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FredS

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About FredS

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  1. uwsgrrrl... May I ask in general terms? Approximately what is your age? I'm a "senior" and am drawn to the PV area though have not experienced it. But have concerns about medical care though it is really not an issue at this point unless I have an unexpected heart attack or whatever!
  2. The owner of the brand planted vines in long straight rows, and in a lousy grape growing region hence cheaper land. The grapes are picked mechanically and along with them go the bugs, bits of stems and other not nice things. I used to get some once in a while but now I stick to $7 (in the states) Jacob's Creek from Australia. With a screw cap. Good stuff at the price point. Here's a link about the 2 buck Chuck, and below is an excerpt. http://www.snopes.com/business/market/shawwine.asp A few things to keep in mind about his vineyards: one is that they are located in what is known as the Central Valley in the California wine world which is notoriously flat and quite hot producing massive yields of overripe grapes. The other thing is that Fred Franzia is no dummy — he planted those vineyards in such a way as the rows run north-south, giving the vines maximum sun exposure and he made the rows as long as he possibly could, minimizing the number of turns his tractors would need to make. And third, these aren't hand-picked vineyards ... they are all machine harvested. And that means these large tractors with huge claws go down the rows of vineyards grabbing the grapes and depositing them in its huge receptacle. And it not only grabs ripe grapes, but unripe and down right rotten ones as well and throws them all together. Add to that leaves, stems and any rodents, birds, or insects that may have made those vines their home — they all get thrown into the bin as well. And guess what? You think there's going to be any sorting when that truck arrives at the winery (or should I say processing facility)? Nope. Everything, and I do mean everything (including all those unripe grapes, rotten grapes, leaves, stems, birds, rodents, and insects) gets tossed into the crusher and transferred to large tanks to ferment. So think about all the animal blood and parts that may have made their way into your wine next time you crack open that bottle of Two Buck Chuck! Hardly even seems worth the $2 does it?
  3. Shea meant a lot to this flyby forum member. She was always a voice of reason. I'm sorry I never got a chance to meet her. Bless you, Shea.
  4. Guess I missed this earlier. When I was thinking of MX this little beach town seemed to be safe, inexpensive, hospitable and apparently has great weather. But that's just from reading internet stuff.
  5. I have been sorting my way through this very question for a few years now. I just visited CR but have never been to Nicarauga or Panama except for a layover. But I've been doing the online thing for a long time and my impressions are these. Very simplified. Nicarauga offers a lower cost of living. The country is the 2nd poorest in the world after Haiti. Granada popular and very hot. Many very poor people everywhere (not judging the poor, just saying). Some say they feel safer in Nicarauga. Others not so much. Panama is on the dollar currency-wise and has a good socialized health care system. Infrastructure is more first world. Hotter and humider even than CR. Live inland. Shop in David. Or live on the very hot and deserted-out-of-season coast. Just throwing this out here. I'd love to hear more. I think it's probably a very personal gut feeling and I think I know why it would be CR for me. With no real basis for comparison of course.
  6. San Franciso (San Pancho), MX. Just sayin...
  7. I just did a 2-week whiz bang loop tour with the intention of checking out 3 specific areas with a couple of beach stops on the way. I went from Alajuela to Grecia, then San Ramon and Palmares. Then hopped a bus to Jaco for a day and on to Quepos and Manuel Antonio for 2. Then to San Isidro del General PZ back to Alajuela and out. I was particularly interested in San Ramon or Palmares and San Isidro as a place to live. I got the best "vibe" for all of my concerns in San Isidro which is at a great elevation weather wise and about an hour to Domincal by public bus. All the city amenities you could want plus a great weekly feria and extremely affordable all around. I was assured after the better part of a day being shown around on foot and by car that it would be very possible to find comfortable and safe rentals furnished and with all utilities for $300-$400. And I don't doubt that. I think this is one of the best areas to live in as far as affordability and quality of life issues. But remember, this is from someone who has only had a brief visit and is no authority. Just food for thought and research.
  8. Please do. I'm a sponge re: CR info and opinions. Sincerely.
  9. Very, very nice! Congrats to you 2.
  10. San Pancho is on the Pacific Coast north of Puerto Vallarta and Sayulita. My concern is being able to afford CR and saving enough to fly back home at least once a year. And interestingly enough, I just found out that starting Nov. 13 of this year Mexico raised the guaranteed monthly income for a pensionado to $2000 from $1200! I don't understand that when their native median personal income is only about $450/month.
  11. Savannahjo, thanks for that input. Have you been in, or have any knowledge of San Pancho (San Francisco)?
  12. I debated whether to post this and figured, why not? Any opinions on accuracy or other enlightenments? I know the comparison is too broad geographically but still... Try opening both links in 2 browser windows side by side: http://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/compare_countries_result.jsp?country1=Costa+Rica&country2=United+States http://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/compare_countries_result.jsp?country1=Mexico&country2=United+States I've been doing way too much online research. I think my eyeballs are about to bleed.
  13. Choose well for optimum nutririon. The "ANDI" scorre is the Aggregate Nutrient Density Index (ANDI) score, developed by Dr. Joel Fuhrman, measures calcium; the carotenoids beta carotene, alpha carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin, and lycopene; fiber; folate; glucosinolates; iron; magnesium; niacin; selenium; vitamins B1 (thiamine), B2 (riboflavin), B6, B12, C, and E; and zinc, plus the ORAC score X 2. Most importantly, the ANDI scores are based on calories, not volume or weight of food, so a lower-calorie food with more nutrients scores higher than a calorie-dense food. Here's a list of scores for various foods. The first link is a good quick overview. The second, more comprehensive. Very interesting. http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/healthy-eating/health-starts-here/resources-and-tools/top-ten-andi-scores http://humaneliving.wordpress.com/2013/01/02/andi-scores/
  14. It IS Facebook. It COULD just be natural fog. And a hoax. God I hope so. But I won't hold my breath.
  15. This is in a FB post I just read. True? I don't know. Purported to be the ocean boiling off the coast of Fukushima. I don't know if you have to have a FB account to see it, but here it is. https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10201841613545324&set=gm.564597113597244&type=1&theater FWIW.