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Hi everyone,

 

I am hoping that someone on the forums may either know the answers to my questions or be able to direct me to a source who can.

 

First question: we would like to import a very small woodstove and wonder if there are any issues with doing so. At this point, I'm not sure if we'll have it sent through Aerocasillas or do something else.

 

Second question: there is a European liqueur most assuredly not available here and no longer available in the US. We'd like to go to that country to visit, anyway, and, since we'd be there, spouse would like to bring back at least 4 or 5 bottles, maybe more. Will we need an import permit or something similar to bring that quantity back with us? (and the country is Estonia and the liqueur is Vana Tallinn, which we first had thanks to an Estonian couple who gave a bottle to our Muslim host when we were in Istanbul. And, yes, it is wonderful.)

 

Thank you for your intelligence!

 

regards,

Gayle

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The only likely reason that one would not be able to import a wood stove via Aerocasillas would be that you'd have to mortgage everything you own to pay their costs. Wood stoves are almost universally cast iron (right?). Anything large enough to burn a popsicle stick would be incredibly expensive to import regardless of the purchase price.

 

Instead, why not buy one locally? Whether you're thinking of using it to cook on or for some supplemental heat, they're readily available locally.

 

If it's import you must, consider having Mike Rappaport bring it down in his next consolidated container shipment. I think his next closing date is March 18th, but you should verify that. It would be much less expensive than using Aerocasillas.

 

 

As for the liquor, can you buy it in a "duty free" shop in the airport? Regardless, there is a certain maximum amount each traveler can bring in their luggage.

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Dave and Mark, thanks for that.

 

And, Dave, you say woodstoves are available locally -- where? We're looking for something very small and airtight -- for actual heat, not "atmosphere."

 

Vana Tallinn is not available in a duty-free shop unless maybe it's in Europe somewhere.

 

regards,

Gayle

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This reminds me of when my parents decided no more electric heat: a Buck Stove was the thing. Live off the land, they said. Off the grid, it'll be an adventure, they said. Installed it, bought a couple of donkeys to haul up the logs cut by my dad, who'd never handled a chainsaw in life prior to the arrival of the Buck Stove. Long story short, the training of the donkeys proved a bit more difficult than Mom had planned on, and the toting of logs -- up a couple of hills and across a stream, great fun in the snow -- was left to my sister and me. Blankets were quite necessary at night, and woe to the child who was caught fiddling with the "real" heat. Good times ...

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...Vana Tallinn is not available in a duty-free shop unless maybe it's in Europe somewhere...

It doesn't need to be in a Duty Free shop. You can buy it in the stores in Europe and bring it with you in your luggage, although five liters (each) will cut down your available weight allowance for everything else.

Edited by CMinCR

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costaricafinca (above) is right about M&N, but there are other sources. Check the local appliance outlets (Gollo, Casa Blanca, Importadora Monge, et al) outside the fancier neighborhoods. I've never shopped for a wood stove, so I can't be more specific, but I know I've seen them in retail store windows in Grecia. We have neighbors here, outside Grecia, who cook on wood stoves, so they have to be available somewhere.

 

You might ask at your local ferreteria, too.

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Hi everyone,and thank you for your responses. We'll check out our local ferreterias (both Alvarado and Jorcel) first, then try further afield. The two issues are, 1,airtightness so we pollute as little as possible when it's in use in our non-airtight house; 2, and it has to both be very small and not have much of an output, as the area to be heated isn't large, just to take the edge off the chill and dampness. (People who are reading this who live in one of the colder climes may be rolling their eyes, but for those of us who live here, it can get downright chilly once you're acclimatized.)

 

And to Colin's comment: you think we might have anything in our luggage other than TEN liter BOTTLES of VANA TALLINN? Nah!

 

regards,

Gayle

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The place in San Pedro is a TRUE VALUE Hardware store on the 2nd floor. I think the M&N is the supermarket down below. And I have seen wood stoves there.

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