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dbarton62

Our dream/intention to live in CR

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"But one must also have a US address, not a PO Box, to keep a bank account in the USA which is difficult to do when one is registered with the IRS as a resident of someplace else. Obviously, you can't be a resident of two countries simultaneously in the eyes of the IRS. So you lie to your American bank and give them some family member's address.

And don't forget, if you are not an official resident of CR then you ARE a resident of the USA and must apply for Obamacare if under 65. Don't apply to Obamacare and watch the 'multa's grow, based on your income. There's a giant Catch-22 gotcha!"

About the only parts I disagreed with are above. We opened bank accounts with only a PO box with a well known internet/investment bank.

As far as ObamaCare is concerned, if you are not living in the USA, you do not have to apply for it. The only penalty is for Medicare Part B (I think), where your penalty is an increase of 10% for each year you do not sign up for it.

But otherwise, based in things I have heard and been told by people here, I feel its very informative, not negative at all.

PS: Its not like renters don't have problems either. I know someone whos water & electric kept going up and they found out that the next door neighbor had tapped into thier lines. It was a big hassle, and the landlord refused to deal with it (because the person tapping the lines was a relative). They had to move.

Edited by DanaJ

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Dear Paul;


"Not sure why you posted the above, but rest assured that is not my feeling at all. In fact, gardening is the one thing that I cannot do at my apartment in CR that I wish I were able to do.
I am an avid orchid hobbyist and in Florida have a large collection of them, plus a number of other plants that I enjoy, including roses, ferns, gingers, bananas, and some exotic tropicals."



I am sorry if I hurt your feelings by my remark about horticulture. I knew from previous post that you were something of an orchid specialist and have a lovely garden in Florida. I come from the FAR north and can live there in an apartment, but here I love my garden.



I posted the refute in this stream because the negativity expressed annoyed me and seemed extreemely one-sided. When looking for "a big garden with a little house" I enjoyed the company of many real estate salespeople who kindly showed me properties that were almost perfect. At times I even felt guilty for taking so much of their time without making a purchase, but I only needed the one perfect place. Several salespersons drove me as far as Orotina, Atenas, Grecia and San Ramon from San Jose. Others showed me places in the hills behind Flamingo Beach in Guanacaste. I even saw properties between Dominical and San Isidro.At NO time were any of the many salespersons rude, pushy, or in any way unprofessional.



Sometimes the people who look for bargains are the ones who push too hard.


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Good post Annelise. There are some really good realtors in this country. There is also very bad ones who scam and lie at any moment available for a quick buck. It's unfortunate that most of the time the negative experiences are discussed. That's the way life is. We keep the good experiences to ourselves, yet tell the world about the negatives.

 

A good realtor can be very valuable.

Edited by jesselongworth

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Anyone who's been in Costa Rica long enough to investigate the situation here soon enough learns that there are no real Realtors in Costa Rica and neither is there a national MLS (Multiple Listing Service) in place. And there is no Govt Licensing Agency which ensures professionalism in real estate sales in CR by registering/licensing the sellers.

 

What there are in Costa Rica (up to now) are only real estate salespersons, so that any Tom, Dick, or Harrietta can come to CR and as soon as they arrive hang out a sign (and often do) setting themselves up in real estate without any qualifications whatsoever. And this situation doesn't seem about to shange anytime soon.

 

Yes there are a few honest real estate sellers in CR but there are surely more than plenty of those who are only in it for what they can get.

 

For that reason the potential buyer should be aware of all this and act accordingly and cautiously.

 

Regards,

 

Paul M.

==

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Actually Paul there is a national realtor association. Any honest hearted agent is and should be a member of this association. Its the Camara Costarricense de Corredores de Bienes Raices. www.camara.cr As for Tom, Dick and Harriet, one bad deal and the gig is up. Expat communities talk and reputations spread fast. Like I said in an earlier post, negative experiences are more discussed.

 

No CRF I don't think real estate is in my future. I have some good friends who are agents here in CR and have had long discussions with them and have learned quite a bit. Marketing for real estate interests me more than being an agent.

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Yes, Jesse there are some very good and knowledgeable agents, it's finding them, that is the problem....and a new comer does not usually have the contacts with the local population to know the good from the ones to avoid..

Good luck!

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We live in the Grecia are where, for a number of years, an American couple who self-declared themselves to be knowledgeable real estate agents took far too many liberties with unsuspecting customers. "Clients" is not a term to associate with this pair. Far too many deals went far too wrong. In fact, their reputation became so widely known that when folks from neighboring towns asked us where we live, their replies were sometimes, "So, did you get [insert name here}ed?"

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David that is what I mean about reputations, they spread fast.

 

CRF this is where taking time to purchase a property is beneficial. Get to know your expat community during this intro phase. Ask questions to everyone. People will tell you who to use and who to avoid.

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...that is what I mean about reputations, they spread fast.

 

Jesse, the unfortunate part is that the "clients" are expat candidates who find the "real estate professional" via Internet and then become "victims"... The reputation may be known far and wide here, but those poor souls have bright hopes, small pocketbooks, and too much trust in someone trying to sell them something...

 

Unfortunate but true, and one of the reasons to caution those people anxious to come here and buy something...

 

Caveat emptor

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Exactly... which is why I advise everyone to do just that, take the time to check around before buying that beautiful place that the agent has said, won't last long....

 

Had we done this, before we purchased property here, we could have avoided many of the pitfalls we encountered 'after the purchase'.

 

Over the years, I have made web pages for some of those trying to sell property and I refused to write what I knew to be a 'non-truthful statement' such as saying that a 'planned addition' was in already in place or providing photos that were not taken in the actual location.

Edited by costaricafinca

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