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But I'm totally hating CR right now! :rolleyes:

 

We just had to fill out my esposo's online application for USA residency and had to write addresses for all the places he's lived, went to school, worked, and where his family lives. Of course the online form has a nice tidy "street address" block with a character limit. We spend over a full hour just trying to figure out addresses for these places! Ugh! We first tried to find street names, but not all the streets on google maps have names. Then we just started putting tico addresses, but they wouldn't fit. So we had to amend the "addresses". Geeze, what a hassle! Just get street names and addresses, Costa Rica!!!

 

Also, getting his police record has been a complete pain in the ass.

 

Anyways, I can almost see the light at the end of the 3 years (1.5 years of my CR residency here, 1.5 years of my esposo's residency to USA) visa tunnel. Oh what a sweet relief that will be. I'm going to get ridiculously drunk when this is all over. :P

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'Debbie Downer' is an alliterative ersatz term that means something like 'party pooper' (which is another of that same sort of cnstruct).

 

I don't much blame you for being frustrated, Lucy. Hope you manage to make the form work and it goes through process asap.

 

Fingers X-ed!

 

Paul M.

==

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When I helped a Costa Rican friend through this process, we just entered as much information as would fit. I seriously doubt that anyone checks any of it. My friend's visa sailed right through.

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OK I just have to ask ........ what does Debbie have to do with this and who is she?

 

Pretty sure this was a tongue in cheek comment, but.....................

 

'Debbie Downer' is an alliterative ersatz term that means something like 'party pooper' (which is another of that same sort of cnstruct).

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I don't know why it is Costa Ricas fault that the US forms do not support CR addresses. Sounds like US needs to consider that not all countries have address format same as US.

 

It's Costa Rica's fault they HAVE NO ADDRESSES!!! You can't possibly consider "100 metros sur del antigua farmacia fischel" an address.

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It's Costa Rica's fault they HAVE NO ADDRESSES!!! You can't possibly consider "100 metros sur del antigua farmacia fischel" an address.

#developingcountry

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Yeah, it's technically still developing, but hell Nicaragua has addresses. Panama does, too. Honduras does as well. And as far as I know so do Mexico, El Salvador, Guatemala and Belize. Why is CR the only place without addresses?

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Other countries do not all have addresses formatted like the ones in The United States of America. Eg. ......village name...Rural Route # 7 is neither a street nor a house number. Moreover 100m north of the Catholic Church in ....... is a perfectly good 'direction'

However, it IS frustrating to try to fit one set of data into the form requesting a different set.

Good Luck! meant in a friendly manner, NOT sarcastically.

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Yeah, it's technically still developing, but hell Nicaragua has addresses. Panama does, too. Honduras does as well. And as far as I know so do Mexico, El Salvador, Guatemala and Belize. Why is CR the only place without addresses?

Not too many years ago rural areas of Nova Scotia,Canada had no official addresses. 2nd blue house on church street because the church was there etc. many now only have a R.R.# with a house number & there are many little side streets besides the main road & no street names. We just ask.

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At least until very recently, perhaps with the spread of 911 systems, plenty of rural addresses read, "(Name), RR (route number), (Town, State, ZIP Code)".

 

The mail was delivered by a carrier who knew who lived where.

Edited by David C. Murray

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When we lived in WA State (rural community), a refund check was delivered to me at our post office box. It had an address that had no bearing on reality (I think the street address listed was part of the check number or something similar), but my name was right, and the post office delivered it! Anywhere else and it would have been DOA...

 

And, lucybelle, don't be so hard on poor CR. If you look, other countries, outside of the larger cities, also sometimes use landmarks and directions. I've gotten used to things here. Think about the poor sap in Seattle, for example, who's looking for an address, only to find that the street ends and doesn't pick up again for miles, a lake or ravine or cemetery being in the way... or where NE 40th St meets 40th Ave NE ...(Or in southern CA, where Foothills Blvd makes something like 40 name changes -- same street -- as it crosses city boundaries.) Street addresses aren't always all they're cracked up to be.

 

regards,

Gayle

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A couple of years ago, ARCR sent our monthly verification of CAJA enrollment to

 

David C. Murray

2444-xxxx (our phone number, that is)

Grecia

 

and it came right to our door.

 

So maybe that's the secret, lucybelle. Just write your phone number and the town name.

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