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With the "Political Winds" blowing from the good old USA with a possible "DT" Presidency; our next Migrant Invasion to Ticoland may very well be from the good old USA.

Edited by tibas9

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It's kind of ironic, isn't it? So many thousands of immigrants are wanting to get INTO the US and then there's a whole bunch that's wanting to get OUT!

 

I've been following up on a couple of Cuban refugees who are now living and working in the US and: "It's cold," "It's hard to find work..." "The organizations to help us have run out of money..." "Transportation is very expensive." are some of the comments.

At least one of them was living in a small apartment in Houston with four other guys and he's very frustrated because he's the only one paying the electric bill and the temporary job he had with a roofing company is over and just before the big flood, he moved to Dallas. He's now asking about how to apply for residency in Costa Rica.

 

I'm in the process of applying for Costa Rican citizenship and looking into giving up my US passport. (You don't have to be a US citizen to collect Social Security benefits.) My one and only question would be: How difficult would it be to get a visa to visit the US if I had only a Costa Rican passport. I doubt if anyone could/would give me an answer to that.

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Eleanorcr - I'm curious why you would give up your passport? Then you ask if you could get a Visa to go back to the US. You are an icon posting on this site and give very good council. I am hopeful you have thought out why you want to do this....especially if you may consider visiting in the future. I am sure you are well-read on the ramifications of such an action....and understand "and looking into giving up my US passport"....which may not mean you have made such a decision....

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Eleanor,

 

Will you live long enought after renouncing your US Citizenship to not have to pay US taxes, I wonder?

 

Many folks aren't aware that if a person renounces his or her citizenship from the US that the IRS will continue to assess taxes on the party's income for up to ten years afterwards!

 

Also, there are significant sanctions placed on one's monetary & other assets in the US upon renouncing citizenship. That is around 30% of the value of the equity that is assessed, from what I read. A pretty big bite, that.

 

Anyway, good luck if that is your intention.

 

Regards,

 

Paul M.

==

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1. I have no US assets.

 

2. I don't pay any taxes. (I don't make enough money to pay taxes....)

 

There is a fee associated with renouncing your citizenship -- that may be the real stumbling block for me since I think it is several thousand dollars, if I remember correctly.

 

I suppose I could just go to the Embassy and throw my passport over the fence. ;)

 

And yes, I have looked into giving up my passport. Which contemplate doing if I just become so ashamed of my birth country. I know the ramifications -- except for the one about getting a visa to visit family in the US. If I should ever actually go through with giving up my passport, I'll just have to make my family visit me here.

 

Edit: To expand a bit: I have no assets in the US. I have no US driver's license and I have no US credit cards. Everything I have (and it's not much...) is in Costa Rica.

Edited by eleanorcr

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So.. "throw over the fence" is looking better.

 

$2350. It would be interesting to know how they came up with that figure.

 

"Let's see .... there's the time that the clerk has to spend logging in a returned passport, the envelope they put it in to forward it to storage, an extra security guard to make sure no one gets hurt or property damaged, the change to the list of "citizens of the US," checking for assets, checking Interpol..... yeah.... about $2350 would do it."

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The U.S. is not so easy to visit. Ask any Tico.

 

My take would be to keep the citizenship to have the passport. It's only a piece of paper and doesn't change where your heart is.

 

T

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I agree. Maybe you have some years before your passport expires and you can continue to consider. There may be some of us that are watching once-in-a-lifetime events unfold in the US right now, but I', not sure that outweighs denouncing....my opinion.

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Good advice from both of you. Thanks.

 

I am not rabid about the whole thing -- but just really disgusted and began doing some research about what would be involved.

 

When my mother died, my sister and I had a lot of long conversations. Among them -- "Mom always loved you best because you were the 'good girl' and never gave her any trouble" "No" my sister said "Mom always loved you best because you were the 'rebel' and she admired that because she never had the courage to be that."

 

So here I am again, "The Rebel." hahaha Just one more instance in a long line of "rebellions." (And yes, I once quit a high-paying job in the computer industry by telling my boss to "Take this job and shove it")

 

Remember the Vietnam Vets who threw their medals over the fence? A futile gesture, perhaps, on their part and on my part should I decide to do something similar. But who can put a price on pride? My ancestors hacked out a civilization in the Virginia wilderness in 1642 and when their descendants made a decision to cut ties with their "old" country, it must have been very difficult. But they did it in a kind of "consequences be damned" mindset.

 

Frankly, the one and only downside I see (besides the $2350) would be the inability to get a visa to visit family in the US. I don't know if it would easier (having been a US citizen for many years) or more difficult (renouncing that citizenship) or the same as any other Costa Rican. But as I have said, if it becomes impossible for me to visit the US, so be it. My family can visit me here.

 

Good discussion, though.

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It's kind of ironic, isn't it? So many thousands of immigrants are wanting to get INTO the US and then there's a whole bunch that's wanting to get OUT!

 

I've been following up on a couple of Cuban refugees who are now living and working in the US and: "It's cold," "It's hard to find work..." "The organizations to help us have run out of money..." "Transportation is very expensive." are some of the comments.

 

I'm sorry some people are having a tough time. I feel like some of the comments are fairly non important, like the "it's cold" one and "it's hard to find work". It's hard to find work everywhere, and as a recent refugee immigrant it's going to be even more difficult. I'm a well educated teacher with plenty of resources and a support system in CR and it still took me six months to find a job. I was honestly happy I found one in under a year! I know we always seem to squabble over things like this, but I love my country. It's not perfect, but I love living here and realize how lucky I am to have been born in this country with such a powerful passport. The organizations running out of money is really unfortunate. But no one should expect to show up in a new country and have a road of gold paved in front of them. It takes hard work and determination to make a life in a new country. We all know that! (I'm not saying that the people you are in contact with aren't trying, just that it takes a lot of work, it's not easy.)

 

Also, about everyone wanting to leave- that sort of stuff really irritates me. Mostly because people in the USA, for the most part, are ignorant as to what it takes to move abroad. We think we can take our powerful US passport, show up in a new country and just start working and living like we were born there. This is evident by all the posts we get here, all the messages I get on facebook about wanting to move to CR "to live the simple life", and all the ridiculous "I'm moving to Canada" statements. Yeah? Under what visa?

 

 

 

 

$2350. It would be interesting to know how they came up with that figure.

 

 

It's all arbitrary. Especially for the amount of waiting time and lack of support you get during the process. Applying for my husband's 10 year greencard right now and that set us back a fun $590. Applying for it the first time around was around $903 total (excluding the $80/package for DHL-ing stuff up, like 6 times). And to apply for citizenship (one more year!) it'll be $680. But I'm more than willing to part with that money to be done with the obtuse people at USCIS once and for all!

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Only sort off topic: I remember the night of the election in 2004, looking at emigrating to Canada ... to Australia ... to New Zealand ... Couldn't afford any of them, as we didn't have a spare 2 mil (and, no that's not mil, but million), but just looking gave me a degree of comfort.

 

Eventually the pendulum will swing back and good sense will reappear.

 

regards,

Gayle

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Elenor, just hold onto the US passport, if you also have a CR one, use that if you travel to other countries. But I would ask the US embassy about this first. It may make going back to the states to visit much more difficult than its worth.

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Dana - am hoping to get an answer from the Embassy about how difficult it will be to get a visa if I return my passport - but not sure I will get ANY kind of answer. It could go both ways.... That's something I have to sort out in my mind: How would it be for me if I could not visit the US. (Welcome back...)

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