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Jamieanne

Has anyone here installed and/or lived with a "natural" pool?

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Jamieanne    0

I am interested in building a natural pool - for the benefit of the environment, low energy consumption, and enjoyment of swimming in clean water not contaminated with chemicals. I read many many reviews about how wonderful they are, but haven't heard much about them here in Costa Rica...Does anyone out there have any experience with such pools?

 

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newman    0

without running wáter, (and even with running wáter) one would not want a natural pool in the tropics (Costa Rica) Pool is the way to go - the chemicals in hte pool won't harm you (however I'm sure I'd get some arguments on that) - if you want to see what would happen with a natural pool, find a swimming pool that hasn't been treated with chlorine!

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tibas9    0

Question, what exactly is a "Natural Pool"?? If it is what I am thinking all you need is a shovel in order to dig a big hole and wait for the "agua cerros".

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eleanorcr    0

I would guess that it's kind of like a fish pond: dig a big hole, line it with plastic and either divert an existing stream of water or "create" one to have a "natural pool." I would think that without some kind of filtration and chemical treatment, you would need running water to keep it clean. But I've never seen one, so I am only guessing.

Edited by eleanorcr

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If the others are correct, that this "natural" pool would be something through which flows a natural source of water, then I'd advise you to have that water source tested before you commit to construction. Not all the free-flowing streams and rivers in Costa Rica are clean and pure, and some that originate on Volcan Poas (and maybe from sources near other volcanos, too) are very acidic.

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DanaJ    0

Actually a natural pool is a regular pool but without the water treatments. And that means that you would have to change the water frequently here or it will turn green on you. Could be quite expensive too, unless you have your own well.

My BnLaw looked into a salt water pool, but for some reason decided against it. I'll have to ask him why.

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Jamieanne    0

Actually, a natural pool is one that is built similarly to a traditional pool but is cleaned and filtered with aquatic plants. These types of pools have been built extensively in Europe and are increasing in popularity around the globe - even for public use. They can be in the shape of a traditional pool or like a natural pond. The plants compete for nutrients with algae and the plants, if done right, win - so no green scum. They are aerated with a simple filter, and a skimmer takes junk off the surface. There are many resources - here is one if you are interested: http://www.inspirationgreen.com/natural-pools-swimming-ponds.html

 

oh - about changing water - a natural pool never needs draining, where a chlorinated pools gets dumped periodically. The maintenance involved is mainly gardening. I'm thinking a cistern that collects roof water in the green season for keeping levels at the right level would be the way to go.

Edited by Jamieanne

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Problem being, it is very difficult to obtain the specific plants here, in a very tropical and therefor very wet conditions, which is imperative to keep it clean...

We purchased books, checked out specific sources,and looked into doing this years ago...and I will say that some do look beautiful.

During the rainy season here, if your pool is at ground level (which we did uQM2YCD.gif) it will look like chocolate milk and be unusable within the day due to the rain run-off, especially if your ground is on the downside of bven the slightest slope. Plus this natural pool will allow encourage frogs, toads, snakes and other undesirables into the water.

Even the water in hot-springs harbor some unwanted elements, like the one recently in La Fortuna.

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Savannahjo    0

we have a waterfall that drops into a very nice "natural pool" and love it! our friends with traditional pools have to deal with things I don't want to deal with. growing up in Florida, we looked for such a property. funny thing, our friends with non-natural pools come to play in ours!!

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eleanorcr    0

Savannahjo: Can you give us more details about your pool? Maybe even a photo? It sounds great. What area of the country do you live in? How big is your pool? What plants do you use in it? Does it have running water or is it self-contained?

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There was an article, last year 'online', regarding the damage caused by the 'runoff' from swimming and Tilapia pools during the rainy season around Neuvo Arenal, that were said to be causing the mudslides along the roadway in that area.

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eleanorcr    0

Hmmmm. My take on the landslides is that they are the result of natural erosion and not damage caused from swimming pools and fish ponds. Most of the landslides have been on the road around Lake Arenal where people have cut down the plants that lived on the hillsides and planted grass. The deep roots of the shrubs and small trees that were there provided "anchors" for the soil that now aren't there. Once the soil becomes so soaked that it can't absorb any more, it is prime for landslides. Every time I am in that area, I shake my head at the lack of foresight and understanding of people who do that. Sadly, everyone "pays" when a landslide occurs - including bystanders who lose their lives.

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Riverjop    0

Basicaly a "natural" pool is a pond!

You would need a steady current of incoming water and an equal amount of water discharging.

I'm sure most people have swam in a river or a pond of some sort. You just need movement to keep the water clear and clean, and water plants can help. Just be careful of what plants you use as some are highly invasive (like water hyacinth)

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_hyacinth#Invasive_species

Savannahjo's waterfall would be a perfect example

Jamieanne here is a link

http://preventdisease.com/news/14/062614_The-Most-Natural-Organic-Pool-You-Can-Build-Yourself.shtml

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Jamieanne    0

Basicaly a "natural" pool is a pond!

You would need a steady current of incoming water and an equal amount of water discharging.

I'm sure most people have swam in a river or a pond of some sort. You just need movement to keep the water clear and clean, and water plants can help. Just be careful of what plants you use as some are highly invasive (like water hyacinth)

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_hyacinth#Invasive_species

Savannahjo's waterfall would be a perfect example

Jamieanne here is a link

http://preventdisease.com/news/14/062614_The-Most-Natural-Organic-Pool-You-Can-Build-Yourself.shtml

Yes...ingoing and outgoing in a relatively closed system - circulating from the regeneration portion of the pool to the swimming portion, being 'topped off' by stored rainwater as needed. It would be aerated by a simple pump. I need to find out about aquatic plants that do well here and are not invasive...I think it was noted above that they are difficult to find? But that's kind of counter intuitive given that we are in rainforest/waterfall country with plenty of water friendly plants. No???

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eleanorcr    0

With a little research, you can easily find out which water plants grow in Costa Rica. Actually getting them is the trick and this will depend on where you live. You might need to travel somewhere to find water-based plants and then get permission to harvest them and then keep them alive until they get back to your natural pool.

 

For instance, the canals around Tortuguero would be one possible source, but this is not really a day trip from anywhere. Water lilies, of course, and some aquatic plants of the Araceae family (some of them look kind of like elephant ears...)

 

Obviously, best to check around the area where you live.

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