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      IMPORTANT - READ BEFORE POSTING to SUPPORT FORUM   01/28/2011

      Posts to this Support Forum are to be related ONLY to one's ARCR membership.   Please post all other types of questions to the appropriate forum.   Only Forums Moderators, Administrators and ARCR Employees ae able to make any replies to this ARCR Support Forum.   Paul M. Forums Moderator ==
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Stoic

New to ARCR, moving to Costa Rica in 2017

112 posts in this topic

Good info, Terry. After I wrote that, I was wondering if there was some provision for a spouse -- thanks for clearing that up.

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I know that there are private clinics, but the vast majority of professional employment is in the GAM. In any case to get almost any kind of professional job, especially in the health fields, one must be certified by the local gremio o colegio profesional. This usually requires getting some kind of certification from an approved program or university. I'm just saying that certification and experience from the US might not mean very much here without additional training that will almost certainly be in Spanish.

 

Does having a work permit count towards the three years required for permanent residency or the seven required for citizenship? If not, loosing one's job can mean loosing one's right to remain in the country.

Edited by induna

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Yes, Siobhan would be required to be re-certified, in Spanish of course.

 

A work permit must be applied for, every year...and doesn't count towards Permanent residency. If the position is terminated or the worker quits the visa is immediately, invalid.

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Just a FYI I think is new. Maxipali has a website that shows prices for groceries and common household items. maxipali.co.cr.

 

HTH

 

Bob

 

 

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Just a thought to jump back to the ultrasound tech- while I'm sure your skills are very professional, I would never want someone who speaks "a little" of my language to have anything to do with my medical procedures. I don't mind accents, but I need to be able to clearly communicate with my healthcare provider. Perhaps there is s need for English speaking, but I highly doubt it as most doctors in private clinics and hospitals already speak English.

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In any of the hospitals clinics here, the majority of patients will be Spanish speaking Costa Ricans, so one would have to be proficient in Medical Spanish language. I have a medical dictionary that my friend who is a nurse in the USA, gave me... and I thought learning the 'regular' Spanish langue was difficult enough :blink:

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House will be up for sale in a couple of weeks. We're boxing up things that will be going to Costa Rica eventually. Not too much stuff. We should be moving in July.

 

I decided there's no big rush to get residency started. If we have to go Rentista, we won't have enough money to begin setting up a homestead, and running a business there will be too complicated..... at least for 4+ years. If that's the case, we may just live in CR for a year or two, while establishing residency elsewhere. If I can go Vinculo, we can get to work : )

 

I will be flying in to CR after our US home sells (hopefully before June) to look for a place to live short-term, and to get a better idea of residency options.

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Stoic - I am totally confused by your post!

 

I can understand that if you use the Rentista category of residency that you won't have enough money to "set up a homestead" - but - what does residency have to do with setting up a business? What kind of business are you thinking of? Besides -- if you use the rentista category, you can always rent until you get your permanent residency which will give you plenty of time to look around and see where you want to be. Why 4 years?

 

"establishing residency elsewhere" -- why would you establish residency elsewhere? There is a lot of controversy over the "perpetual tourist" model which is a person who moves to Costa Rica and has no intention of becoming a legal resident and remains in the country only by leaving the country every 90 days to renew their tourist visa. It is frowned on but not illegal - yet - and restrictions by border agents can make it difficult.

 

Why would you have to be actually IN Costa Rica to "get a better idea of residency options." When you say "residency options" - do you mean, a better idea of where to live or a better idea of legal residency?

 

Perhaps you are using the term "residency" in two ways: where you live and the legal terminology. If this is the case, then that accounts for a lot of my confusion. In this forum, when we say "residency" it generally means "legal residency status."

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Hi Eleanor.

 

The business ideas I am considering involve making a product in CR, or providing a service there, on the ground. Money tied up in the temp residency process (rentista) is money I cannot use in the business. By "residency" I mean formal residency recognized by the state. And my understanding is with temp residency I'd only be legally able to manage the business but couldn't really interact with the public. That would kill the deal.

 

If I did not establish residency in CR, I would still need to establish it elsewhere. I want to leave the US, get another passport for me and my family, and never have to return. If CR residency is too big a deal, I'll get started with the process elsewhere. We will be moving to CR this summer, and we will be spending a lot of time there for the next couple of years. There is a lot of family to see, and my wife is not comfortable with our moving to a country where we do not have relatives close by, not with our boys still being young. Leaving every 90 days for a while will be a hassle, but I'm sure she will want to go back to the US once in a while anyways, and I'll want to fly out of CR for bird hunting trips.

 

I'll be going to CR to speak with people about my residency options. There are questions I'd prefer to have answered face to face. My wife and I do not have government docs stating we are married, so I want to know the best way to go about satisfying those requirements. As far as showing means of supporting myself, I want to get specific answers on how to satisfy those requirements. In my particular case, I lived in CR for some years when I was a child. I have old passports stamped, and preschool photos and documents, so will those count towards "time in residence"? Is it cut and dried, or is there some level of bureaucratic discretion there? What documents will I need to get from my Costa Rican father? These are all things I want to get answers to face to face, so I can come back to the US and get what I need together. Are there documents in CR that will help my case (ER visits, baptism, first communion, etc), in which case I may not need to go through the time and expense of getting some docs in the US?

 

Via Southwest Air I can roundtrip for under $50, the flight is about 3 hrs each way, I can bring some household items in, and I can stay with relatives for whatever handful of days I'd be there, so cost is pretty low. And I might want to check out a few places to live before bringing the family in.

Edited by Stoic

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Was your birth ever registered in the Costa Rican Registro Civil? If it was, you may have a direct path to citizenship even though you are older than 25 and were born outside of Costa Rica. See http://www.tse.go.cr/servicios_atencionpersonal.htm and look under Naturalizaciones.

 

If your birth is not in the Registro Civil, you may be able to register it and then pursue citizenship. Look under Inscripciones on the same site.

 

If you can obtain citizenship, your minor children will be immediately eligible for citizenship. Your wife will be eligible for temporary residency Libre Condición, and eligible for citizenship after living here with you for two years. In addition to all of this, Naturalization is essentialy free. The only cost will be that of obtaining the proper documents.

 

I think it is important to point out that if you want to go this route, you should discuss your options with someone experience in Naturalizations and not Residencies. They are very different things and go through two totally different government agencies that have their own peculiarities.

 

Good luck.

Edited by induna

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Well, big delays in getting the house listed, but we're just a handful of days away. Have gotten rid of a lot of stuff!

 

I have about 200# of books I want to bring down, but they don't have to all arrive at once. I'm hoping friends and family can bring them down bit by bit. Aside from the books and a bicycle I think we'll just be bringing what will fit in our checked bags : )

 

Then there's the issue of getting our dog in. She's about 14#. Just a ballpark, how much do you think it'll cost? She'll probably stay behind for a few weeks, and then maybe my parents can bring her down.

Edited by Stoic

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If you buy a business class ticket, you can bring a lot of stuff in checked bags. Check with the airline to see how many free ones they allow and what the cost is if you go over that. Still.... MUCH cheaper than shipping stuff. And you get that nice business class service.

 

As for your dog -- also check with various airlines about bringing your dog and flying with your dog in the cabin, etc. At 14 pounds, it shouldn't be a big deal. Mostly you will need vet papers indicating vaccinations, general health, etc. Note that some airlines will not fly dogs in hot summer months.

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I have about 200# of books I want to bring down, but they don't have to all arrive at once. I'm hoping friends and family can bring them down bit by bit. Aside from the books and a bicycle I think we'll just be bringing what will fit in our checked bags : )

 

 

Hey Stoic,

 

Good luck with the house.

 

Just a suggestionon the books: Consider using Charlie Zeller for some or any of the books if you don't have enough friends & family coming to CR to get all of them brought to you.

 

Charlie has a decent rate for shipping used books or household goods:

 

2.5 cu ft carton = $35.00US (need to verify)
5 cu ft / 90# carton = $90.00US (max 90lbs for this size)
Here are his contact numbers & info:

 

Tels.: 506-2431-1234 / 506-2258-8747

Office Hours: M-F / 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Tollfree: 1-866-245-6923 (from USA)
Email: shiptocostarica@racsa.co.cr
URL: www.solutionscostarica.com/relocating/
[NOTE, Call him during his office hours, CR time. If he's not in –he may be in Pto. Limón clearing someone's shipment that arrived. In that case his secretary who speaks some basic english can let you know when to call back. I recommend using Skype in case you must try several times; it's much cheaper. Once you get ahold of him you will find him very helpful.]
==
His office/warehouse in west central Florida at Port Manatee:
Pack 'N Stow
Ineke (Port Manatee = his sister; works at the office there)
cell - 813.313.9411
Charlie/cell - 813-313-9057 (when in Florida)
bus - 941.981.3880
If you or friends & family are or are going to be anywhere near Port Manatee, FL, you can take things to there warehouse yourself; just call ahead to be sure they are in the office. I'm in Tampa so it was very easy for me –about 40 minutes– to drive my stuff down to the warehouse.
I have sent stuff using Charlie's services several times to CR & everything arrived safely with nothing broken.
Remember your items will be traveling by sea so plan to get your stuff to him well ahead of time. I took my stuff to the warehouse about three weeks before my flight to CR and dropped them off. They showed up about ten days after I arrived, easy as pie. Plus they were delivered to me at my apartment in Alajuela Centro with no further charge.
Sorry this got so long, but PM me if you have further QQs!
Cheers!
Paul M.
==

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Thanks for the ideas.

 

I'll give Charlie a call. Have never used Skype, but that's something we should start familiarizing ourselves with now.

 

Yes, having a smaller dog might mean someone can fly down with her. We like SWA because it's cheap and we're based near Houston. I don't think SWA will let us bring a dog into the cabin on international, but it'd be worth paying a bit more to fly a more expensive airline to bring the dog. Maybe one of my parents can do that.

 

We're excited. Probably will AirBNB for a few weeks while we check things out and settle on a long-term place.

Edited by Stoic

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We used Charlie to ship a 40 foot container here. We were very pleased with his services. Everything arrived intact. Nothing was broken or missing. Should we ever move back to the States, we wouldn't hesitate to use him again.

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