• Announcements

    • Epicatt2

      IMPORTANT - READ BEFORE POSTING to SUPPORT FORUM   01/28/2011

      Posts to this Support Forum are to be related ONLY to one's ARCR membership.   Please post all other types of questions to the appropriate forum.   Only Forums Moderators, Administrators and ARCR Employees ae able to make any replies to this ARCR Support Forum.   Paul M. Forums Moderator ==
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Stoic

New to ARCR, moving to Costa Rica in 2017

112 posts in this topic

What I'm leaning towards is Vinculo app

 

??

Unless your wife is a Costa Rican citizen, your choices are rentista, invernista, or pensionado. Your posts seem to indicate that you are too young to be retired. So unless you have some kind of guaranteed income for life of at least $1000/month, you will have to have $60,000 to deposit in a Costa Rican bank to become a rentista.

 

If you don't apply for residency, life as a PT has its own difficulties and is not encouraged on this forum. Having school age children would be further complicated by living as a tourist.

 

You need to understand the residency types and requirements. They can be found on the ARCR main site, this forum, and other sites. The CR immigration site also has everything (in Spanish). Please get a clear understanding of what you need to do before making any big move.

 

T

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The $60k / $2500-mo option is on the table and in fact it's the most likely path we'll take, but then it's still just temp residency for 3+ years, and possibly has us paying more into CAJA than might make sense for us (maybe, but I need to get firm numbers). Plus it would be a lot of money for us. My father is a CR citizen by birth. I have a US birth certificate, and my parents never registered me even though I did go through preschool in CR, and I'm now far beyond the 25-yr-old cutoff, so I can't go the easy route. It looks to ME like I might be able to go through the Vinculo process. There's a naturalization option for people in my situation, I just have to find out what exactly I need to do. That's something I'll do in the next few months.

 

Yes, PT isn't my preference. There are other places I could go and get residence and eventually citizenship, but we want to plug into community in CR and not be on the fence for years.

Edited by Stoic

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just want to say thanks again to everyone for the insights and things to consider. I just poked around the forums some and there's so much good info. I probably ought to take some notes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Residency por vinculo is when you are married to a Costa Rica citizen. Read here: http://costaricalaw.com/costa-rica-legal-topics/immigration-and-residency/residency-general-information-and-summary/

 

It does look like rentista would be your only possibility. It's difficult to say how much your Caja payment would be -- there's a kind of "formula" but depending on the office where you sign up (this is the office that takes care of the area where you live), they could assign you something different. Nothing here is really cut and dried and the answer is usually "depends" and will often depend on the person sitting across the desk from you.

 

So... now I have a question: What is it about Costa Rica that is appealing to you? What do you expect to do/experience here that you can't do/experience in the US?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a premium calculator that I found on the CCSS website when poking around after someone on Facebook insisted that my husband cannot collect a pension, even though we're paying into it & will have all the cuotas when he's retirement age, because he's an extranjero (not true). Anyways, take a look at this - if it's on the CCSS website, then I think there is a pretty good chance that this is going to be the calculator used to determine your rate or at the very least can give a good ballpark figure. You can extrapolate what you'd pay for just medical (SEM) from this calculator as well.

 

http://www.ccss.sa.cr/calculadora

 

Jessica

Edited by ReevesTribe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Note, that very few banks in the US will write the info that immigration require when applying via the Rentista status...and just showing the deposit of $2500 a month, will not work.

 

Note that the deposit of $60K must be done twice, two years apart, to allow you to apply for Permanent residency

Edited by costaricafinca

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ha, I wouldn't be too keen on paying 35% of $2500/mo for 3 years.

Eleanor, I feel like I have to leave the U.S., for many reasons. And I need my boys to be out. I won't go into any of those reasons here.

SO, given that we're leaving, there are things about CR that appeal to me. 1 is proximity to the U.S. My wife will want to go back to visit or if there's something she needs to attend to. It's close enough and flights are cheap enough that friends and family will come visit us. And we'll have business ties.

I want my sons to be fluent in Spanish, and immersion would be the best way IMO. I also think I could round out my Spanish pretty quickly.
I have lots of family in CR and it would be very nice to get to know them better. Plus other opportunities that would present.
I want my sons to experience cultural differences, and to learn to adapt to changes.
I grew up on Tico food, and love it
The climate, at least in many places
Diversifying ourselves socially and economically.
Perhaps a good path to citizenship.
Lots of other reasons, too.

We're making the move next year.

 

How about you Eleanor? What is it about Costa Rica that you find appealing? What activities/experiences do you enjoy that you did not where you were?

Edited by Stoic

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From what the law and regulation say, Stoic should be eligible for permanent residency if either of his parents are Costa Rican citizens and are still alive. It is not clear whether or not the parent in question needs to be living in CR, but that is a strong possibility. This is the same provision of the law that grants parents of children born in Costa Rica, and thus citizens of Costa Rica, permanent residency. If Stoic is eligible for permanent residency, so are his wife and minor children, or at least they will be as soon as he obtains his residency. I have pasted the the relevant parts of the regulation to the law below. I encourage Stoic to determine whether or not this is a viable route given his circumstances. If it is it is certainly the most straightforward and least expensive.

 

De conformidad con el artículo 78, de la Ley, podrán optar por residencia permanente las siguientes personas extranjeras:

a. La persona extranjera, su cónyuge y sus familiares de primer grado por consanguinidad que hayan gozado de una residencia temporal durante tres años consecutivos.
b. La persona extranjera con parentesco de primer grado por consanguinidad con ciudadano (a) costarricense; se entenderán como tales a los padres, los (as) hijos (as) menores o mayores con discapacidad y los (as) hermanos (as) menores de edad o mayores con discapacidad.

c. A quien la Comisión de Visas Restringidas y Refugio otorgue dicha condición.

Artículo 73.- La persona extranjera que se encuentre contemplada en el inciso a) del artículo anterior, que desee optar por una residencia permanente, deberá cumplir con los requisitos establecidos para cambio de categoría migratoria según se estable en el artículo 282 de este Reglamento.

Artículo 72.-

33

Artículo 74.- El otorgamiento de la residencia permanente implicará que la persona extranjera podrá laborar en cualquier actividad laboral o intelectual remunerada.

Artículo 75.- La persona extranjera que se encuentre contemplada en el inciso B) del artículo 72 de este Reglamento y que deseen optar por esta categoría migratoria, deberá cumplir con los siguientes requisitos:

  1. Formulario de filiación debidamente completo con letra imprenta legible y firmado.

  2. Solicitud de permanencia legal donde se indiquen las calidades del interesado(a),

pretensión, domicilio actual, la cual deberá venir firmada por la persona extranjera en presencia de Funcionario Público o debidamente autenticada por Abogado.
c. Comprobante de pago a favor del Gobierno por cincuenta dólares (US$50,00) o su equivalente en colones al tipo de cambio de referencia del BCCR, correspondiente a la solicitud de permanencia legal bajo la categoría migratoria de residente permanente.
d. Comprobante de pago a favor del Gobierno por concepto de especies fiscales (¢ 125 + ¢ 2,50 por cada folio) de conformidad con la Ley para el Equilibrio Financiero del Sector Público.

  1. Dos fotografías recientes tamaño pasaporte.

  2. Comprobante de huellas emitido por el Ministerio de Seguridad Pública, para personas

mayores de 12 años.
g. Comprobante de inscripción consular. Los requisitos para dicha inscripción serán determinados en el Consulado correspondiente.
h. Certificación de nacimiento de la persona extranjera emitida en el país de origen debidamente legalizada y autenticada o apostillada.

34

i. Certificación de antecedentes penales de la persona extranjera de su país de origen o del lugar donde haya residido legalmente los últimos tres años, debidamente legalizada y autenticada o apostillada. Para esos efectos deberá demostrar adicionalmente la legalidad de su permanencia en ese país mediante copia certificada del documento migratorio obtenido en el plazo indicado.

j. Fotocopia de todas las páginas del pasaporte vigente de la persona extranjera, la cual deberá certificarse ya sea confrontadas con el original ante funcionario de la plataforma de servicios o sede regional, o mediante Notario Público.
k. Certificación emitida por el Registro Civil de Costa Rica, que demuestre el vínculo con la persona costarricense, y con una fecha de emisión no mayor a dos meses al momento de la presentación de la solicitud de permanencia.

l. En el caso de los hermanos mayores de costarricense con discapacidad, deberá demostrarse la misma mediante dictamen médico, y certificación de la curatela emitida por el juez en aquellos casos en que corresponda.

Edited by induna

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like good reasons, Stoic!

 

As for that 35% of $2500 -- that's the total amount paid if you are working as an employee. Your employer pays part and you pay part. Unfortunately, that calculator doesn't work for "independent worker" as far as I can see. Mostly, you can figure 8-13% on $2500.

 

A Costa Rican friend recently asked me: "What is the number one thing that you love about Costa Rica?" And I could only answer with TWO things: "Number one, my ability to lead a very simple life and two -- the people." And really, three, would be the incredible natural beauty of the country and the great weather.

 

That would be great news if Induna's research comes true! Much easier for you.

Edited by eleanorcr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My husband is affiliated as an independent worker. When I put his salary in, we pay very close to the amount that populates in the top box on the total CCSS line (we pay the combined amount of the patrono y trabajador; SEM is medical & IVM is the pension). We don't pay any of those other fees that are listed for other institutions.

 

Jessica

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Slightly off-topic, but I checked out the CAJA calculator and am somewhat confused . . .

 

So Jessica, thanx for explaining that one of those two lines (IVM) represents the pension premium amount that those who are 54 yoa-and-under pay into the CAJA?

 

I did a conversion of my FRS (State of Florida) pension income into colones and the SEM line factors for me a monthly amount at a bit more than double what I'm paying for my ARCR Group rate for CAJA.

 

Of course I signed up for CAJA back in 2009, so my FRS (State of Florida) pension check was back then proportionately less than today. And there have been two CCSS increases in the last couple of years. But even taking my FRS pension amount back to 2009 and considering the two recent increases for CAJA, the calculator's amount is still more than double that for my monthly premium. amount.

 

What am I doing wrong with this calculator, I wonder...? (Prolly nothing . . .)

 

Paul M.

==

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can let me know if you have any questions about telecommuting with a US-based job or business. Your wife won't land a legal job without some type of special skills that would provide a work permit. If she gets any type of offer that doesn't include a discussion about the legality of what's going on, or if you're lead in any way to believe she can just leave every 90 days to renew her stamp & work, you're being mislead big time. This is illegal. If you apply under just about any other type of residency, you'll have temporary residency with restrictions which specifically means she cannot work.

 

I worked as Paul described above during my temporary residency status as a rentista (2006-2012). This enabled us to make the move while I earned a US-based income to support us. I'm a permanent resident now (since 2012) without restrictions so I don't have to worry about any of that :)

 

I moved to CR with 4 kids who were young at the time. Be sure you choose your location based on education needs first & foremost. Beach areas are great - that's where my house is - but there is not an acceptable school available & it's 45 minutes each way to the closest private bilingual school. I didn't consider that when I built my house & it was a mistake. I opted for homeschooling (another discussion entirely) until my oldest started his junior year in high school in 2013, at which time we moved our base of operations back to FL & I'm now back & forth between the two areas while getting the kids through high school.

 

Jessica

 

Thank you very much. Yes, remote work, not-school, that's us. I look forward to your input over the next few months.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jessica -- I am interested to know how you got away with home-schooling your kids since it's illegal? I have a friend who sends her kid to public school but does an hour a day of "homeschooling" to fill in what she doesn't get in public school. Can you just register your kids and then have them not show up very much? Or? She figures the main thing with the public school is learning Spanish, socialization and learning Costa Rican culture and history. Anything else that is lacking can be provided at home.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My kids were never registered at the local "daycare." I won't refer to it as a school - it's an insult to a real school to refer to that place as a school. Even though we were legal residents with regular immigration appointments, no one ever asked asked at any time what our schooling arrangements were. Had they showed any interest, I had already talked to our attorney about registering my home school program as a recognized school with MEP. I was a licensed teacher with an advanced degree & there were steps I could take to receive official recognition if I ever needed it. I never did. If I return to CR with my younger kids (the oldest is now in college) & decide to continue homeschooling, I won't have an issue because my kids are past the age of compulsory education in Costa Rica at this point.

 

Jessica

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Jessica. That is very interesting and, of course, sounds like everything has worked out for you. I have forwarded your post to my friend -- she also has an advanced teaching degree so the registration with MEP is certainly an option. The problem is -- she is married to a Costa Rican and we live in a small town so it would kind of be an "insult" to the local people and to his family so requires some thought. Anyway -- thanks for the info.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Remove formatting

  Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0