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Has anyone else heard of the supposed 4th of July protest to be held by some residents of St. Teresa? They are fed up with the condition of the road leading to Mal Pais and St. Teresa, and rightfully so. Supposedly they are going to block access to the ferry as well as the road leading into Cobano. This could occur as early as the first of July. My hubby and I were advised to make sure our car has gas and that we have enough food since trucks won't be able to make it onto the peninsula. I had to chuckle a little at that advise. It reminded me of living in the States and at the first hint of snow, there would be a run on the grocery stores and milk and bread would fly off the shelves.

 

Well, tomorrow we actually have a meeting with 2 people from S.T., so I'll ask them what's cooking.

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I still think this is some kind of silly gringo idea. Probably the protests will be held on Guanacaste Annexation Day, July 25th, because this is when Costa Ricans will protest. There will be protests of various kinds all over Guanacaste due to visiting politicians and government ministers. I can just see 5 or 10 gringos trying to block the ferry. How much attention would that get? But if President Solis is going to the southern Nicoya Peninsula for July 25, then that might have an impact.

 

A better gringo idea would be if a small group of business owners from the southern Nicoya Peninsula, mostly Costa Rican, get together and make an appointment with President Solis and the minister of MOPT and the minster of Tourism and bring videos and power point presentations with financial ramifications and make their case, emphasizing how it affects COSTA RICANS.

 

Still -- I'd love to know the result of your meeting -- hope you will report back!

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One thing I didn't mention is that a representative from MOPT is supposed to meet with the community some time this week, and my understanding is that if things don't go well, the protest will happen. My hubby asked exactly how would they manage to block the road, and the reply was that they would chainsaw a tree and let it block the road. Well, conjectures are fine. We'll see what happens, and if our guys tomorrow know anything, I'll report back!

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Based upon my limited legal experience, I think cutting a tree down to block the road will result in arrests and fines. But good luck. I think MOPT has its hands full with the Caribbean side of the country right now.

 

Safer to just park your car in the road, so it can be moved before things get out of hand. It's still not a good idea and will accomplish nothing.

 

Also, how long do you think local traffic will put up with some Gringos protesting?

 

T

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In my experience, it takes about 20 minutes to cut up a tree -- or about 10 guys to push a big tree out of the way. No one is going to just stand around looking at a tree in the road.

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Remember that to cut down a tree in Costa Rica requires a permit. I also think a poor time to do this with the flooding situation in other parts of the country. At least you have a road while many in flooded areas don't.

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Those are good points, Carol. Especially the one about the flooding in other areas. Maybe not the best time to try to get attention on the road problems in the southern Nicoya Peninsula.

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The road from St. Teresa to Cobano was closed today, so our meeting was cancelled. Hopefully it will happen tomorrow. I don't know why it was closed. It could be due to the storm we had last night and the power being out, but that's just a guess on my part.

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La Nación only last week instituted a 'pay gate' on the newspaper.

 

I wonder how long that will last.

 

Asi es tiquicia . . .

 

Paul M.

==

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Sorry about that. You're supposed to be able to read 15 articles a month for free. I get the paper delivered, so I get access to the website included.

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Does anyone know whether La Nación is blocking all issues or do they become free after a certain span of time has elspsed (days?, weeks?) and then can we access those older issues of La N without a subscription?

 

Not sure about the 15 issues free per month thingy and I haven't had time to snoop this out for myself.

 

Cheers!

 

Paul M.

==

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