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      IMPORTANT - READ BEFORE POSTING to SUPPORT FORUM   01/28/2011

      Posts to this Support Forum are to be related ONLY to one's ARCR membership. Posts inappropriate to the Support Forum will be removed without comment. Please post all other types of questions to the appropriate Forum. Only Forums Moderators, Administrators and ARCR Employees ae able to make any replies to this ARCR Support Forum. Paul M. Forums Moderator ==
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Stoic

New to ARCR, moving to Costa Rica in 2017

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ReevesTribe    0

That's a touchy situation. Our local school is a joke among the locals because classes are cancelled so much. When they have class, kids are just there an hour or two.

 

No one in the community had any interest in reporting us since we get along with everyone, but I did have a homeschooling neighbor get reported to PANI after they moved to Jaco. They moved back to our beach to send their daughter to school after that (& were required to get her vaccinated).

 

If I felt confident that I could have put them in the school for socialization purposes & not had issues if I wanted to pull them out, I'd have probably done it to give them the experience. However, I was worried that once registered in the system, I'd have difficulty with any type of maneuvering outside the system & didn't want to open that can of worms.

 

Jessica

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Stoic    0

I've yet to read the actual forced-schooling legislation. For me that bridge is still way up the road. If someone has links (to the legislation that is) that could be a helpful thread.

Edited by Stoic

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Bob205    0

Sounds like good reasons, Stoic!

 

As for that 35% of $2500 -- that's the total amount paid if you are working as an employee. Your employer pays part and you pay part. Unfortunately, that calculator doesn't work for "independent worker" as far as I can see. Mostly, you can figure 8-13% on $2500.

 

A Costa Rican friend recently asked me: "What is the number one thing that you love about Costa Rica?" And I could only answer with TWO things: "Number one, my ability to lead a very simple life and two -- the people." And really, three, would be the incredible natural beauty of the country and the great weather.

 

That would be great news if Induna's research comes true! Much easier for you.

I love your reasons!

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ReevesTribe    0

I've looked for the legislation because I've been told so many times that it's illegal to homeschool, but I cannot find anything definitive in the MEP regulations that clearly states that is the case. As far as I can tell, there isn't any mention of allowing homeschooling so it seems it is assumed that it's illegal since it's not specifically stated that it is legal. Almost seems to be a gray area, just like the PT issue!

 

The people I know who were reported to PANI had a number of things going on at the time: #1 They called themselves homeschoolers but were actually unschooling. In this situation, though, they were doing virtually nothing related to education. Their 11-year-old daughter could barely read & she was put in 2nd grade at the local school because of it. In comparison, my twins were 6 months younger than her & entering 5th grade. #2 They hadn't vaccinated their kids. #3 This was a much older gringo man with a young Tica for a wife. #4 They were subsisting on a raw diet & their kids were malnourished & had horrible dental issues. I'm saying the above because it isn't like they were flying under the radar with what they were doing. When they were reported to PANI, there were much bigger issues in the household than the homeschooling.

 

Jessica

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eleanorcr    0

You may or may not get the answers you are looking for. Things are not always as cut and dried as people would like -- refer to Jessica's description of the legality of home schooling. Some of those answers will depend on a lot of things, including what the local atmosphere is where you are living.

 

This is a mistake that many expatriates make: thinking they can easily get a "handle" on how things work (or don't work). It's just not as easy as that. Now, you will probably skim over my comments because they are definitely not what you want to hear (or read) but that's the way it is. Living in Costa Rica is a little like riding those electric bumper cars at the amusement park.

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Many, many people discover that the laws aren't in line with what they want to do. Then they ask how to get around them and what happens if caught.

 

The only correct answer is to know all of the laws and then conform to them. You can't get in any trouble that way.

 

All it takes is one angry or concerned neighbor to make a phone call because they think your children are not going to school or one of you is working. You also need to consider if their education will allow them to get into schools in other countries.

 

Some people live as tourists, but the larger your family is,the harder it will be and the consequences affect more people.

 

T

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Stoic    0

Well, I've had to learn what the laws are here in regards to schooling. And I'll learn what they are in CR as well. I discovered that what MANY people here in TX think is law is often wrong, and I expect that will be as much or more the case in CR. That said, I also know that here in the US you can follow their rules and still get harassed, so I don't expect CR will be much different.

 

eleanor, I haven't glossed over what you say. In fact, yesterday I poked around the site a bit and read posts you made, and I figure you're someone I should hear out on a few things.

 

T&M. Yes, we won't cross any lines.

Edited by Stoic

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eleanorcr    0

"Funny stuff?" Only if you don't live here. This is something that is not unusual. One of the most glaring examples is the so-called perpetual tourism. According to Ryan Piercy, the former manager of ARCR, it is "not legal but not illegal." And from what we have seen, Migracion is trying to put pressure on perpetual tourists in various ways that are not in the category of "if you do this we will arrest you." It's kind of a gray area. Sort of like places in the US where possession of marijuana is illegal, but not in certain amounts.

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Epicatt2    0

For STOIC & others planning a move to Costa Rica:

 

I'd like to offer here a few thoughts ref certain issues involving living in CR which are being discussed in this thread:

 

In a private conversation several years ago Mr. Piercy, then manager of ARCR, observed to me that, in the matter of Residency VS coming to live in CR as a PT, why would Costa Rica have a procedure in place for gaining residency in a legal, provided-for manner if they wanted 'perpetual tourists' to just come and stay in the country making on attempt to gain legal residency?

 

He slso said that he would never live in CR as a PT as, in his opinion, doing so would be disrespectful to Costa Rica, especially since there is an available method available for gaining legal residency. I tend to agree with that stance.

 

And quoting from our Forums Rules & Guidelines: "ARCR does NOT require its members to be here legally nor does it even advise on this matter, but ARCR does not support living in Costa Rica without proper documentation, regardless of whether Cost Rica law seems to permit so or for lack of specificity."

 

So these ideas, I believe, should be things that anyone planning to move to Costa Rica would do well to consider.

 

Regards,

 

Paul M.

==

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CMinCR    0

Paul,

 

It is also important that people considering a move without pursuing residency, know some of the negative impacts it may cause them.

  • Leaving the country before their visa expires, which may be less (or much less) than every 90 days
  • ...and being scrutinized by the border agent as the repeat entry stamps mount up.
  • Inability to get a C.R. driver license
  • Inability to perform inter-bank (SINPE) transfers
  • Carrying the passport (or a copy with last entry page) at all times. You are required to have identification with you. Even kids.
  • Difficulty in opening bank accounts
  • Inability to get CAJA (social security medical insurance)
  • No path to legal work status
  • Being at the mercy of any irritated neighbor...

So basically, being limited to what a tourist might do, with no ability or recourse for many important aspects of normal life.

 

If they still say "so what?", at least it is with knowledge of the many potential downsides.

Edited by CMinCR

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ReevesTribe    0

I know that Country Day Escazu used to offer a paid online option for virtual schooling in the home. It wasn't advertised as homeschooling since the student was in a registered curriculum at a MEP-recognized school, but the schooling did take place at home. I looked it over briefly at one time & found it to be similar to what I used with FLVS (Florida Virtual School). Because we maintained our FL residency, I was able to register my kids for free with FLVS for middle school/high school courses. When I started using this, my attorney's interpretation was that we were no longer homeschooling since the kids had teachers to report to. I don't know what MEP's interpretation would be because we never had any issues at all with what we were doing. What I do know is that MEP is moving towards some virtual instruction - they have two programs that I know of (profe en casa & el maestro en casa) available online to supplement classroom instruction currently. With the CR gov't goal of universal internet access, I cannot see how they wouldn't bring more virtual instruction into the picture in some way, particularly in remote areas where there may be a dearth of good teachers or to provide more consistency in what is being taught countrywide. There are a lot of positives to using this as a tool. I guess the question is that if you are a student at home who is registered in an MEP-accredited virtual program, are you really homeschooling at that point?

Jessica

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