hello Laura,

 

I share your passion for learning Spanish later in life and wouldn’t dream of traveling without some knowledge of the language. Besides being fun it stretches our brains in places that haven’t been visited since birth. Forget Sudoku to prevent Alzheimers -- I’ll take Spanish !

 

I have found my DVD collection is proving a tremendous resource in surprising ways.

 

I first watch familiar movies using Spanish subtitles. I sit with my laptop and a program called Ultralingua to boost my vocabulary from the subtitles. Then I watch them in Spanish to learn pronunciation, using English subtitles to keep track.

 

Then I watch them in Spanish with Spanish subtitles (they are always VERY different) This is incredibly helpful ! You immediately notice the differences and it causes you to consider why. It reinforces literally everything by comparing what you hear to whatever the transcriber felt like typing. It’s so effective it’s exhausting to maintain for very long. In fact, it’s almost exactly like the Rosetta Stone Method level three.

 

Also try changing the language on your Computer. On a Mac it switches every single word (even those in each program) to Spanish. It’s fantastic and also rather exhausting.

 

If you are familiar with eBay you can try surfing the Spanish site. And if your really into challenges try the Chinese eBay !

 

Buena Suerte

 

 

Dear Alaskgrrl,

 

Thanks for the great ideas.

 

Watching shows in Spanish on tv does help.

 

When I can, I'll get Spanish lessons on CD and DVD.

 

Spanish subtitles on movies in English is worth trying.

 

Sincerely,

 

Laura K

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I agree that watching movies in spanish is a useful idea, but the subtitles often are not really too close to the actual spoken english dialogue, so in my opinion, they are not the best value for learning for the beginner. (Subtitles are certainly useful for building vocabulary, though.)

 

Now watching a spanish movie in its original language is great for the imtermediate learner and beyond, but may be more off-putting than helpful for the beginner. But.....

 

I DO strongly recommend the telenovels (sopa operas) on spanish TV. As I mentioned elsewhere, the dialogue between the characters is very helpful and since it is more like interchanges you would hear everyday and because it is being delivered by professional actors, those dialogues are spoken with clarity and good diction. Very useful indeed. If you have cable in the US you should be able to find a couple spanish stations to practice listening to.

 

(Actually some of the telenovelas are quite well written and acted, often believable, even; far more so than their US counterparts.)

 

Others have suggested watching the evening news on the spanish TV stations. This is useful since one has probably already seen the news that day in english and will have an idea of the topics being reported on in spanish.

 

Okay, good luck with your practicing of spanish.

 

Cheers!

 

Paul M.

==

Edited by Epicatt2

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I DO strongly recommend the telenovels (sopa operas) on spanish TV. As I mentioned elsewhere, the dialogue between the characters is very helpful and since it is more like interchanges you would hear everyday and because it is being delivered by professional actors, those dialogues are spoken with clarity and good diction.

 

Also great for developing a sense of Fashion for those of us to whom it matters ~ !

 

I also recently hired a guy who spends winters in Tijuana Mexico. He rolled his R's like a machine gun, and was good practice for me. Even though it's not that strong in CR it helped alot.

 

N

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I DO strongly recommend the telenovels (sopa operas) on spanish TV. As I mentioned elsewhere, the dialogue between the characters is very helpful and since it is more like interchanges you would hear everyday and because it is being delivered by professional actors, those dialogues are spoken with clarity and good diction.

 

Also great for developing a sense of Fashion for those of us to whom it matters ~ !

 

I also recently hired a guy who spends winters in Tijuana Mexico. He rolled his R's like a machine gun, and was good practice for me. Even though it's not that strong in CR it helped alot.

 

N

 

 

Dear Alaskagrrl,

 

I will watch the telenovels on tv. Thanks for the great advice.

 

Interesting who Spanish is different in different countries just like English.

 

Sincerely,

 

Laura K

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