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Jamieanne

Has anyone here installed and/or lived with a "natural" pool?

44 posts in this topic

Plants standing for a long period in water is different when their root system is completely submerged are completely different. Even trying somewhere to purchase water lilies is not that easy. I grow many different species of 'elephant ear' type-plants but all reqire descent drainage. One of the easiest to find is the Peace lily 'Spathiphyllum friedrichsthalii' but again, they may rot. Look how quickly a banana plant will succumb when waterlogged ground whenever their is serious flooding over near Limón.

 

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Yeah, you definitely need a plant that actually lives in water and not just one that tolerates wet conditions.

 

There are lots of varieties that would be suitable but finding them and acquiring them is a whole 'nother thang. Chances are, you won't find ANY for sale and will just have to search them out.

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One of my favourite plants is Butterfly ginger, 'Hedychium coronarium' often seen growing along river banks and moist ditches here, usually during the rainy season. One that offers a lovely fragrance.

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I would definataly try to find as many plants that are endemic and natural to the area as possible. That's what I have done with my pond along with "bought" Lilly pads. I also built a simple bio-filter that runs in conjunction with the pump. I've basicaly always built a pond in just about every house that I've lived in and when we move to CR I plan on the same, so any info on where to get beautiful water lillys and other plants and fish would be of great interest to me.

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We had ponds in Canada with plants and Koi and we only found one sources of these, in Playa del Coco but that no longer an option. One water plant that may be easier to find, is Water hyacinth, but it very quickly takes over any pond, so I would not recommend it.

We have an old satellite dish with a constant flowing water source for the many birds in our garden and there is no problem with mosquitoes or the toads using it, but there is also a deep water dish (water basin) for the dogs to drink out of and it must be cleaned out every day with bleach since the toads do use it 1ht8wz.gif and leave a 'mess' behind. However, they, the toads, do live and cause no problems under our other, constantly moving water fountain.

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My pond has three different types of water Lilly's, white, pink (Colorado) and a purple tropical. Would love to be able to find a source for a them in CR

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I had a water "drip" in one of the houses where I lived and it attracted an amazing amount of birds. They could hear the "drip" from a ways off and would come and enjoy the pool below the drip. Later, they would bring their offspring. It was fantastic.

 

And now I have to ask myself: Self, why don't you have a water drip where you are living now? Get busy!

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Riverjop: Maybe turn your thinking in a different direction. Instead of "where can I buy water lilies?" -- how about "where can I GET water lilies?" For most things like that, you don't just bop down to the corner store but you have to ask and seek and look and find. Mostly, you will have to find the water lilies and then uproot them and take them back to your new pond. And... you might be pleasantly surprised to find some species of water plants that you didn't know about. It's all about getting to know the country as well as how things are done.

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I've had numerous koi ponds, and I built one for my SIL in Tres Rios. If you build the pond a few inches above the surrounding area you won't have muddy water getting into the pond, just the rain to refresh the pond. For something as small as a pond/pool, water hyacinth is not invasive. You can fish out a few pieces once a week or so and it will be fine. Water hyacinth does a very good job of filtering the water, and if you have fish, the roots are good for nibbling on and protecting baby fish.

 

If you don't have fish food going into the pond then you don't need a bio filter. Many ponds without excessive fish, like mine, do just fine without a biofilter other than what's already provided on the surfaces of the pond and plants. Just don't increase the food/waste load all at once-you need to give the biofilter a few weeks to grow to adapt to the higher food/waste load. You can buy a water test kit for $10-15 that will tell you how your bio filter is doing.

 

If everything is in good balance, and the pond isn't seeing direct sun all day it should stay clear. If it doesn't, increase the number of plants and surface coverage.

Edited by ciclista

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elenorcr - we are in the southern zone, CR! it is on our land and one of the features we were looking at before we purchased. all waterfalls in CR, as you know, are public property. we purchased several acres around it and own several feet of river. I'll find a pic and post, but it is about a 30 foot drop and measures and 25 x 25 feet. This is certainly "natural" that comes with down-trees in the wet months (now) but the forest does a great job with some workers of keeping it clean. The water moves too fast for plants in the pool, but the fresh water shrimp will remind you they are present when you stand still too long!

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Ciclista or anyone else, where have you seen water hyacinth here, either for sale or growing wild? I have only seen it in Turrialba.

Our landlord has 'split the cost' with us to finish a swimming pool that has sat empty for years and I would like to add some water hyacinth, as I do like it and since you feel it won't take it over...

With the work done on it, it no longer leaks... :rolleyes: ...and the top has been finished off and stairs added, so a great improvement. Now we must do some transplanting of plants presently planted elsewhere in our yard.

Fingers crossed!

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