Jump to content

Recommended Posts

You may find that your preferred beach area is too hot, as many have done so in the past and instead choose a sea view, but in the interior. Ticos who have taken English courses are still loathe to use it.

The 'good healthcare', that is the private healthcare and facilities, is more likely to be found in the towns in the interior, nearer San Jose....not in the beach communities or in the more rural areas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Thanks for the good input.

We'll stay in CR for a considerably long time first anyway but we're also trying to keep our eyes and minds open to possible options and alternatives and we're wondering if we should plan on exploring these options.

 

I'm trying to collect information to make a pro/con list. Please feels free to correct me if I'm wrong and let me know what needs to be added. Most of the information is based on more or less credible internet sources.

 

CR Pros

  • diverse landscape
  • diverse climate
  • many English speaking areas
  • cost of health care once you're a permanent resident

CR Cons

  • long process of immigration
  • high crime rate
  • high cost of health care until you become a permanent resident (compared to)

 

Panama Pros

  • health care (quality and cost)
  • infrastructure and technology

Panama Cons

  • cost of living (highest compared to ...?)
  • climate (hot and humid)

Nicaragua Pros

  • low cost of living
  • affordable health care
  • safest country in Central America

Nicaragua Cons

  • Politically questionable
  • weak infrastructure and technology
  • possible occurrence of Hurricanes

 

Not sure about Nicaragua listed as the safest country in Central America. Mind you I like Nicaragua. If you check web there are statements about being 2nd safest or equal to Costa Rica. Don't take 1 statement as gospel truth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Health care in Costa Rica's private sector costs the same whether you're a tourist, a temporary resident, a permanent resident or a citizen. As a legal resident (temporary or permanent), you are required to be enrolled in the national health system, the CAJA, whether you elect to use it or not. As compared to the cost of medical care in the U.S., care here is dirt cheap. Can't speak to Nicaragua or Panama.

 

There is no evidence that the crime rate in Costa Rica is materially higher than the rate in other Central American countries. In fact, the murder rate is significantly lower.

 

Panama, too, is subject to governmental instability. Can you say, "Manuel Noriega"? Costa Rica has an unbroken of democracy that dates back to 1948. No other Central American country has a record that approaches that in any way.

 

I've added "politically stable democracy" to the Pros list of CR.

If you have to pay $400/mth or more for health care, I wouldn't call this "dirt cheap".

 

I've been looking at the crime and safety report at https://www.osac.gov/pages/ContentReportDetails.aspx?cid=14288 for CR and https://www.osac.gov/pages/ContentReportDetails.aspx?cid=14357 for Nica, but others as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Realize that CAJA costs that you see posted, are what they are now and although we hope they will stay there, we don't expect it to happen.

Most expats choose to use private care over CAJA....even when they are paying the mandatory CAJA fees.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

What I wrote was that health care in the private sector is cheap, not that CAJA premiums are cheap.

 

Even if CAJA enrollment does cost $400, and not everyone pays that, by the time you factor out deductibles, copays, etc it's still pretty reasonable.

 

Crime reports in Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, the U.S. and everywhere else in the world are notoriously inaccurate. Differences in definition and the incompleteness of reporting by both victims and police agencies render them almost meaningless. And if different agencies are reporting on different jurisdictions, that's another layer of inaccuracy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Most expats choose to use private care over CAJA....even when they are paying the mandatory CAJA fees.

 

That makes it even more expensive and raises the cost to a level of highly developed western nations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Crime reports in Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, the U.S. and everywhere else in the world are notoriously inaccurate. Differences in definition and the incompleteness of reporting by both victims and police agencies render them almost meaningless. And if different agencies are reporting on different jurisdictions, that's another layer of inaccuracy.

 

I'm sure they are inaccurate to a certain degree. However, many user of this forum have confirmed in a different thread how high the level of crime in CR is. I try to draw a picture of the information that's available.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sure they are inaccurate to a certain degree. However, many user of this forum have confirmed in a different thread how high the level of crime in CR is. I try to draw a picture of the information that's available.

Yes, but the question, as always, is whether they're reflecting on accurate data or isolated anecdotal evidence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I'm sure they are inaccurate to a certain degree. However, many user of this forum have confirmed in a different thread how high the level of crime in CR is. I try to draw a picture of the information that's available.

 

And Redneck, to argue the opposite side of crime levels, then:

 

By the same token there are those of us who've been in CR for a long itme and have so far never been directly impacted by crime.

 

I've been visiting CR since 1976 and have been a resident since 2006. I don't make it a habit go into areas of high crime and if I do it is with a good reason(such as Barrio Coca Cola to one of the bus terminals there) and while I am there am cautious. (One learns one's way around if one is wise.)

 

The worst thing that happened to me was done by one taxista who thought that I didn't know my way around and chose to take me eastbound through the north side of San José which due to the street layouts slows your eastbound speed down and requilres lots of sidetracking. This was on a Sunday when the Paseo Colón is often closed to vehicular traffic, so to get from La Sabana to the National Theater he should've gone around the south side of downtown SJ and then come back into the Centro heading northbound from south of the Theater.

 

What I wound up with instead of the equivalent of the usual US$2 to $3 doallar fare turned into essentially a US$10 to $12 dollar fare. This driver was nasty afterwards about the whole routing thing. I w to meas later told by a taxi driver friend that that is a trick some drivers will foist on those that they consider newbies. I consider it a theft in the long run, but I'm lucky nothing worse has ever happened, but I try not to put myself unnecessarily 'in harm's way'.

 

So one incidence in just shy of 40 years of visiting CR is a pretty good average, IMO, but I'll bet there are lots of others who have been similarly unaffected by crime.

 

As always, we tend to hear the weepings & wailings of those who have been touched by crime instead of those who have not. (It's essentially that whole thing about crime selling newspapers!)

 

Just FWIW . . .

 

Regards,

 

Paul M.

==

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Paul, this is good to hear (read) somehow reassuring. If you don't mind me asking (maybe you've mentioned it already), which area of CR do you live in?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Paul, this is good to hear (read) somehow reassuring. If you don't mind me asking (maybe you've mentioned it already), which area of CR do you live in?

 

I live in Alajuela Centro. I"m just about ten to twelve minutes from the airport, but on the north side of Alajuela.

 

Alajuela offers me about 95% of everyting I need in CR and except for going to ARCR or to the occasional govt office, or once in a while to the symphony at the National Theater I don't even have to go to San José.

 

HTH

 

Paul M.

==

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The main thing to remember about Nicaragua is that they are less developed than CR or Pan. This has a lot to do with various US imposed economic sanctions on the country over the past 30 years, more than the government of the country itself. Due to the economic pressure against them, they have had a hard time bringing many things up to date vs CR. From what I have heard from people that have traveled there, in the more rural areas you will have a hard time finding the internet/cell phone infrastructure that you will find here. The medical system is also not as advanced there vs here. This is to be considered for a retiree.

In many areas near the northern border, there are also huge resentments against the US due to the contras that came across the border and killed thousands of Nicaraguans. Some Nicas have forgiven all that, but many have not. One does need to keep this in mind when traveling there. For the most part tho, I have heard that the Nicaraguans are friendly towards US persons.

 

But one really needs to go there, just as here, to make your own judgement.

 

I should note that we have not yet visited there, but have spoken to many that have.

Edited by DanaJ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WIkipedia says the US Embargo with Nicaragua lasted from 1985 to 1990. I can't find information about any other formal sanctions. Outside of that, the US isn't required to buy or sell anything from a particular country. "president" for life Ortega and his wife can buy and sell things elsewhere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.