Jump to content

Recommended Posts

the thing is that someday it is possible that some hotshot lawyer in the DOS or DOJ decides to make a name for himself by "making examples" This, I believe, in my opinión was the jist of the ladies suit about 3 years ago to the SALA IV concerning the naturalization applications statement that one is required to renounce all previous citizenships, which is not required when applying for naturalization through marriage. By the way she lost her case.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It really doesn't matter what you do or don't do. Remember that all governments are constituted by flawed human beings. There is no rule, no law, no Constitution, no right, no citizenship that cannot be rescinded/revised or new laws/rules created that remove or reverse any now existing law - anywhere in the world. Any such law or rule created by man can be reversed. There are no inalienable rights, save those laws of physics.

 

In the name of religion, race or political ideology, individuals and whole populations have been murdered, persecuted, expelled and imprisoned even where they had lived peaceably and productively for scored of years, even centuries. It continues today.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A US Citizen can legally travel to Cuba. on his/her TICO Passport without getting advance permission from the good old USA.

 

Why? The US DOS has no jurisdiction over the issuance of TICO Passports.

This only applies if you are also a citizen of another country and have a passport of that country, such as in your case, and you have CR citizenship.

But if you really want to make sure US law is not applied to you, you must renounce your US citizenship, and any benefits you get from that too. This might include your federal retirement benefits. Is it worth it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone requesting Costa Rican citizenship signs the application that states that you are required to renounce all previous citizenships! (this requirement does not exist for an application due to marriage). Now then if you should perhaps find yourself in a situation where, for any reason, the US DOS finds out that you signed this, you could be stripped of your US citizenship (a law still exists on the books where this could happen - US Code of Federal Regulations) - at that instant, if Costa Rica finds out that you have not renounced "all previous citizenships, you could lose your Costa Rica citizenship, and possibly be prosecuted for perjury under Costa Rican law! At that point, you are a "man without a country". I am not a lawyer and am not giving legal advice!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Newman, it is highly unlikely for the US DOS to take such extreme measures. Ironically enough, the US needs its continually expanding tax base to finance its huge deficits so surely it wouldn't want to start a trend in the opposite direction. Thus even if a US citizen wishes to renounce his/her citizenship, s/he now must do so at a US Embassy abroad in the presence of an Embassy official who, at that initial interface will tell the person to go home and consider what they are asking to do and come back another day if they are still so inclined. Then the person, if s/he returns and requests to renounce again, must fill out a declaration form to that effect. If renouncement is granted the person is stilll not done with the US because the IRS will continue to assess taxes on the person for another ten years.

 

And ref your assertion that signing a renouncement of US citizenship in the CR application for naturalization will cause a person to lose their US citizenship, that is not true. The US does not recognize that as a bona fide request for renouncement. I have even read posts on this and another CR discussion group by persons who reported that they actually lined through the langage on the form that says that they agree to renounce their US citizenship yet the CR document was acepted but they were naturalized anyway. And I have never seen any reportage anywhere that indicated CR's annulment of someone's naturalization because they did not agree to renounce their patrimonial citizenship. Do you have a specific example to cite?

 

Also remember that there was thet famous incident where CR citizen, Franklin Chang Díaz was about to be accepted for the US' NASA space program as an astronaut when Costa Rica suddenly realized that to do so he would have to become a US citizen and that CR did not allow its citizens to have dual citizenship. Hastily a law was drafted permitting Díaz to acquire a second (US) citizenship so he could become a US astronaut, which CR deemed a big feather in its cap, so to speak. Since then CR no longer insists that applicants for CR naturalizaton must agree to renounce their citizenship even though the language still persists on the naturalization document.

 

Lastly though, there is a stipulation by the US that if a person serves in the armed forces of a country that is condidered an enemy of the US that that person might lose his/her US pensions and similar US benefits but it does not necessarily strip them of their US citizenship.

 

Regards,

 

Paul M.

==

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

signing the application for naturalization as a Costa Rican only means that one is required to renounce all previous citizenships on their own volition. I have no examples to cite, however being VERY familiar with government procedures, nothing would surprise me. Also, I've been playing the angles my whole life, and two rules exist 1) make absolutely sure that you have EVERYTHING covered (and even then you may not) 2)Never forget rule 1. Also never forget that as long as a law on the books, you can be prosecuted for it, even if it hasn't been enforced for years! As for the renunciation of all previous citizenships, if you don't do it, you could be prosecuted for perjury under Csota Rican law. All it would take is someone wanting "revenge" on you, I'm not a lawyer and am not giving legal advice!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

signing the application for naturalization as a Costa Rican only means that one is required to renounce all previous citizenships on their own volition. I have no examples to cite, however being VERY familiar with government procedures, nothing would surprise me. Also, I've been playing the angles my whole life, and two rules exist 1) make absolutely sure that you have EVERYTHING covered (and even then you may not) 2)Never forget rule 1. Also never forget that as long as a law on the books, you can be prosecuted for it, even if it hasn't been enforced for years! As for the renunciation of all previous citizenships, if you don't do it, you could be prosecuted for perjury under Csota Rican law. All it would take is someone wanting "revenge" on you, I'm not a lawyer and am not giving legal advice!

 

Newman,

 

If there haven't been any obvious incidences of such prosecutions 'for years' as you've stated, it makes me wonder whether there is much point in whipping myself into a frazzle over it.

 

I just cannot convince myself that since there's been no obvious activity of this sort for such a long time that I should worry too much about the govt sudeenly deciding to jump on the situation with all-fours anytime soon.

 

Regards,

 

Paul M.

==

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I totally understand, but when it's a question of the possibility of ruiningg ones entire life, in my opinión, one would be better off choosing on the side of caution.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I totally understand, but when it's a question of the possibility of ruiningg ones entire life, in my opinión, one would be better off choosing on the side of caution.

 

Newman,

 

Here is someone else's opinion* which I though might clarify this argument somewhat:

 

=====

Everything we do today is monitored. Hi NSA! In the past you would have been called peeping toms, ostracized from society for being perverts, and jailed.

"To believe is very dull.

To doubt is intensely engrossing.

To be on the alert is to live,

to be lulled into security is to die."

-- Oscar Wilde

(1854-1900)

=====
Well all I can say is organizations like the NSA are emonitoring EVerybody then why would you or I, as the wee tiny motes of dust in the scheme of things that we are, be focused upon by those biggies whose goal is to aid in ensuring that the govt make loads of mega-moolah when you and I have comparatively a mere pittance? Given that perspective I (at least) feel actually quite safe and largely invisible.
Regards,
Paul M.
==
* Quote reprinted with author's permission. (Well not Mr. Wilde's, of course.)
==

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But Paul, if you don't spend your life obsessing about other peoples' BC/BS coverage at Biblica or lack thereof, imagined nuclear false flags and being singled out for meaningless persecution by "them", what fun is there in life?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What fun is there in life???

 

Well, to quote part of the song "ALot of Livin' to Do" from the show BYE BYE BIRDIE:

 

=====

 

There's music to play,
Places to go, people to see!
Everything
For you and me!

Oh, Life's a ball
if only you know it
And it's all just waiting for you
You're alive,
So come on and show it
We got a lot of livin'
Such a lot of livin'
Got a lot of livin' to do!

 

=====

 

So my contention is that life is far too interesting (and way too short) for me to waste my time concentrating on all those negatives of which most are unlikely to come to pass anyway.

 

Instead i try to go out and smell the flowers as often as possible.

 

Cheers!

 

Paul M.

==

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paul, you wrote, "So my contention is that life is far too interesting (and way too short) for me to waste my time concentrating on all those negatives of which most are unlikely to come to pass anyway."

 

Me, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yesterday I bought Travel Insurance which covers my wife and I for our six(6) day trip to Cuba for a total cost for the both of us $118.

 

Oh Mojito(s)!

Edited by tibas9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.