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      IMPORTANT - READ BEFORE POSTING to SUPPORT FORUM   01/28/2011

      Posts to this Support Forum are to be related ONLY to one's ARCR membership. Posts inappropriate to the Support Forum will be removed without comment. Please post all other types of questions to the appropriate Forum. Only Forums Moderators, Administrators and ARCR Employees ae able to make any replies to this ARCR Support Forum. Paul M. Forums Moderator ==
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Stoic

New to ARCR, moving to Costa Rica in 2017

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eleanorcr    0

And yet, since then there have been changes in policy, reflected in the giving of visas of less than 90 days -- sometimes as little as 5 days -- for people who are obviously perpetual tourists. It doesn't happen 100% of the time, but it does happen.

 

In my view, he was only following what the current law reflected in 2012. There is no specific law against it. And so -- it is "not illegal but not legal."

 

A friend and I took a two-day mini vacation and spent some time at a touristy beach. (Not Tamarindo which makes me just shudder to think of going there.... lol). Of the three restaurants where we ate, only one of them had Costa Rican staff. The others had obvious PTs as servers -- and possibly as cooks or dishwashers. So -- what about the Costa Ricans that had their jobs taken by these PTs? I would venture to say that lots of restaurants and shops at beaches have PTs working there.

 

I also think that the impact of North American foreigners on the economy is overrated. If you just look at the numbers, as Induna wrote, then it is actually less than miniscule.

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If you don't want hot weather, Atenas is a little hotter than most. It is cooler in Grecia and if you want a little cooler just go up the mountain a bit. Lived in Oklahoma for total of 19 years and know hot also.

 

But it sounds like you may be putting cart before the horse a bit, with such positive statements about moving here, but insinuates you have not visited???. If you want a real culture shock, San Jose may not be the place for you.

 

Just opinion. Based on what you said, and having a family, think it would be good to do lots of reading and investigating. I and my husband love it here, but not for everybody.

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induna    0

You know, people can continue to make all the arguments they want about how perpetual tourism will never go away. They can even insist that PTs are good for CR, or that CR immigration laws are unfair,etc. Heck, maybe they are even right about the first one. I don't know. But the fact is that it can go away at any time with the stroke of a single pen, with no due process, because none is required, and with absolutely no legal recourse on the part of PTs, who have no legal status here once they step across the border. Every PT should understand that. The more complacent, arrogant, and blatant the PTs are, the more likely it is that the CR government will choose to act.

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Epicatt2    0

Absolutely, Induna.

 

But unfortunately some people pensist in believing what they want to believe. Or they convince themselves that those regulations do not apply to them, or at the least won't affect them and that they'll manage to squeak by.

 

Sure, some do squeak by and some have done so for quite a number of years, but it takes only once to get caught and be deported.

 

Each time this battery of arguments manages to raise its scaly head, I am reminded of a certain Russian proverb:

 

When it happens to you, you'll know.

 

Regards,

 

Paul M.

==

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Stoic    0

If you don't want hot weather, Atenas is a little hotter than most. It is cooler in Grecia and if you want a little cooler just go up the mountain a bit. Lived in Oklahoma for total of 19 years and know hot also.

 

But it sounds like you may be putting cart before the horse a bit, with such positive statements about moving here, but insinuates you have not visited???. If you want a real culture shock, San Jose may not be the place for you.

 

Just opinion. Based on what you said, and having a family, think it would be good to do lots of reading and investigating. I and my husband love it here, but not for everybody.

 

I live in Houston. I've spent time in other parts of the USA, and it is just way more hot and humid here than just about anywhere else in the States.

 

I have been to CR, though. My grandparents lived in Santo Domingo and I spent a little time there. No, I wouldn't even TRY to do San Jose. Guanacaste is very nice, but it's low on the list mostly because of the heat. I don't want the city, but we'll probably be in Heredia in the beginning just because it will likely be a less bumpy place to start.

 

I laid out some of the positive things earlier, because I was asked what I hoped to get from the move, or something along those lines. If Eleanor had asked what I thought the challenges or dislikes would be, I would have had a long list.

Edited by Stoic

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Epicatt2    0

Part of the reason it can feel so hot in CR is due to the latitude (only 9º above the equator) which allows the sun's light to pass through the atmosphere at a more perpendicular angle to the earth's surface. Thus there is less atmosphere to filter the strength of the sunlight, so it is noticeably stronger and feels hotter.

 

My apartment is in Alajuela. Before the rainy season begins in earnest it can get up to around 80 to 83F for the air temperature. So if I stay in the shade when walking abround town then it isn't too bad. But if I walk around in the sun, two or three minutes is all it takes for me to be perspiring enough to dampen my shirt.

 

But once the rainy season gets underway the temps in Alajuela Centro go down to around 75F and stay there unless we miss a couple days of rain, which lets the temperature start to climb back up. And also I enjoy the rainy part of the year there since are fewer tourists around then.

 

Alternately, here in west central Florida from June through September, sometimes later, it often stays in the low- to mid-90s and a times doesn't drop below 80F at night for weeks at a time. It's like a sauna. So I like to be in CR during the rainy season since it allows me an escape from that Florida Summer Sauna.

 

 

Cheers!

 

Paul M.

==

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tibas9    0

This from Mario Zamora Cordero, security minister Oct. 2012:

Another Long-Ago Tico Politician that has disappeared "like-the-wind".

Edited by tibas9

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eleanorcr    0

Mario Zamora did a great job and I was sad to see him go. There were lots and lots of improvements in police departments, including more equipment etc, as well as improvements in Migracion. Not sure what he is doing now (too lazy to Google!!) but I hope for the best for him and hope he will be back in government some day. He may have "disappeared" from daily news stories but he is probably not doing anything "newsworthy."

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Stoic    0

Got started this month on getting the U.S.A. house ready for sale :) Won't be up for sale for several months, but this is when the move starts to seem more real!

 

I might head to CR later in the year to touch base with contacts and decide how I want to proceed with foreign residency applications.

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Siobhan    0

It boils down to the money, your kids and what type of environment you want to live in. Home schooling is illegal in Costa Rica, in case you are figuring on that.

 

There is some really good information here that you should read carefully: http://costaricalaw.com/

 

Understand that work permits are VERY difficult to get unless, as someone else wrote, you have some kind of "special" skill that would be very valuable in Costa Rica. Working online is your best bet.

 

We've all had "The Dream" and we are not trying to sour you on your dream, but just trying to be realistic so you don't have any ugly surprises.

Hello, Iam new to your forum. My husband and I are coming to vacation in CR Sept-Oct. Our kids are grown and we are looking at places that we may potentially retire. With that said, I work in the health field as a registered diagnostic medical ultrasound technologist with 15 years experience (and 10 years exp as a nurse). I work ft in a hospital and 50 percent of my patients speak spanish. I do speak alittle and am currently studying to learn more. With legal requirements met , do you have any idea what the job market is like ultrasound technologists?

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eleanorcr    0

With your specialty, it's very possible that you could get a work permit. However, your Costa Rican employer would have to do that. And the "ultimate" test is whether a Costa Rican is available and could do the same work -- they don't want "foreigners" to displace Costa Ricans in the work force. Of course, your pay would be MUCH less than you are used to.

 

Depending on where you go during your Costa Rican vacation, you could contact a doctor or private clinic and get some realistic information from them. For instance, if you fly into Liberia, you could visit the excellent Arcangel San Rafael clinic and hospital. They are top-notch in that area. There's also a Clinica Biblica and CIMA in the Liberia area so you have three good clinics to visit and ask questions. You have a good "first step" by having clients who are Spanish-speaking and your familiarity with Spanish medical terms is a big plus.

 

If your main goal during your visit is thinking in terms of relocation, then avoid the more "touristy" things and visit supermarkets, hardware stores, check out some rental housing, sit in the Park and watch the families -- do anything you can to familiarize yourself with the culture and the economy. The culture is different from what you are used to as well as the laws and the way things are done/not done. It's not just that everything is the same except people speak Spanish!

 

Good luck and have fun!

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induna    0

Hello, Iam new to your forum. My husband and I are coming to vacation in CR Sept-Oct. Our kids are grown and we are looking at places that we may potentially retire. With that said, I work in the health field as a registered diagnostic medical ultrasound technologist with 15 years experience (and 10 years exp as a nurse). I work ft in a hospital and 50 percent of my patients speak spanish. I do speak alittle and am currently studying to learn more. With legal requirements met , do you have any idea what the job market is like ultrasound technologists?

I am sure that you would have to be certified here in order to exercise your profession. How this would be accomplished, I have no idea, but I would imagine than some type of examination, at least, would be required in Spanish. The pay would be much lower than you are used to and you would probably find it difficult to find any work outside of the central valley. People who get residency based on a pension (pensionados) cannot work for at least three years. I don't believe that you can have both Pensionado residency and a work permit, if one is even obtainable. I really wouldn't count on being able to work legally here as a part of your retirement plan.

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eleanorcr    0

Have to disagree just a tiny bit, Induna. There are THREE upscale clinics/hospitals in the Liberia area so Central Valley is not the only option. Plus there are quite a few smaller clinics in Guanacaste and labs. (Rich people at the beach, remember? ;) )

 

With a work permit, there's no need for residency -- however, it might pose a problem for the esposo.

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T&VSmith    0

It should not be a problem for the spouse. We have a couple in our community where he has the work visa and his wife is here as a dependant under the visa.

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