Jump to content

lvlazarus

Members
  • Content Count

    30
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

About lvlazarus

  • Rank
    New Member
  1. In regard to Black prejudice in Costa Rica, you might find reading on the history of the United Fruit Company and the "great banana strike" of 1934 of interest. I have observed rare occasional "debate" between CR locals regarding "skin tone" which appears to reference "the darker the skin tone the more likely of mixed ethnicity". Usually meaning the person is of Afro-Caribbean descent. I say "debate" because the person to which the inquiry was directed did take some initial offense, but seemed to understand the comment was not malicious. From there the conversation progressed into more of a lesson in the history of indigenous peoples to Costa Rica. To make a long story short, although I have observed what could be deemed prejudice against blacks in general, it is nothing like what I've experienced in the U.S. It seems more like an "interest" or "inquiry" as opposed to an accusation or condemnation. I should also mention the only instances I witnessed occurred in the Central Pacific region of CR and not Limon which has the largest population of Afro-Caribbean descendants. As was mentioned in other posts, I've seen more evidence of prejudice against people of specific countries rather than race. (ie: Nicaragua, Columbia, Venezuela, etc.) In general, I find the people of Costa Rica generous, tolerant, and quite hospitable. Don't think I could ask for a better place or better company.
  2. It is always in the best interest of a property owner to have someone watching the property in their absence. That can be a friend, a management company, or someone employed for that purpose. Squatters would likely be the least of your worries compared to vandalism or theft for the area you are going, IMHO, and possibly no more a threat than where you live currently. For your own peace of mind, take the proper precautions and have someone keep an eye on your place; check with your lawyer or real estate agent or a trusted person who can give you additional info for your area. When I am not in CR, that is what I have done and thus far it has worked out well. Buena Suerte! PS: I believe the answer to your question is 3 months.... If a squatter is on your property more than 3 months the process to get them off becomes much more complicated.
  3. For those curious about buying real estate in Costa Rica as well as different ways to hold title, I highly recommend Scott Oliver's "How To Buy Costa Rica Real Estate Without Losing Your Camisa" (Camisa is shirt in Spanish). It has a multitude of information which will give anyone a heads-up on the how to, what to expect, and where else to go for more information and resources. [www.welovecostarica.com] ARCR also gives an abundant amount of information to those attending their seminars. If you come to Costa Rica, DO try to plan around the regular seminar dates. You will not regret it! Another excellent source for Costa Rican law and legal information (including Real Estate transactions and the different types of corporations) is Roger Peterson's "The Legal Guide To Costa Rica" which can be purchased on the ARCR website. These are among numerous very good resources that should be studied by anyone planning to make Costa Rica a part of their lives. Many of these are even available at your local library, book store, or your neighbors house; so you can check them out before you buy! PURA VIDA!
  4. THANKS BOB! Do you happen to know if this type of purchase would just be a matter of making the proper entries of sale and ownership/board changes in the corporate books (with atty supervision of course) prior to turning all books over to the new owner? No registro involvement necessary? Muchisimas gracias!
  5. I'm interested in purchasing a property held by an S.A. I have heard this is an "easier" transaction than when property is held in an individual's name, provided, of course, that both property and the corporation are without liens, encumbrances, etc. What would be involved? Without meaning to over-simplify, does the SA simply hand over their books or what? I'm sure there would be attorney fees, but would anything be done through the Registro? Has anyone out there had experience with this? Would appreciated any input from other's who may have experienced this or have knowledge of same. Thanks!!
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.