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lucybelle

Two months back in the homeland

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Lol !

What will a "box" of el "Grosso" set a person back, more or less than $2?

 

Yes.

 

And it's not "el Grosso". It's just "Grosso" which is to say, "grosso!".

Edited by David C. Murray

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Gayle - Paul

I am reminded of when we lived in San Francisco in the early 70s and dined occasionally at some of the better restaurants (Blue Boar-Grotto 9-Scomas-Ben Johnsons). Friday and Saturdays nights always required a two hour wait for a table and of course you waited at the bar. During a conversation with a Wine Stewart he noted that the patrons who had waited at the bar could not tell the difference between a $100 bottle or a $5 bottle of wine. After 2 or 3 Martinis or Scotches, their taste buds were dead .

 

In my youth, when the streets were still lit by gaslight, we'd drive across the Potomac into DC and buy a six-pack of Budweiser (about $3 even then) and a case of Senator Club (24 for $2.05 plus deposit). After downing the Buds, the Senator Club tasted just fine, otherwise . . . grosso.

Edited by David C. Murray

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Wine tasting is a very individual, personal preference thing. My wife and I live within two hours drive from virtually all of the major wine appellations in California, e.g. Sonoma County, Napa, Paso Robles, Santa Cruz Mountains, etc.. We taste a lot of wine and have nearly 300 bottles properly stored. Some cost $12, a few sell now for over $300 (we buy them young for $20-$30), and everything in between. When you can learn to recognize and describe the various aromas and tastes in wine, then you can compare wines based on your observations, and other people can get an idea whether or not they'd like a wine that you do, based on their own taste and smell preferences.

 

Generally speaking, if you like wine that's straightforward, not subtle, full of fresh flavor, with little, or no oak influence, you'll probably find many wines that you like for under $20, and even under $10. If you prefer more subtle flavors with multiple layers of flavors and smells, and a pleasant aftertaste that changes a little in the first few seconds and then lingers pleasantly, then you'll usually need to consider wines above $25. Wines from South America (Chile and Argentina), New Zealand, Australia, and the Pacific Northwest US have some nice options at lower prices. If you can't tell the difference between a wine that costs $10 vs $50, then buy the cheaper one and enjoy it. Anyone who tells you there aren't any good wines available for under $15 is either a wine snob, or they haven't tasted enough wines (objectively) to know the truth.

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ciclista, try "Lady in Red," available at Costco, if you haven't. Not expensive, but a bottling from the premier vintner Kestrel in WA State. Around $10. Boy, do we miss it here. Nothing in that price range from Chile, Argentina, or South Africa can touch it. (in my HUMBLE opinion!)

 

salud!

Gayle

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Well, you good people are just a wealth of information. Gayle, I shall think of you now as the Lady in Red. Wait ... I think I hear your theme song. And I'm definitely going to look into this whole "wine aerator" deal the next time I have a mule coming down.

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The owner of the brand planted vines in long straight rows, and in a lousy grape growing region hence cheaper land.

 

The grapes are picked mechanically and along with them go the bugs, bits of stems and other not nice things.

 

I used to get some once in a while but now I stick to $7 (in the states) Jacob's Creek from Australia. With a screw cap. Good stuff at the price point.

 

Here's a link about the 2 buck Chuck, and below is an excerpt. http://www.snopes.com/business/market/shawwine.asp

 

A few things to keep in mind about his vineyards: one is that they are located in what is known as the Central Valley in the California wine world which is notoriously flat and quite hot producing massive yields of overripe grapes. The other thing is that Fred Franzia is no dummy — he planted those vineyards in such a way as the rows run north-south, giving the vines maximum sun exposure and he made the rows as long as he possibly could, minimizing the number of turns his tractors would need to make. And third, these aren't hand-picked vineyards ... they are all machine harvested. And that means these large tractors with huge claws go down the rows of vineyards grabbing the grapes and depositing them in its huge receptacle. And it not only grabs ripe grapes, but unripe and down right rotten ones as well and throws them all together. Add to that leaves, stems and any rodents, birds, or insects that may have made those vines their home — they all get thrown into the bin as well. And guess what? You think there's going to be any sorting when that truck arrives at the winery (or should I say processing facility)? Nope. Everything, and I do mean everything (including all those unripe grapes, rotten grapes, leaves, stems, birds, rodents, and insects) gets tossed into the crusher and transferred to large tanks to ferment. So think about all the animal blood and parts that may have made their way into your wine next time you crack open that bottle of Two Buck Chuck! Hardly even seems worth the $2 does it?

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I had an absolutely fabulous white wine from Peru! We had it at the nice Italian restaurant in Puerto Viejo. That was by far some of the best wine I've ever had. I think it was maybe $30 for the bottle (so probably in a store it'll go for $15) I love crisp, dry white wines like Sauvignon Blanc, they didn't have it so they recommended this Peruvian wine. It was fabulous. Wish we wrote down the name!!

 

I'm also a huge fan of all screw top wines. Easy access is my friend :P

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The owner of the brand planted vines in long straight rows, and in a lousy grape growing region hence cheaper land.

 

The grapes are picked mechanically and along with them go the bugs, bits of stems and other not nice things.

 

I used to get some once in a while but now I stick to $7 (in the states) Jacob's Creek from Australia. With a screw cap. Good stuff at the price point.

 

Here's a link about the 2 buck Chuck, and below is an excerpt. http://www.snopes.com/business/market/shawwine.asp

 

A few things to keep in mind about his vineyards: one is that they are located in what is known as the Central Valley in the California wine world which is notoriously flat and quite hot producing massive yields of overripe grapes. The other thing is that Fred Franzia is no dummy — he planted those vineyards in such a way as the rows run north-south, giving the vines maximum sun exposure and he made the rows as long as he possibly could, minimizing the number of turns his tractors would need to make. And third, these aren't hand-picked vineyards ... they are all machine harvested. And that means these large tractors with huge claws go down the rows of vineyards grabbing the grapes and depositing them in its huge receptacle. And it not only grabs ripe grapes, but unripe and down right rotten ones as well and throws them all together. Add to that leaves, stems and any rodents, birds, or insects that may have made those vines their home — they all get thrown into the bin as well. And guess what? You think there's going to be any sorting when that truck arrives at the winery (or should I say processing facility)? Nope. Everything, and I do mean everything (including all those unripe grapes, rotten grapes, leaves, stems, birds, rodents, and insects) gets tossed into the crusher and transferred to large tanks to ferment. So think about all the animal blood and parts that may have made their way into your wine next time you crack open that bottle of Two Buck Chuck! Hardly even seems worth the $2 does it?

 

I'd suggest reading all of the copy at the Sopes.com link that FredS provided.

 

Snopes.com offers some clarification for both the text and the green highlighted text (ithat's quoted above in this post) both of which contan some misleading information at that llnked page on their site, which may be useful to read.

 

Just FWIW . . .

 

Paul M.

==

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