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newman

possible assistance - Costa Rica dying

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As Costa Rica is dying, maybe it's time that the ARCR started lobbying the government (after all, isn't that one reason we pay yearly dues?) to start once again attracting retirees? When I came here thirteen years ago, I got my permanent residency in a matter of 2/3 months!! Why is it now taking 3 years?? Costa Rica needs companies coming here and investments from outside the country!! Why can't the ARCR lobby for a return to the old days when an foreign resident could bring in a car duty free from outside the country every 3/4 years!! Wouldn't a loosening of the immigration laws and caer import duties help Costa Rica return their governments budget to the black?? Wouldn't this also help the ARCR as a business?? Let's get this discussion going!!

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As far as I can see Newman, what you've written is something that concerned ARCR members such as yourself should take up directly with ARCR personnel at Casa Canadá.

 

We must remember though that Costa Rica as a sovergn entity may enact whatever rules she chooses.

 

We should also keep in mind that we residentes are essentaily guests in Costa Rica and therefore should act accordingly.

 

Regards,

 

Paul M.

==

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I always act correctly, as I have ALWAYS understood that I am guest here in Costa Rica - the fact is that Costa Rica is dying - they have driven away industry with their high electricity rates, bureaucratic obstacles to anyone wanting to do business here (thereby not bringing Jobs and prosperity to their country) - just the other day an article in La Nación told of a survey where around 60% of Ticos fear for their Jobs and livelihoods! If this country continues down this path, all of us who remain here shall reap the whirlwind, along with all of the Ticos!! As guests in this country, shouldn't we all want it to succede?? I have always conducted myself in a manner conducive to the respect that this country deserves of me, and shall continue to do so as long as I am here!!!!

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This is typical of the Gringo mindset. The total north American population residing in Costa Rica has a negligible impact on the economy. You could double, triple, or even quadruple (what a terrible thought) the number of Gringos, but Gringos can't "fix" Costa Rica.

 

ARCR is a business that sells services to assist with relocating to Costa Rica. They have no significant power or obligation to lobby the government.

 

If the economy of Costa Rica reaches an economic crisis, it will require the action of the other nations to either restructure or forgive debts, or assist in some other significant way. ARCR and/or 10,000 more U.S. and Canadian citizens and their cars won't be able to do it.

 

Greece is an example of a crisis. Up to this point, I haven't seen any significant international concern over the economy of Costa Rica.

 

T

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I never understand why people think we need to "CHANGE" Costa Rica. It is their country. As Paul says we are guests. As I often say if we don't like it here we can leave. I personally am very happy & satisfied with my life here ( almost 5 years).

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I don't understand people who think we add any value to life in Costa Rica. We can certainly impact the lives of our neighbors and communities (in positive and negative ways), but it is arrogant to think we have an impact on the nation.

 

T

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When Ryan Piercy was in charge, I signed (along with other ARCR members), a suit against the government to grandfather residents in pursuit of a bill in the assemblea!! I don't believe that it was ever necesssary to file the suit, as the legislation was never written contrary to foreign residents interests! Additionally, where is anyone trying to change Costa Rica? Costa Rica needs all the help it can get!! Don't any of you think that attracting more retirees here would be viewed favorably by foreign countries lookong for a places to invest? During the last year all I've heard is that retirees are leaving here by the droves, and those retirees that are diing off are not being replaced!!! I've been here almost 113 years, and only 2 or 3 foreigners have moved into the town where I live - no where near enought to replace those that have moved out or died!! By the way - we are paying ARCR our dues to lobby for our interests and go to bat for us when necessary!! Let's get Ryan Piercy back running this organization!!!

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I don't think Costa Rica cares much at all about attracting more retirees. Heck, it has been proven on this forum time & time again that most retirees are looking to minimize their expenses & live on less than they could in the US for the same lifestyle. Those same retirees are likely contributing to the burden carried by the CAJA - I mean, in reality, how many retirees are actually paying monthly fees that correlate to the money spent on their care? Those types really aren't impacting the CR economy in any significant way, IMO. Sure, drawing in more legal residents to pay into CAJA might ease the CAJA financial issues in some tiny way, but I truly believe it is going to take the restructuring of that bureaucracy to enact any significant easing of its problems. Anyways, my opinion is that CR wants - no, NEEDS - US big bucks in the mix. So, I think they want to attract US corporations/business interests. Think of how many retirees on a fixed income at the $1000 minimum per month it would take to equal one large US corp's impact.

 

Jessica

 

*edited to add that the last few sentences were written in response to the one immediately above mine about CR sending the committee to the US last week to drum up interest.

Edited by ReevesTribe

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Costa Rica needs every dollar, every dollar counts that flows into Costa Rica, no matter who it came from. Costa Rica needs not only tourist dollars but gringo dollars, pensionado dollars and most important, business dollars.

 

Here is what Mr. Solis just said at the U.S.A. business summit:

 

Despite stability, growth and focus on education, poverty is still a big problem: Solis said that 21 percent of the country’s population of 5 million is considered poor or extremely poor. “Structural poverty has been a problem for generations,” Solis said. “It’s an economic problem, a social problem, and also a moral problem.”

Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/business/article21017490.html#storylink=cpy

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I don't think Costa Rica cares much at all about attracting more retirees. Heck, it has been proven on this forum time & time again that most retirees are looking to minimize their expenses & live on less than they could in the US for the same lifestyle. Those same retirees are likely contributing to the burden carried by the CAJA - I mean, in reality, how many retirees are actually paying monthly fees that correlate to the money spent on their care? Those types really aren't impacting the CR economy in any significant way, IMO. Sure, drawing in more legal residents to pay into CAJA might ease the CAJA financial issues in some tiny way, but I truly believe it is going to take the restructuring of that bureaucracy to enact any significant easing of its problems. Anyways, my opinion is that CR wants - no, NEEDS - US big bucks in the mix. So, I think they want to attract US corporations/business interests. Think of how many retirees on a fixed income at the $1000 minimum per month it would take to equal one large US corp's impact.

 

Jessica

 

*edited to add that the last few sentences were written in response to the one immediately above mine about CR sending the committee to the US last week to drum up interest.

You are so right on how much of a $1000 Expat Pension is of real benefit to Ticoland?? IMO="NADA".

Edited by tibas9

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Anyways, my opinion is that CR wants - no, NEEDS - US big bucks in the mix. So, I think they want to attract US corporations/business interests. Think of how many retirees on a fixed income at the $1000 minimum per month it would take to equal one large US corp's impact.

 

Jessica

 

 

 

Yes. Government agents meet with other government(s) to attract industry and trade. They may also be seeking low interest loans or aid dollars. These efforts are not limited to North America. Costa Rica also has ties to other large economies. Just look at the investments that have come from China.

 

They are not going to other countries and asking them to send them their retirees. They are trying to grow the economy.

 

Every dollar counts when you have to pay the rent. A few extra dollars will not solve government deficits.

 

T

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you are forgetting that the present perception in the world is that Costa Rica, due to it's laws and policies and attitudes are telling the world that they do not want outside investment, or people coming here to help their economy!! Sure, they have a link to Communist China - don't for get that when the Chinese come in, they conquer simply by being in a location, because they have a huge population - no one can conquer China - if they try, they just become Chinese in the end!!

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The Tico Times had an article today about CR being the most expensive country in the region. I really think the high prices & impact on tourism is something that needs to be better studied with REAL facts. We're still at that point where CR touts those great tourist numbers when a good portion of those numbers are perpetual tourists or Nicaraguans crossing the border. I've had visitors from the US every year that I've had my home in Costa Rica & for the last several years, I've had visitors each year who have indicated that they won't likely come back for another visit because of how much more expensive it was than they expected. I'm back & forth between CR & FL a lot & I hear it on every flight back to FL. I guess CR still has that 3rd world/cheap reputation & tourists are literally in shock when they're paying 1st world prices at sodas in tourist areas or lacking basic services (like water) during high (dry) season. Of course, infrastructure improvements will require more money & less corruption & CR doesn't seem to have a regular supply of either of those things right now.

 

I also think it is difficult for CR to market itself as a great place to invest/do business when they really haven't removed the barriers to doing business easily in CR. I wonder what the effect would be if CR offered nice incentives to businesses currently in CR, doing business right now, versus trying to grab the attention of new ones that may not even have CR on their radar?

 

Jessica

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