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      IMPORTANT - READ BEFORE POSTING to SUPPORT FORUM   01/28/2011

      Posts to this Support Forum are to be related ONLY to one's ARCR membership.   Please post all other types of questions to the appropriate forum.   Only Forums Moderators, Administrators and ARCR Employees ae able to make any replies to this ARCR Support Forum.   Paul M. Forums Moderator ==
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Stoic

New to ARCR, moving to Costa Rica in 2017

112 posts in this topic

We are not talking about "tourism" -- we are talking about "the perpetual tourist." The person who lives and works illegally in Costa Rica without having any residency status and just renews their tourist visa every 90 days (or not) by leaving the country.

 

How do you feel about illegal immigrants where you live? Is this OK with you? Because that's what "perpetual tourists" are in Costa Rica. Do they contribute to the economy? Sure. But it is a miniscule amount.

 

I don't think Costa Rica wants to be too heavy-handed with this issue which is why they are using other avenues such as giving less than 90 days upon return to the country. Plus, just like in the US, the "congress" here (Assemblea) is pretty much totally inept.

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Many years ago the American couple and family that lived next to us, and eventually had 5 children, had PANI 'step in' and made it mandatory for their children to attend the local school. All but one are CR citizens and I think that this makes a difference to enforcing their law.

Costa Rica is not the only country that outlaws home schooling.

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We are not talking about "tourism" -- we are talking about "the perpetual tourist." The person who lives and works illegally in Costa Rica without having any residency status and just renews their tourist visa every 90 days (or not) by leaving the country.

 

You are right Eleanor. But, I am not talking about people working as tourist. That is not an apples to apples comparison. I am talking about the people that for some reason or another don't qualify for residence.

Explain to me why the so called "perpetual tourist" only contributes a minuscule amount to the economy. They probably have to eat and sleep. Are you saying they don't pay for that? Buy clothes, go to the movies, eat out, all the things normal residences do. BTW I live in Costa Rica, and have for the past 11 years.

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Here's the thing, Costa Rica doesn't have to pass a law to prevent people from leaving and re-entering multiple times in sequence. It could be done tomorrow by a single funcionary writing a memo to the immigration police. The law as it is written gives immigration authorities complete and total discretion over who is allowed in as a tourist. No one has right to enter Costa Rica as a tourist. Legal residents, however, do have rights to enter and remain as long as they abide by the law. Those rights cannot be altered by decree, but must go through the legislative and legal process.

 

I have no position on PTs, other than that I couldn't do it. However, they need to be aware that their ability to live here could be taken away for good at any time with little or no warning. That is a simple fact.

Edited by induna

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Well said Induna;

If you choose to be a PT you are at the discretion of immigration personnel's whim. If you choose residency you are at the whim of the law. I could not find the post that was over a year ago but a family of four was to be here for six months (Mum, Dad, and two kids) and they got three different stamps per number of days by the same immigration officer. The two extremes were 15 days and 90 days. There obviously are pros and cons to PT versus residency and each person has to make their choice and abide by what happens in Costa Rica. For us, residency was the way to go but I cannot knock another who chooses differently.

Cheers .... Terry

Edited by T&VSmith

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We are not talking about "tourism" -- we are talking about "the perpetual tourist."

 

Perpetual tourists are included in tourism totals by Costa Rica. Tourism is the largest income producer for this country. Money, and only money, is the reason why Costa Rica Immigration does not stop it.

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Explain to me why the so called "perpetual tourist" only contributes a minuscule amount to the economy. They probably have to eat and sleep. Are you saying they don't pay for that? Buy clothes, go to the movies, eat out, all the things normal residences do. BTW I live in Costa Rica, and have for the past 11 years.

 

Gringo, including legal residents always overestimate how important they are. BTW, residents pay into the CAJA.

T

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If Costa Rica did not what perpetual tourist (made up name not in Costa Rica Law), they could easily pass a law. But they never seem to. Why is that?

 

It most likely was someone in the ICT or in the Asamblea Legslativa that first coined the term as, 'turista perpetuo' (Perpetual Tourist), not the expats. The expats picked up the term afterwards, though.

 

I think it was also published either in La Gaceta or reported in La Nación somewhere and a link to the text containing it, was posted on here by a Forums member several years ago. I searched but could not locate that post.

 

However, searching online for 'turista perpetuo' I found this which to me indicates quite clearly that perpetual tourism is not really acceptable in CR:

 

V.-Que el contenido de dicho Informe Nº DFOE-FEC-12-2004 fue ampliado y aclarado vía consultiva por la Contraloría General de la República mediante el informe FOE-ED-247 del 26 de marzo del 2007, mismo que estableció que los contratos turísticos para todas las actividades turísticas deben tener un plazo de vigencia dado que los incentivos fiscales no deben ser perpetuos y que tal vigencia se equipara al plazo de consolidación del proyecto, el cual debe ser definido técnicamente por el Instituto Costarricense de Turismo en cada contrato, según la variabilidad técnica de cada actividad incentivada y en respeto a los diferentes incentivos establecidos por el artículo 7 de la Ley.

 

at the following URL:

 

http://www.pgrweb.go.cr/scij/Busqueda/Normativa/Normas/nrm_texto_completo.aspx?param1=NRTC&nValor1=1&nValor2=68038&nValor3=80950&strTipM=TC

 

HTH

 

Paul M.

==

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I have no position on PTs, other than that I couldn't do it. However, they need to be aware that their ability to live here could be taken away for good at any time with little or no warning. That is a simple fact.

 

I agree with your observation, Induna. And like you I could not live in CR in such a 'Sword of Damoclese' situation.

 

And not only, as you point out, could one be deported at any time without any warning, that person then has NO LEGAL RECOURSE available to them in CR. Done deal, alas!

 

Regards,

 

Paul M.

==

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Perpetual tourists are included in tourism totals by Costa Rica. Tourism is the largest income producer for this country. Money, and only money, is the reason why Costa Rica Immigration does not stop it.

More than 1,000,000 estadounidenses visited CR last year. Sometime last year I wrote a post in which I looked at the immigration data and attempted to estimate the number of PTs in CR. I basically added up all of the land entries made by estadounidenses during the entire year and divided by 4. In other words I assumed everyone who entered by land was a PT every time they entered. I believe I came up with 15,000 PTs. The post is still on the forum along with links to supporting documentation.

 

IMHO PTs are tolerated because they are basically ignored and don't really matter very much for now. However, one change in the political wind, caused for example by a PT being charged with serial child sexual abuse (using underaged prostitutes), could make perpetual tourism a real issue, which won't be to the advantage of PTs. And given the current law, a simple administrative change limiting all tourists to 180 days per year, for example, could bring it all to an end overnight.

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Posted on FB for Tamarindo. It is all about the money....an entire industry here in Tamarindo devoted to visa runs. There are hundreds of them in Tamarindo.

Upcoming Visa Runs:
February 7th - Departing Tamarindo at 7 am.
February 21st - Departing Tamarindo at 7 am.
Only $45 per person, round trip (including the CR border tax)
Reserve your spot now at 2653-0501, visit us at our downtown office located next to EL Be Club in Tamarindo or send us an email at reservations@tamarindoshuttle.com

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V.-Que el contenido de dicho Informe Nº DFOE-FEC-12-2004 fue ampliado y aclarado vía consultiva por la Contraloría General de la República mediante el informe FOE-ED-247 del 26 de marzo del 2007, mismo que estableció que los contratos turísticos para todas las actividades turísticas deben tener un plazo de vigencia dado que los incentivos fiscales no deben ser perpetuos y que tal vigencia se equipara al plazo de consolidación del proyecto, el cual debe ser definido técnicamente por el Instituto Costarricense de Turismo en cada contrato, según la variabilidad técnica de cada actividad incentivada y en respeto a los diferentes incentivos establecidos por el artículo 7 de la Ley.


I believe this is in reference to taxes.

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caused for example by a PT being charged with serial child sexual abuse (using underaged prostitutes), could make perpetual tourism a real issue, which won't be to the advantage of PTs.

This has already happened to a child molester in Jaco.

Nothing changed.

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This from Mario Zamora Cordero, security minister Oct. 2012: "If a person leaves the country within the visa period and has the correct documentation, immigration agents will not bar them from returning. A perpetual tourist is a foreigner who lives here and renews a tourist visa, usually every 90 days, by traveling outside the country. “If you want to keep leaving and coming back, that's your decision,” he said. His comments were perhaps the most clear ever uttered on the subject by an immigration official."

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