Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
newsygal

Thinking of buying a condo in Tamarindo - thoughts?

Recommended Posts

I generally agree with all the points above. However, if you take full advantage of what is easily available in CR, then buying property is not as scary as my friends above point out. Title Insurance, video topography/survey, a well-known attorney, seeing the HOA/POA agreements if there are any, looking at electrical and water costs, etc. The tools are in Costa Rica to make sure accidents happen 'almost never' - but many do not do their homework and as this string suggest, bad news travels fast! Enjoy your journey....

Great post. Honest agents and lawyers do exist in this country. There are safeguards in place, if they are used.

 

But....in my opinion, rent first to make sure both of you like it 110%. Selling, while doable, is not as easy as buying.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure if there is an blanket answer to this, but what would be the budget for a long term rental in Tamarindo. We aren't into fancy or frills but want to be at least walking distance to the beach. Two bed, two bath seems to cost about $700 a month but does this include utilities? We are looking about 900 to 1000 square feet, gated, communal pool, internet. When we tour units, is it acceptable to see utility bills? I'm trying to put together a budget to ensure we are saving enough. I'd like to do it between $1500 and $2000 a month.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My opinion is that doing it on that $1500 would be difficult especially at the beach. Utilities are not usually included on a long term rental, and if you use AC your electricity bill, alone can be $300+. Food is more expensive than in Canada except the local veggie & fruit produce. Golf fees would eat into your budget, too. I doubt whether they would volunteer to show utility receipts although you could ask....

For $700 per month, it may not be 'fully furnished'. Check that this rate is not for a week, rather than a month.

As a resident, remember you have mandatory health insurance which varies depending on what status you apply for. Until then, you would be wise to have private insurance.

When you are out of Canada, (I think Ontario is 7 months you lose you healthcare), but it isn't valid here, anyway.

If you intend to leave Canada as a 'non-resident for tax purposes' and you have a govt pension, 25% will be 'withheld' every month.

Edited by costaricafinca

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't wonder though, that some of those high prices for electric, i.e., for running an a/c unit part time, mightn't be that high because the bill is set to commercial rates since a rental unit, especially when rented short term, is essentially a commercial enterprise.

 

Sounds like something that might could happen in CR in certain situations.

 

Regards,

 

Paul M.

==

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You have to be very frugal to live anywhere in Costa Rica on $1500 per month. You can forget air conditioned, condos with swimming pools. It would be possible to live in areas that don't require air or heating, don't have water heaters, nor electric clothes driers. You have to eat mostly locally grown fruits and vegetables and not eat at restaurants often.

 

If you are not retired, your government health insurance costs will be high, up to $400 per month.

 

Our rent is $400 per month and electric is $30. We have no AC, water heater, nor clothes drier. We still spend around $2,000 per month when we aren't traveling.

 

T

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You have to be very frugal to live anywhere in Costa Rica on $1500 per month. You can forget air conditioned, condos with swimming pools. It would be possible to live in areas that don't require air or heating, don't have water heaters, nor electric clothes driers. You have to eat mostly locally grown fruits and vegetables and not eat at restaurants often.

 

If you are not retired, your government health insurance costs will be high, up to $400 per month.

 

Our rent is $400 per month and electric is $30. We have no AC, water heater, nor clothes drier. We still spend around $2,000 per month when we aren't traveling.

 

T

 

But don't you have children?

 

We live in a similar place, and spend about $500 less per month. We do have a clothes dryer, but its only used on those rare occasions when it rains in the mornings and we can't hang the cloths outside to dry.

I think that one can live on $1500 or so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Comparing costs for living 'in town' where AC is not needed, can't be compared to living in a condo 'at the beach' where it may be very hot, all the time .... and don't forget that a drier will be needed frequently, as you can't hang your laundry outside on a balcony.... B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Newsygal, there are quite a few threads here talking about cost of living, it would probably be really helpful to check those out, though it might be kind of a pain to find them. I am often surprised at how expensive things like food and electronics are here. I have friends who live in other Latin American countries, and sometimes am quite envious hearing them talk about the cost of living there, but my husband is tico, so ... I'm here, jaja. I live really "tico": no car, no A/C, no dryer, eating mostly beans, fruits, veggies (I'm vegetarian, so we don't buy meat, only fish occasionally), we rarely eat out, and when we do it's at a local soda, or occasionally at Jalapeños, the forum-famous Tex-Mex joint in Alajuela just because we all have our vices. With all that, I still find it fairly expensive to live here, much more so than I'd expected, coming from Seattle. I'm doubtful that $1500 is doable at a beach place. Anyway, check out the threads ... I can't remember names of them, but if searches for "cost of living" etc. don't turn up much, those threads usually had a lot of references to air conditioning, electricity, dryers, imported items, electronics, food, fruits/vegetables, ferias, monthly budgets, etc. A lot of them were pretty long, so you'll get a range of opinions and experiences. Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We don't have kids. Just us old folks. We are not on a tight budget and could probably do without a couple things. Some people do live on less than we do. The question becomes, "What do I have to have and what can I do without?" That is true anywhere.

 

 

T

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Villa verde II is poorly managed, HOA high.big complex with lots of units, so many do not pay condo/ HOA a fee and it is looks good only on the photos...

Many Realestate companies do not update their websites for a long time...

Come here, go to the ABC or Alliance or Remax and they will show you what really available at the time.

They all speak English.

Be very careful and do not do any emotional decisions.

After all, Tamarindo is a really vibrant fast growing beach town with low humidity and a great night life.

Lots of Canadians! USA and Europeans.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.